The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from September 14, 2000

A Backlash to 'Bully' America ; Other Nations Increasingly Unite in Criticizing US Clout, as Washington Wields Unparalleled Power on World Stage
Rarely in history has a country been as powerful as the United States is today. And that may be taking a toll on the rest of the world. While the US expands its global reach - militarily, economically, and culturally - other countries are increasingly...
After a Forest Fire, It's the Thrill of the Hunt for This Forest- Service Archaeologist
At first glance, Bill Matthews appears to be on post-wildfire clean-up duty. He reaches into the back of his white, government- issue pickup truck, pulls out a broom, then walks across the scorched earth to a particular patch of blackened dirt and begins...
A Small Tribe Battles Big Oil
Roberto Prez, an U'wa Indian from a potentially oil-rich patch of northern Colombia, has something he wants the world to hear: "A culture is a nonrenewable resource." His message - faint though it was amid all the ballyhoo and speechmaking - was carried...
Austria Waltzes Back into EU Good Graces ; the EU Dropped Diplomatic Sanctions on Vienna Tuesday. Were They Effective?
Austrians cheered, and political leaders elsewhere in Europe breathed quiet sighs of relief yesterday, as Vienna emerged from seven months of diplomatic sanctions, ending an unprecedented crisis in the ranks of the European Union. But the question of...
Best of the Western World's Nonfiction, Ca. 1909
The Harvard Classics were selected and edited by Charles W. Eliot, Harvard's president from 1869 to 1909. The books were designed to fit on a five-foot shelf. The 50 volumes comprise these writers and titles: 1. Benjamin Franklin, John Woolman, William...
Beyond Wood Shop: The New Tech Ed
As nor'easterly winds whip a tidal swell up into the Bay River's blackwater creeks, seven fishermen clamber into the Miss PCHS, fire her diesel, and steer the 33-foot shrimp trawler out toward broad and murky Pamlico Sound. The crew uses winches and...
Building Beauty beneath Colorado Sky
Making a university a special world - one that fits into this century but stands for the past and the future - is an art unto itself. The University of Colorado, Boulder, has been considered, architecturally, one of the loveliest in the nation, but now...
Can the UN Perform?
The photograph is striking: it shows 180 world leaders massed together during the United Nations' recent Millennium Summit. The leaders had all signed a statement favoring peace, democracy, and the welfare of children. Do we think, therefore, that we...
Catholics and Jews Show Different Faces toward Interfaith Dialogue ; Eye on Religion
At the heart of interfaith dialogue is how religions view one another. The past year has chalked up several interfaith milestones, which have begun putting to rest centuries of misunderstanding and animosity between Christians and Jews, and drawn some...
Church No Sanctuary from Crime
When three armed robbers burst into St. Matthew's Anglican Traditional Church 20 minutes into the Sunday morning service, Sheena Shirley dropped to her knees and began praying the "Our Father." As one of the robbers pressed the barrel of his gun against...
Clarity on Global Warming
Human understanding of climate change is subject to profound uncertainties about causes, effects, and rates of change. The international community formed a groundbreaking framework for dealing with global warming in the 1992 Climate Change Convention,...
Clinton Opens Diplomatic Door to India
India is a country on the fence. On one hand, it could become a US partner and bring stability to South Asia. Or, as President Clinton has warned, it could fall into a nuclear confrontation with its neighbor to the west, Pakistan. When Prime Minister...
Controlling the Flood of Genetic Information
With the completion of a "rough draft" of the entire human genome in June, government and corporate scientists have assembled enough genetic code to fill 2,000 computer diskettes. Now, the scientific footrace shifts from spelling out the seemingly...
Enrollment Surges at Faith-Based Colleges ; Boom Comes in Reaction to a Perceived Decline in Morality, Culture of Materialism
While a senior last spring at a high school in Platte City, Mo., Elaine Brown had her eye on Southwest Missouri State University, the college her older brother attends. But a friend was visiting Missouri Baptist College in St. Louis, and Elaine hadn't...
Etc
HE COULD TRY WEIGHT-LIFTING When Anthony Annarino was sentenced to 2-1/2 years behind bars in a federal corruption case, he expected to do the time at a minimum- security prison. "Maybe," joked the former tax collector for the city of Providence, R.I.,...
Eureka! ; Bringing a Spiritual Perspective to Daily Life
That moment of wonder. It happened when the Archimedes Principle was discovered. When an apple purportedly fired Newton's imagination to define the laws of gravity. When it dawned on Einstein that E=mc2 (whatever that might mean to you or me). More recently,...
