The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from February 23, 2001

Argentine Romance Puts Crown Prince in Dutch ; Holland's Parliament Is Balking at the Prospect of a Royal Father- In-Law with Ties to Argentina's Brutal Military Dictatorship
History seems to be repeating itself in the Netherlands, where a regal romance is raising a royal ruckus. For weeks, debate has raged over who will succeed Queen Beatrix, after a group of members of parliament said they would not endorse a marriage...
Bing Is Back - as a Swingin' Jazz Man ; Crosby Was a Musical Innovator, Says Biographer
Tony Bennett once called Bing Crosby "the forgotten man" of American music. Now one award-winning jazz critic is making sure that doesn't happen. In his new biography "Bing Crosby: A Pocketful of Dreams - The Early Years, 1903-1940" (Little, Brown,...
Candidates Should Be the Focus of Reform
The Marc Rich pardon should not "impel campaign finance reform," as your Feb. 20 editorial "Pardon My Pardon?" states. It should instead impel political candidate reform. Why should we accept that politicians are corruptible and that money corrupts?...
'Chocolat' Director Masters Art of Taking Novel to Screen
An Oscar nomination for the French fable "Chocolat" has surprised several critics and delighted others. Some suggest that its appeal lies in the distinctive work of its Swedish director, Lasse Hallstrom: deep emotion rooted in a keenly observed reality....
Clinton's Suspect Pardons ; 'Pardongate' Sours Ex-President's Legacy, His Wife's Image, and Public View of Politics
Bill Clinton's friends have often described him as a tornado who roars through people's lives. Today, for possibly the first time in his career, it is he who seems helpless and trapped in a whirling funnel cloud of political controversy. Shorn of...
Clubs Struggle to Meld Safety and Nightlife ; A Rise in Violence - and High-Profile Cases like That of 'Puffy' Combs - Has Nightclubs Upping Security
A block from the buzzing neon lights of Times Square stands a plain, nondescript doorway. Outside it plays a scene familiar to nightclubs across America: Square-shouldered men in jackets stand guard at velvet ropes, screening patrons as they wait...
Early Bush Job Rating: Gentleman's B-Minus ; President Rates Well on Moral Leadership, Less Trusted on Medicare or Social Security
Americans, watching the Bush White House with mixed emotions, give the new president an overall grade of B-minus after one month in office. A new nationwide survey asked a cross section of Americans to assign President Bush letter grades in nine areas...
England Confronts 'Globesity' ; Obesity Levels in England Could Reach Those of the US within a Decade, According to a New British Study
Levels of obesity in England have tripled in the past 20 years, with 1 in 5 adults here now seriously overweight, according to a study released last week by the National Audit Office. England is just one example, experts here say, of how the conveniences...
Fewer Attempt Border Hide-and-Seek
The scene on the outskirts of Douglas could be something out of cold-war Europe. There is the wall - taller than two grown men - rising dark and monstrous from a 200-yard-wide border zone stripped of vegetation. There are the agents, sitting in their...
For Bush II, a Different Iraq
Pentagon officials, explaining why the raid on Iraqi radar and control sites was launched on Friday while President Bush was in Mexico, said that the Muslim work holiday was chosen to avoid hitting Chinese military officers and civilians working on...
Four Screens Capture Four Points of View ; Mike Figgis's Roots in Experimental Theater Inspired Radical, Improvisational 'Time Code'
Mike Figgis has always been an artistic experimenter, but with "Time Code" he broke his own record for boldness. Released to theaters last year and now available on video and DVD, it's one of the most radical films ever to come from a major studio...
India Counts to a Billion, One by One ; Where More Than Half Are 'Working Poor,' This Census Will Show Where Progress Was Made
Hiking up their saris to wind down narrow alleys split by open sewer trenches, Sunita Sherma and Nirmal Rautan are spending most of their afternoons this month in slums north of the city. Part of an army of 2 million census workers, they knock on...
