The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from December 5, 2000

Beef Crisis Alters European Appetites ; This Week EU Leaders to Discuss How to Curb the 'Mad Cow' Disease
When Alain Ducasse, the most honored chef in France, opens his new restaurant here later this month, one longtime staple of French cuisine will be barred from his kitchen: beef. At the other end of the culinary spectrum, Kentucky Fried Chicken opened...
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Chile's Moves to Reconcile Its Tortured Past ; A Court Ordered Augusto Pinochet's Arrest on Friday, but Now the Judge Is Being Pursued by Foes
The roller-coaster ride of pursuing justice for Augusto Pinochet has hit another dip. Now, calls are mounting for the judge shepherding the murder and kidnapping case against the former dictator to step down. Judge Juan Guzman, who is investigating...
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City Tries Paying Teachers for Results ; Cincinnati Has Become the First US City to Link Teachers' Pay to Performance
It's been called the last frontier of school reform: performance pay for teachers. Teachers groups have opposed it as vigorously as students protesting a pop quiz. Even citizen support for the idea has been tepid. But here in Cincinnati, a new...
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Class Notes on the Web? Just an Updated Version of an Old Practice
A number of college students are finding there's an easy way to make some money while pursuing their studies. Internet companies will pay them about $300 to take notes for a course. The notes are then posted online, free to any user. The company earns...
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Closed for Business ; High-Profile Charter-School Failures Raise Concerns about Loose Regulation
There was nothing gentle about the way parents, teachers, and students were informed that the Academy of Austin Charter School had closed. They simply arrived at the Texas school one morning last December to find an empty, locked building. Fortunately,...
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Court Gives Bush a Gift of Time ; US Supreme Court Sets Aside a Florida Ruling Permitting Selective Manual Recounts, Narrowing Gore's Legal Options
The grains of sand in Al Gore's hourglass have dwindled to a precious few. It is now almost a month since election day of the closest presidential contest in American history. Legally speaking, Vice President Gore has hope. There are still possible...
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Gas Energizes Nova Scotia ; Thanks to Bountiful Energy Troves, Nova Scotia Recorded a 5.2 Percent Economic Growth Last Year
In this sprawling rural region whose scalloped coastline harbors one sparklingly picturesque fishing village after another, life was anything but idyllic. Almost all men worked the same job: put out to sea in search of cod, haddock, and halibut. "By...
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Guides to Top Colleges Warn, 'Don't Be Blinded by the Halo'
Ask a top high school student where he or she expects to go to college, and the answer is often a single, instantly recognizable word: Harvard - or Dartmouth or Yale or ... any of the Ivies, really. It's an understandable inclination: Shoot for "the...
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How Illinois Is Moving Kids out of Foster-Care Limbo ; the State's Child-Welfare System, Long Maligned, Has Become a Model for Reform by Encouraging Adoption
Until recently, Carol and Melvin AuBuchon's home, in this middle- class town just east of St. Louis, epitomized much of what was wrong the Illinois foster-care system. Over the course of 17 years, the couple has helped to raise 21 foster kids - and...
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Imagine a Peaceful Wave of Humanity in Israel
Nothing seems to be working to end the conflict in the Middle East. With the continuing violence in Israel, Gaza, and the West Bank, Palestinians appear to have few options other than sullen capitulation or the continuation of fruitless conflict and...
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Indonesia's President Backs Away from Tolerance ; Security Forces Clamped Down on Separatists in Two Provinces This Weekend
Some 10 people were killed in clashes between separatists and Indonesian security forces over the weekend, as Jakarta followed through on a promised crackdown against separatism. Four senior independence leaders were jailed as security forces pulled...
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Law Schools Renew a Drive for Diversity
Lawyers may not score well in public-opinion surveys, but at some point, everybody needs one - whether to write up a will, file a suit, or defend against criminal charges. Nine times out of 10 in the United States, the face of that lawyer is white....
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Legal Eagles Take Wing in High-School Law Classes
When students were hesitant to stage a sit-in at Benjamin Banneker Academic High School, they knew where to turn for advice: the kids in the Street Law class. Equipped with information about their First Amendment rights, they went forward with the...
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Life Isn't Fair, but What about Democracy? ; History Shows Perceived Injustices in the System Often Lead to Improvements
Fairness. It's a fundamental concept in American democracy, yet nearly half the country currently holds that, however the presidential election turns out, the count in Florida will not have been fair or accurate. That, say some observers, is a dangerous...
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Prayer for Africa ; Bringing a Spiritual Perspective to Daily Life
The news out of Africa has touched me deeply. An AIDS epidemic, war and famine, and the great inequity between people's resources and opportunities. I am yearning to help. A check to a relief organization is an important contribution, but I've wanted...
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Prepping for the Citizen Test
When Cham Omot moved to the United States after his Sudanese village was destroyed in the country's 20-year civil war, he spoke no English and knew little about what it meant to be an American. But five years later, the Minneapolis resident could...
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Ranchers Battle Remnant of the Old West ; Texas Cowmen Have Seen a Surge in Cattle Rustling This Fall, Thanks to High Beef Prices and Fewer Cows
Richard Neidig knew something was wrong the minute he drove up to his cattle pen near McDade, Texas. For one thing, there was a strange set of tire tracks inside the gate. For another, the seven heifers that used to be in the pen were gone. So Mr....
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Ranking the Presidents
Back in December of 1971, I said to a Monitor colleague, "How in the world am I ever going to keep it going week after week?" I was referring to this column, which managing editor Earl Foell and chief editorial writer Joseph Harsch had asked me to...
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The Antique Uniform of Business
Men's business suits - a jacket, shirt, tie, trousers, and often a vest - have been around for almost two centuries. Suits haven't changed much. The modern suit sprang onto the scene in the early 1800s because of two things: the interest in classical...
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Today's Story Line:
No issue dominates the European media as much as concerns over "mad cow" disease. Yesterday, European officials banned all meat and bone meal as fodder for livestock in 15 countries. Such food safety concerns are fast-forwarding a dinner-table trend...
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Working Clothes
Humans are excellent adapters. They live happily in rain forests, the Arctic, even in desert lands. One reason humans can thrive in so many climates is the clothing they wear. Specialized clothing, cleverly suited to weather and tasks, keeps people...
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Young Beggars Try to Be Bakers, Meet Red Tape
If a group of homeless Mexican children - against all odds - figured out a way to support themselves by starting their own bakery, you'd think that politicians of every stripe would jump to support it. Think again. All the stainless-steel kitchen...
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