The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from March 21, 2002

Afghanistan Takes a Holiday ; with the Celebration of Nawruz This Week, Cultural Traditions Banned by the Taliban Are Being Revived
If the Taliban tried to lock culture in a closet, Afghanistan is about to have its coming-out party. Nawruz, the Afghan New Year which began last night with feasts and all-night parties, is a popular holiday that the fundamentalist Taliban banned because...
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Africa's Grand Bargain
All was not lost in Zimbabwe's rigged election last week. Africa's two richest and most powerful nations, South Africa and Nigeria, decided to punish Zimbabwe on Tuesday for a flawed presidential vote. Their courageous stand will help renew a promise...
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A Governor's Race Better Than Sox Tickets ; the Governor-Mom Exits the Fray, an Olympic 'Hero' Enters, and Mass. Democrats Quiver
The Massachusetts governor's race, not always close but always entertaining, now looks like it will be one of the marquee matchups in the nation this fall. The sudden entrance of Olympics organizer Mitt Romney into the race and the dramatic departure...
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Clergy, Abuse, and Jail Time ; Prosecutions Are Rare, but 75 Priests or Ministers Have Faced Convictions, Prison
Despite the common perception that clergy who sexually assault children are almost never punished, more than 70 priests and ministers have been sent to prison for child molestation since 1985.While this still represents a small percentage of the overall...
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Don't Touch That Dial ; Media Saturation Is the Condition of Modern Life
Almost all the nonjournalists I know complain about how the media portray their neighborhood, city, state, nation, or planet in a distorted way. Yet those same complainants quote information from the media all the time, as if it were accurate. How else,...
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Few Vote in Primaries - despite Patriotic Mood ; Tuesday's Turnout Was Low, Even in States Where Key Governorships Were at Stake
With the first batch of primary elections completed in Illinois, Texas, and California, a glaring exception is emerging to the post- Sept. 11 surge in patriotic activity: voting. Despite evidence that Americans are now more civically engaged than they've...
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Fill in the Blanks with 'Body' Text ; in the Spirit of Today's Much-Needed Conservation, the Home Forum Has Saved Many Words below in the Belief That You Know What They Are
William (not his real name) thought he had a (1)____________ for news. So he kept it to the grindstone and stuck it into other people's business. This caused a raised (2)____________ or two. But he always smiled in the (3)____________ of adversity, even...
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Flirting with Disaster, and Dating It, Too
When my best friend offered to set me up on a blind date several years ago, I breathed a heavy sigh and prepared for disaster. Ever since high school, after all, my track record with dating had been something less than Olympic. I suppose it started in...
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Goal: Eat at Every McDonald's in America ; A Survey of Passionate Pursuits - the Hobbies and Collections That Define Americans
Based on the same premise as Stud Terkel's magnum opus, "Working" - that there is something to be learned from the way Americans spend their time - "The Banana Sculptor, the Purple Lady, and the All- Night Swimmer" is about how Americans play. It's an...
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In Pakistan, Americans as Targets ; Pakistani Police Detained 30 Illegal Immigrants Following the Apparently Anti-American Church Attack in Islamabad
The attacker at the Pakistan International Church arrived here Sunday dressed like many of the other worshipers. He was cleanshaven, and he wore a Western-style shirt, pants, and jacket rather than the traditional Pakistani garb known as salwar kameez....
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IRS Seminars, IDs Help Illegal Immigrants Pay US Taxes ; Critics Say One Federal Agency Is Accommodating Lawbreakers That Another Agency Is Trying Ferret Out
It's been just an hour, but tax counselors at a recent IRS seminar at an immigrant community center have already seen 100 people and are facing an overflow crowd in the waiting room hoping for tax help. These people aren't in a quandary over new tax...
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Jagged History of Jadeite ; the Precious Stone Once Inspired the Plunder of China - Now, the Virtual Enslavement of Burmese
Diamonds may be a girl's best friend, but jadeite is the world's most expensive gem. Found only in a tiny area of northern Burma (Myanmar), jadeite has been treasured for thousands of years. Distinguished chemically from ordinary jade, jadeite is a silicate...