Even Julia Childs Turned a Few of These
One Good Turn: A Natural History of the Screwdriver and the Screw By Witold Rybczynski Scribner 173 pp., $22 What noncooking tool is probably found in more kitchen drawers than any other? The screwdriver. Although not big, it's very useful. It's also...
Halting Hate Haltingly
In both Europe and America, racist hate groups have become more than an embarrassing nuisance. They're seen as a threat to the task of creating a more tolerant society. A jury in Idaho last week slapped a multimillion dollar civil judgment on the leaders...
Here's a Question: Do Neutron Stars Bend Gravity?
According to Einstein's general relativity theory, material mass bends space and distorts time. If that mass is rotating, the theory says, it also drags nearby space-time around with it. NASA's Rossi X- ray observing satellite now is tantalizing astronomers...
House Races Go National ; in Close Contests, Issues and Fundraising Extend Far beyond a District's Boundaries
It's a blazing hot day, and California state Sen. Adam Schiff is thumping on doors, handing out brochures, and asking strangers for votes. But this would-be US congressman has one advantage that most challengers in Election 2000 don't - about $3.5 million...
'Ice on, Ice Off' and Climate
Five years ago this fall, a small international group of scientists gathered in a rustic cabin at a research station in northern Wisconsin to ask a question: Could records of freezing and thawing on lakes, ponds, and rivers be used to track changes in...
Media Violence May Be Easier Tarred Than Regulated ; as US Lawmakers Convene Hearings on Violence in the Entertainment Industry, but Their Options May Be Limited
To many, it seems like a no-brainer: Exposing children to excessive violence in movies, music, and video games may be harmful.But how to keep such entertainment away from the eyes and ears of youngsters is proving to be a vexing problem for would-be...
Mother Nature and Her Kids Reap Wild Oats
FRIEND OF THE EARTH By T. Coraghessan Boyle Viking 271 pp., $24.95 T. Coraghessan Boyle's new novel, "A Friend of the Earth," is a satire about radical environmentalists. The day I finished reading it, the United Nations weather agency announced they'd...
My Decades-Long Journey of Five Feet
This is not about Harry Potter. But I have a reason for comforting all the young bookworms and consenting adults who've discovered that Harry's latest adventure weighs in at 734 pages, twice as many as "Huckleberry Finn." I've been living with and...
Rough Road Ahead for Britain's Prime Minister
Nationwide fuel blockades in Britain this week caused vast traffic tie-ups, threatening to bring the country to a standstill. But the blockades, to protest the highest gas prices in Europe, are only one in a series of problems facing Prime Minister...
Somalia's New President Works to Build Peace
As Somalia's first president in 10 years, Abdiqassim Salad Hassan faces a unique situation: He has no office or administrative structure in place. He has no police to enforce his authority in a land famous for its warlords' battles. And neither did he...
Steps toward Peace in Sudan
Thanks for highlighting the dreadful abduction of women and children as slaves in Sudan ("In Sudan, childhoods of slavery," Aug. 22). To stop Khartoum's tolerance of slavery, air attacks on civilian and relief-agency targets, use of food as a weapon,...
The Monitor Guide to the Bestsellers
The Monitor's Guide to Bestsellers HARDCOVER NONFICTION 1. THE BEAR AND THE DRAGON by Tom Clancy, Putnam, $28.95 (Last week 1, Weeks on list 1) What happens when the world's most populous nation borders one with the world's largest undeveloped landmass?...
The Tough Choice of Living in the Chosen Land
A Little Too Close to God: The Thrills and Panic of a Life in Israel By David Horovitz Alfred A. Knopf 311 pp., $26 Israel, like America, was built by pioneers chasing a dream. The early Israelis, like early Americans, had to push aside - sometimes...
Today's Story Line
Globalization has many faces. In Melbourne, Australia, demonstrators this week blocked the entrance to the Asia-Pacific World Economic Forum, a gathering of New Economy business leaders. Protesters condemned corporations, saying they exploit workers...
USA
The disputes within the Reform Party moved a step closer to at least formal resolution as the Federal Election Commission decided which of two rival presidential candidates should receive matching federal campaign funds. By a 5-to-1 preliminary vote,...
Wildlife Biologists Give Genetics Increasing Role in Species Conservation
Genetic fingerprints, they're not just for people anymore. They are creeping into the wild, helping biologists understand and conserve rare and endangered species. As in humans, a little reveals a lot in this brave new genetic age. One hair follicle,...
World
A fleet of 100 fuel tankers with police escorts left blockaded refineries to supply Britain's 13,000 gas stations and refuel emergency services as the nation entered the sixth day of its national crisis. Even as truck drivers, farmers, and small business...