In Luge Land, German Women Rule
Silke Kraushaar can lay claim to being the fastest woman on sled rails. Last week she won the women's World Cup in luge (sledding) at Lake Placid, N.Y., for the second time in three years. She is the reigning Olympic champion in the sport. In Germany,...
Iraq Trades Its Way into Arab Fold ; on Jan. 31, Syria and Iraq Signed a Free-Trade Pact Worth $1Billion, Following the Reopening of Shared Oil Pipeline
For a leader the US has tried to "isolate," Iraqi President Saddam Hussein is achieving remarkable success in using trade to rebuild his relationships in the Middle East. Countries such as Egypt, Turkey, and Syria are doing business with Iraq for...
Judy Garland's Trip through Oz ; Single-Mom Show 'Kate Brasher' Shines; 'Boycott' Is a Sensitive Civil- Rights Drama
CBS wants its share of the female audience, so the network is loading up its Saturday night lineup (opposite the NBC's "XFL") with shows like "That's Life," about a 30something woman going back to college. And now Kate Brasher (Feb. 24, 9-10 p.m.)...
Liberals Make Their Move to Sway the Party ; Left-Wing Democrats Hope to Shape a Response to Bush
Politics, like nature, abhors a vacuum. As Democrats struggle to fill the leadership void left by President Clinton, the left wing has a clear opening to wrest the party from its centrist moorings, back to a more progressive agenda. With a base of...
Movie Guide
Ratings and comments by David Sterritt and Monitor staff Staff comments reflect the sometimes diverse views of at least three other moviegoers. Information on violence, drugs, sex/nudity, and profanity is compiled by the Monitor panel. STAR RATINGS...
Musical Chairs ; America's Top Orchestras Are Handing Their Batons to 'Name Brand' Maestros. Will Any Make More Daring Choices?
Orchestral conductors have been taking over American cities with the sweep of four-star generals on a military campaign. The appointment of Christoph Eschenbach at the Philadelphia Orchestra in January was followed quickly by the news that Lorin Maazel...
My Vote for Common Cents
Big issues always get the big-time coverage. Right now most of the national headlines are dominated by tensions in the Middle East, proposed tax cuts by the Bush administration, and submarine safety procedures. With so many pundits devoting all their...
Raising Schools from an 'F'
Accountability and vouchers have been the catchwords of the Bush education plan. But they don't tell the whole story. Accountability, typically in the form of statewide testing, makes it possible to identify schools as failing. Vouchers or other sanctions...
Schools Derailing Violence
The biggest education story of 2001 may be what didn't happen during school hours. In the past month, almost-weekly plots to violently disrupt schools have been foiled. From Kansas to New York, pipe bombs have been discovered, arms caches unearthed,...
Surf's Up: First Waveof Internet Fatigue
It was bound to happen. Those two words that crop up everywhere by themselves are starting to appear in public together: "Internet" and "fatigue" have paired up, creating a notion that, only a few years ago, would have been unthinkable. In fact,...
The Subtle Art of the 'Snedrick'
Mention of "snedricks" caused some readers to write, "What are 'snedricks'?" It is tragically true that movies, radio, and TV have impoverished our down-Maine lingo by ridding us of many descriptive gems that once embellished and beautified our speech,...
USA
The investigation into former President Clinton's 11th-hour actions widened amid revelations that a brother-in-law collected as much as $400,000 for helping to secure a pardon and a prison commutation for two clients. The ex-president and Sen. Hillary...
Winter Nears Its Tipping Point
At a certain point late in February, there comes a day when you realize that you are pivoting. The junipers may still be shagged with ice. Ice-fishing shacks still colonize the lakes. No one yet dares to remove their snow tires. However, you can...
World
Expectations were low in the Middle East for new Secretary of State Colin Powell's weekend trip to the region - the first by a senior US official since violence erupted in the West Bank and Gaza Strip last Sept. 28. Powell planned to offer no proposals...