The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from April 21, 1997

A Big or Small School? How to Find the Right Fit
To go big or go small? When it comes to picking a college, that is an essential question.Each year in the US approximately 1.5 million seniors start the admissions process by thinking about that issue. It deserves their attention, as key differences...
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A Not-So-Uniform Universe? Scientists Challenge a Cosmic 'Law' Discovery of Corkscrew Radio Waves Could Modify Theories about Origin of the Universe
As if looking at a cosmic packing crate, two scientists may have found a "this end up" sign for the universe.For years, the concept that there is no up, down, or preferred direction in space - that the universe applies its rules equally in all directions...
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Around and around the Mommy Track
The public school in our town has a quarter-mile athletic track used by all the students from kindergarten through 12th grade. But everybody knows that the track's not really for the kids. Oh no. The track belongs to the moms like me who stay home with...
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Aware of False Prophets Bringing a Spiritual Perspective to Daily Life
The suicides of Heaven's Gate cult members in California, discovered March 26, stirred me. I felt compassion both for them and for their loved ones. You see, I had an experience that almost brought me into a religious group where my thoughts and actions...
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Ban on Miniskirts Reflects A Rift in a Mexican City Is It a Loss of Personal Freedom or Propaganda by Ruling Party?
On a downtown street in Mexico's second-largest city, a seedy bar garishly advertises its two big attractions, table dancing and transvestite shows.That might seem unremarkable in the average metropolis of 5 million people, but this is Guadalajara, a...
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'Computers Give Children the Key to Learning' INTERVIEW SEYMOUR PAPERT
Mathematician Seymour Papert is hopeful.Never before has society been so close to freeing children from school walls, grading systems, and an overdependence on adults, says Dr. Papert, a professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge...
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Computers Spark Faster Pace, More Student Initiative Hi-Tech Focus in Lowell, Mass., Changes Teachers' Style and Blurs Subject Boundaries
The eighth-grader swells with pride when he talks about the computer projects he's done in school.Using state-of-the-art technology, the student at Benjamin Butler Middle School in Lowell, Mass., has written musical scores, toured the Louvre's art collections,...
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Congress Gears Up for Weighty Week BUDGET AND CHEMICAL WEAPONS
So far, the 105th Congress has been unremarkable, with few achievements to its credit. But this week could go a long way toward changing that.In an atmosphere left highly charged by a number of political brawls, Congress will take up a series of contentious...
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Constable's Icon Deserves Respect the Tate Houses the National Collection of British Art. This Is the Gallery's Centenary; but Actually, Only Its British Collection Is 100. It Began Acquiring International Modern Art in 1917. Series: Curators' Tour: Tate Gallery, London
Anne Lyles recently took another look at one of the most familiar paintings in the Tate Gallery: John Constable's "Flatford Mill" of 1816-17."And I heard a couple behind me, saying 'Oh, it's that "Flatford Mill." You see it on a hundred chocolate boxes!'...
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Credit Card Industry Puts Squeeze on Strapped Debtors 'Reaffirmations' Sound Friendly, but Sears Used These Deals Illegally
Watch out, credit card users!The squeeze is on, sometimes illegally, from the credit card industry.And while the industry grows tougher, consumers become weaker, as record numbers of borrowers seek bankruptcy protection. For lenders, aggressive debt...
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Davy Jones Welcomes the Boston Celtics NBA's 50th Finds the C's at the Bottom of the Sea
If ever there was a year when the Boston Celtics felt like reenacting the Boston Tea Party, this was it.As the National Basketball Association celebrated its 50th anniversary, the Celtics turned in a performance so miserable that it belonged only one...
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Despite Rule by China, US Stake in Hong Kong Keeps Growing
The US has surpassed Britain as the dominant foreign presence in Hong Kong, with an enormous stake in maintaining Hong Kong's economic success and freedoms after it becomes a special region of China on July 1, 1997.In recent years, Americans have comprised...
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Dow at 12,000! Could Happen, Says Analyst WEEK AHEAD
A stumbling stock market offers cause for celebration, says one expert, not concern.It's a "buying opportunity," says Raymond Worseck, chief economist at A.G. Edwards & Sons Inc., one of the nation's largest retail brokerage houses.Mr. Worseck sees this...
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Endangered Species Act Must Be Enforced for the Benefit of All
When the US Fish and Wildlife Service decided to cut off irrigation water to farms and ranches in Oregon and Northern California to protect an endangered sucker fish, thousands of acres of crops and hundreds of head of cattle were threatened. Farmers...
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From Sermons to Game Shows, Religious TV Wears New Look BEYOND TELEVANGELISM
On the sleek set of the game show "Inspiration Please!," host Robert G. Lee is grilling his three contestants. "Which emperor made Christianity the Roman Empire's official religion?"Before the question is entirely out of Mr. Lee's mouth, Patrick is hitting...
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Ifs, Ands, or Butts of Tobacco Settlement Will $300 Billion and Less Advertising Mollify Critics of the Industry?
How much money should the Marlboro man fork over? And, what about that camel - what's his fair share?These questions would have seemed ludicrous even two weeks ago. But faced with assaults on all sides, the nation's biggest tobacco firms have made a...
