The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from March 22, 2002

Al Qaeda's Ploy: Parry and Run ; as US Officials Declare Operation Anaconda a Success, Al Qaeda Is Regrouping with Fresh Recruits and Funds
The slate at the jagged edges of the cave, on the main road that marks the start of the now-famous Shah-e Kot Mountains, feathers in shards that can be easily plucked away. It is difficult to fathom that some of the most-wanted terrorists on earth lurked...
A Messy, Yet 'Beautiful' Year
What I like best about this year's sweepstakes is that it isn't neat and tidy enough to make predictions easy. The Best Picture nominees have little in common. There's the small-town drama of "In the Bedroom" and the posh-estate satire of "Gosford Park."...
Beijing Fends off Monsters on Its Steppes ; Giant Spring Dust Storms Are Sweeping Down from the North into Beijing, Prompting Plans to Build a Great Wall of Trees
It is born in the Gobi desert. Each spring it sucks up fine sands, growing more malevolent as it inhales dust over the bald steppes of Inner Mongolia and slouches toward Beijing. Who says monsters don't exist? We speak of Beijing's spring dust storms...
Big-Time Teams Strut into Sweet 16
Coach Rob Lanier got down on a knee, looked into the faces of his players, and screamed at the top of his lungs. "Don't be afraid," he yelled. "You can win!" He screamed it a second time, a third time, and a fourth time, until his eyes looked like they...
Bush Heads South to a Troubled Continent ; President, on First Trip to South America, Will Push Free Trade, Democratic Reforms
If George Bush's idea of presidential travel were to hit the trouble spots, he'd be using his first trip to South America this weekend to visit Colombia, Venezuela, and Argentina. On his first official visit to South America, the president will be stopping...
Central America Ambivalent toward Free Trade ; Bush Travels to El Salvador Sunday to Discuss a Long-Awaited Regional Trade Pact
President Bush arrives here Sunday and expectations are running high. Leaders in the region have long wanted a free-trade agreement with the United States. Ever since Bush expressed interest earlier this year - and then announced his upcoming visit -...
Dormant Terror Groups Awaken ; Attacks in Peru and Italy Indicate Post-9/11 Boldness
Two terror attacks on two continents this week, attributed to groups the authorities thought they had beaten long ago, suggest just how hard it is to win a war against terrorism. On Wednesday in Lima, Peru, in the worst example of anti- American violence...
For Sharon, Poetry Makes Policy ; Uri Zvi Greenberg's Poetry Has Emerged as a Cultural Touchstone of the Israeli Right
Hours before meeting with US special envoy Anthony Zinni last Thursday, Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon sprinted up to the stage of the Jerusalem Theater to thunderous applause. He thanked the audience, taking special care to acknowledge the soldiers...
Genius Unites a Father and Daughter ; Orazio and Artemisia Gentileschi Put Their Own Stamp on Carvaggio's Vision and Created Masterpieces
She was the greatest female artist of her time. He was regarded as the link between Caravaggio and Vermeer. Now they are together for the first time in a major exhibition: "Orazio and Artemisia Gentileschi: Father and Daughter Painters in Baroque Italy,"...
How Evidence Stacks Up on Military Tribunals ; Some Say That Due-Process Protections Are Insufficient, Although the Pentagon Has Made Some Changes
When President Bush authorized the creation of military tribunals for suspected terrorists last November, he insisted they would provide "full and fair" trials. Exactly how full and how fair is now coming into sharper focus. And as new details are disclosed,...
Inflation Remains Quiet, Keeping Pressure off the Fed ; Lack of Price Hikes Suggests Policymakers Can Keep Interest Rates Low through Spring
The nation's inflation rate remains frozen in place - at practically the lowest level in forty years - at a time when the economy as a whole is thawing out quickly. Economists believe this low inflation rate - at about a 2.5 percent annual pace - should...
Jaws It's Not, but New US Resident Is No Pal
It hasn't exactly reached Spielbergian infamy, but a new invader - carnivorous and packing nasty venom in its spines - is prowling the waters off the East Coast, causing scientists to scratch their heads and divers and fishermen to think twice. East...