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Letters
Putting a stop to red-light runners Regarding: "As stoplight cameras spread, drivers see red" (March 19): Hurray for a device that exposes traffic violators and clearly lowers the number of red-light-running violations where these cameras are being used....
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Monterrey Plans to Turn Rotting Garbage into Electricity ; Latin America's First of Its Kind Power Plant Is Expected to Be Done by the End of the Year
When President George Bush and Mexican President Vicente Fox meet today in Mexico's third-largest city for the United Nations International Conference on Financing for Development, local garbage probably won't be a hot topic of conversation. Yet Monterrey...
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More Aid, More Democracy
In highlighting the need for political reform in developing countries, President Bush's call for a "new compact for global development" will deepen the discourse at this week's UN summit in Monterrey, Mexico. Most of the debate leading up to Monterrey...
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Movie Musicals Are Back, but Think MTV
Oscar, that fickle golden statuette, hasn't gone home with a musical film since 1968, when "Oliver!" won Best Picture. Now, the surprise box-office success ($173 million worldwide) and Best Picture nomination of "Moulin Rouge" have raised the prospect...
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Once Eager to Join EU, Turkey Grows Apprehensive
Turkish commentators have been saying for months that the country's rapid efforts to bring its political structures into line with EU requirements would eventually hit a wall. But when the crunch came, it took a form that few expected. In mid-February,...
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Powerful 'Promises' to Mideast Children
Some films thrust burning issues before the eyes of the world: "On the Beach" about nuclear war, "Silkwood" about cover-up of nuclear contamination, "Dead Man Walking" about capital punishment. "Promises," the small masterpiece nominated for this year's...
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Scientist-Turned-Cleric Wins Templeton Prize in Religion
Like many successful professionals, John Polkinghorne didn't think he had time to cram one more thing into his busy schedule. But his wife persuaded him to attend a Bible class near their home in Cambridge, England. It was a decision that changed his...
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Some Say the World Will End in Fire, Some Say in Verse ; Did a Few Lines of Poetry Defuse the Cuban Missile Crisis?
Set solidly in a Midwestern college during the 1960s, "The Translator" seems at first a major departure from the magical realism that John Crowley's audience has come to expect. But in fact, the author hasn't moved. The story of going to school near...
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Spring Breakers Trade Sun for Social Work ; Students Help at Ground Zero, as Part of a Movement to Spend Vacations Volunteering
Marilyn McDow had planned to spend her spring break baking at the beach on South Padre Island in Texas. Instead, she's standing in a chilly drizzle in New York at the edge of the pit where the World Trade Center once stood. "When I heard about this trip...
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The Art Behind Modern Behavior
About 77,000 years ago, in a cave overlooking the Indian Ocean, a group of early people were using bone tools for leatherwork, grinding red ocher into powder, probably for use as body decoration, and even carving geometric designs. At their site, about...
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The Marketplace for Poetry
Into our e-mailbox comes word from a "shocked" reader that Yankee Magazine has decided to drop its "venerable Poetry Page." This has prompted some thought on the state of poetry publishing, especially as we move toward April, National Poetry Month in...
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What's in the Water? ; Better Detection Tools Reveal Possible Ecological 'Villains' - from Hormones to Fire Retardants - in US Streams and Rivers
From its headwaters at Echo Lake in Hopkinton, Mass., the Charles River glides past yards, saturates wetlands, and slips under highways before emptying into Boston Harbor. Over the years, this 80-mile odyssey through 23 cities and towns has left what...
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Zoom, Zoom ... Wait a Minute!
Auto manufacturers should not be allowed to get away with a new round of "go faster" advertising slogans reminiscent of the early '90s. Safety advocates a decade ago successfully persuaded carmakers to "cease and desist." Now, it appears they, and Congress,...
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