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Immigration Law Tuneup
Most of the immigration reform measures passed last year by Congress were reasonable. They addressed legal loopholes that, for example, have made it possible for many illegal immigrants to make questionable claims of hardship in order to gain legal residency....
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Japan at a Boil over Nuclear Agency's Coverups Officials Admitted Last Week Waiting 30 Hours before Reporting a Leak; Premier Is 'Disgusted.'
Satomi Oba, a one-time Hiroshima schoolteacher who campaigns against the use of plutonium in Japan's nuclear-energy program, isn't surprised by the tactics of the government-run corporation responsible for using the substance safely.As a resident of...
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Letters
US Foreign Policy Aims ContradictoryYour article "Clinton Team Forges Foreign-Policy 'Vision' " (March 31) confirms the suspicion that the Clinton team's foreign policy vision is cross-eyed. What Secretary of State Madeleine Albright and National Security...
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Next for Netanyahu: Shore Up Fragile Coalition
Fallout from an influence-peddling scandal could break apart Israel's ruling right-wing coalition and cause early elections, even though Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has escaped indictment on corruption charges.Both Edna Arbel, Israel's state attorney,...
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Officials Spin Fairy Tales, but Zaireans Don't Listen MOBUTU'S 'OSTRICH MENTALITY'
When Zaire's strategic river city Kisangani fell to rebels last month, state-run television neglected to mention the fact in its evening news. Instead, it reported about plans for new license plates in the capital, Kinshasa.The self-delusion of the government...
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Paris, Milan ... and Beijing? Chinese Fashion Seeks Its Own Runway Flash Dull Mao Suits No Longer De Rigueur in New Political Climate
Chinese models who helped launch new collections on Beijing runways last week carried a huge but unspoken message: The haute couture of the rich is no longer a class crime.Fashion is back in a country that until recently was forced to dress in baggy,...
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Pollution Threatens a Beloved Symbol of Canada LOONY ABOUT LOONS
"Who has ever paddled a canoe, or cast a fly, or pitched a tent in the north woods and has not stopped to listen to this wail of the wilderness? And what would the wilderness be without it?"- Arthur Cleveland Bent, naturalistFor Canadians, the familiar...
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Putting Pizazz in the Jazz Stockton and Malone Are the Duo That Sparks the Utah Team
Is this the year for the Utah Jazz? Will 1996-97 be the breakthrough season they've longed for? It's a question one hears around the National Basketball Association these days. For although the Jazz have made it to the Western Conference Finals in three...
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Strolling through Bath Visitors Will Delight in the Architecture and History of Britain's Famous Town
In April 1942, Adolf Hitler decided to take revenge on England. "You bomb our pretty towns, so we'll bomb yours," he reportedly commented before reaching for the illustrated Baedeker Guide to England, which showed the town of Bath in all its 18th-century...
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The Final Exam: Choosing the Right College as May Deadline Nears, High School Seniors Pore over Course Options, Visit Once More, Check out Campus Life
Synthia Bell has a big decision to make and she's not sure how to do it.She's read the glossy brochures, asked the questions, and visited the colleges that accepted her. Still, she wavers."Being close to my parents is important to me, but I also want...
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The News in Brief
The USFirefighters hoped to extinguish a fire in flood-ravaged Grand Forks, N.D. that they said covers about a block. Efforts were hampered by rising floodwaters after dikes holding back the Red River gave way. The rising river is expected to crest at...
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US-China Links Draws Fire Stage Set for Fierce Fight over Renewal of Preferential Trade Status
The Clinton administration's policy of putting trade ahead of civil and religious rights in China is igniting what could be the most powerful human rights movement in the US since the cold war ended.Opposition to White House policy on China is uniting...
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Wall Street Sprints Ahead, but Isn't This a Marathon? WEEK BEHIND
Wall Street rallied last week, bringing much-needed relief to investment-house front offices.But the jury is still out on the market's staying power."We had some pretty good days last week," says Hildegard Zagorski, analyst at Prudential Securities....
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What Should Be Done about Albania and Zaire? Should the US and EU Let These Two 'Failed States' Burn Themselves out? or Should They Intervene? If So, How?
Albania and Zaire are as far apart as the alphabet suggests but they both hold a warning for those who will not see their similarity.Both are failed states, one tiny, the other huge. The leaders, Sali Berisha of Albania and Mobutu Sese Seko of Zaire,...
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'Why Do We Need the Computers?' INTERVIEW NEIL POSTMAN
When asked if wiring schools is a good idea, culture critic and author Neil Postman smiles disarmingly and counters with a question - one he thinks educators ought to tackle before barging head-on into technology's "onslaught.""Does this solve some problem...
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Why 'Green' Is No Longer Radical Twenty-Seven Years after First Earth Day, Environment Shapes Thinking Everywhere from Classroom to Boardroom
Environmental thinking has permeated American society from classrooms to corporate boardrooms, from church pulpits to the halls of Congress.Don't believe it? Consider this.Hardly anybody took notice the other day when Ralph Nader called the Pentagon...
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