Look Who's Up for an Oscar! ; Animation Moves into the Spotlight with an Award of Its Own
Even before the first-ever Oscar for best animated film is handed out Sunday night, there's a touch of controversy about the award. Why are there only three nominees, when most award categories have five? Why do the three contenders - "Shrek," "Monsters,...
Man at the Center of Catholics' Maelstrom
He's close to the Bush family, yet talks on occasion with Fidel Castro. He has supported homes for AIDS patients in neighborhoods that didn't want them. He once faced death threats for his civil rights stand in segregated Mississippi - but has prevented...
Money in Politics: A New Route ; Campaign-Finance Law Reduces the Role of Parties, but Creates Funding Back- Channels
It took seven years and the most protracted legislative struggle since the civil rights movement to get a new campaign-finance bill through the Congress. Now, the hard part begins. After President Bush signs the new bill into law - as he has said he...
Movie Guide
NEW RELEASES E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial (PG) Director: Steven Spielberg. With Henry Thomas, Drew Barrymore, Dee Wallace Stone, Peter Coyote. (120 min.) Sterritt *** Spielberg's much-acclaimed fantasy, about a 10-year- old boy and a childlike space visitor...
'Oklahoma!' Leaps Back on Stage ; but Everything's Up to Date in This Delightful Broadway Revival
Oh, what a beautiful revival! "Oklahoma!," the landmark 1943 musical masterwork by Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II (the first of their nine collaborations), is back on Broadway in a historic and overwhelmingly delightful new production. Brilliantly...
Oscar's Elegant Home - in a Shopping Mall
Memo to Nicole, Halle, Sissy, Renee, and Judi: Think Scarlett O'Hara. After all, the restrooms in the Oscars' new home are built to allow two women in hoop skirts to pass each other without so much as touching. Don't forget the parasols, either. The...
Pool-Water Taffy - Come 'N' Get It!
I commend Defense Secretary Rumsfeld for his recent decision to pull the plug on the newly formed Office of Strategic Influence. News reports claimed the Pentagon wanted OSI to mount an aggressive effort in the Islamic world to fight negative feelings...
Pulling Pols off the Payroll
DOLLAR by one less dollar, the nation slowly is squeezing the amount of money being spent to influence the actions of Congress and presidents. The latest effort, a campaign- finance-reform bill passed by Congress on Wednesday, after seven years of effort,...
Sports Gambling - an Air Ball
Sadly, millions of fans glued to college basketball games during the "March Madness" of the NCAA tournament have more at stake than good old school spirit or love of the sport. They have money on the games. Such gambling usually takes place through office...
Taking Risks for Good of Others ; Matthew Modine Finds Fulfillment in the Hard-Edged but Humane 'Redeemer'
"Paul Freeman is like those people who run into burning buildings to save others," says actor Matthew Modine about his character in Redeemer (USA Channel, March 26, 9-11 p.m.). The story is written by Los Angeles Times columnist James Ricci, who taught...
The Maine State of Financial Affairs
To most of us, prosperity is measured by little arrows on the TV screen showing if the stock market is up or down. It's hard to realize some people are rich and care about that. Several related narratives come to mind that I set down for didactic purposes...
Washington's Leak Soup
The Ship of State, it has been said, is the only kind of ship that leaks mainly from the top. Presidents hate unauthorized leaks, which they regard as limiting their freedom of action. President Nixon started on his road to ruin by employing a crew of...
What Cheney Learned on His Mideast Tour
Vice President Cheney seems to have failed in his hurried mission of instructing Middle Eastern leaders on the need for military action to bring down Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein. But the trip succeeded admirably in teaching him five basic lessons about...
Witness to Spring on the Mountain
Spring comes late 8,000 feet up in northern Colorado's Rocky Mountains where we lived. I was alert that spring, ready to answer the question, which flowers bloom first in the Rockies? I thought mountain ball cactuses were the earliest wildflowers to...