The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from November 14, 2001

African-American Cooking beyond Chitlins
William Faulkner once explained that he tried to evoke the past, present, and future in every sentence that he wrote. The same could be said for Joe Brown. Instead of words, though, Mr. Brown uses ingredients. And instead of novels, he creates meals....
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An English Major's Secrets for Success
"This does not fit into my life plan," commented a member of my staff when faced with another one of those tasks that fill adult life without seeming to give it meaning. I suddenly realized that what I do day to day does not fit my life plan, either,...
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Another Plane Crash Rocks a Shattered Town ; Already in Mourning, the Rockaways Become New York City's Latest Ground Zero
On weekdays, Rockaway Rugby Club is the kind of joint where guys come with weary eyes and grease-smudged clothes after a long day's work, hoping to unwind with friends. And like the Rockaway neighborhood itself, it's also a hangout for a lot of cops...
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Bombings Hit Unintended Target: European Opinion ; A Parliamentary Vote in Berlin This Week on Whether to Deploy German Troops Could Trigger a Political Crisis
President George Bush's declaration in September, "Either you are with us or you are against us," has sown confusion and dissension among many Europeans. "We are with the Americans and against terrorism, but we are also against war," says Alexandra Filipp,...
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Business & Finance
A new cut in crude-oil production, perhaps the deepest this year, appeared certain as representatives of OPEC member nations gathered in Vienna for a strategy meeting today aimed at pushing prices back into the cartel's target range. With futures prices...
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Crash Adds Urgency to Bill Bolstering Airport Security ; House and Senate May Cut a Deal This Week. Recent Lapses at Checkpoints Reveal Flaws in Current Screening System
Even before the crash of an American Airlines flight this week, pressure was building on Congress to quickly settle differences over a new aviation security plan. The measure - which became a top congressional priority on Sept. 11 - bogged down over...
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Freedom Fighters or Terrorists? ; Lebanese of All Stripes Praise Hizbullah for Ousting Israeli Army and Say They're Not Terrorists
Abdullah Qassir, who represents the Shia Muslim Hizbullah organization in the Lebanese parliament, is unimpressed with President Bush's executive order to freeze the group's financial assets. If anything, he takes pride in it. "We feel strong when the...
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Holiday Travel Plans Prevail despite Tragedy ; Many People Still Plan to Fly, but Doubts about Airline Safety Keep Some Seats Empty
With Thanksgiving, the nation's peak travel season, just a week away, many Americans appear ready to fly home for turkey and stuffing - regardless of the fiery crash of American Airlines Flight 587 in Queens on Monday. Travel agents report that, so far,...
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How Far Americans Would Go to Fight Terror ; in a Gauge of Public Values, a Majority Supports Assassination - and 1 in 4 Even Backs Use of Nuclear Arms
Americans' support for the war on terrorism is so firmly rooted that a solid majority would now back the assassination of foreign leaders to achieve victory. A new Christian Science Monitor/TIPP poll shows sizeable segments of the public support other...
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In Chauffeuring Teens, a Mom Racks Up Miles and Insights
Living in a rural area - five miles away from town and school, 12 miles from a movie theater, 30 miles from a reasonably good shopping area, and 90 miles from a mall - means spending a lot of time in the car. Frequently, I find myself cast in the role...
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Leger Celebrates a New Order
Once a painting is finished, what happens to it next doesn't always go down in history. Who owns it? Where is it hung? But at least two photographs show where "The Baluster," by French artist Fernand Leger, was immediately hung after he painted it in...
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Letters
Continued bombing vs. a humanitarian halt I disagree with Helena Cobban's opinion piece "Time for a humanitarian halt" (Nov. 8) and its contention that the US should declare a humanitarian timeout during the upcoming Muslim holy month of Ramadan. It...
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Letters - 'The Only True Heart-Talkers'
Before the anthrax scare, taking in the mail used to rank as a pleasant little routine. For most of us, it still does. Mail serves as a reassuring connection with the outside world. What friend might send an unexpected note? Everyone can count on receiving...
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'Mocha Moms' Draw Support from One Another
At a time when some new mothers, at least, win praise from families and friends for staying home with an infant, black women hear a contrary message: Keep working, no matter what. Although new Census Bureau figures show that more mothers are staying...
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Mothers Who Choose to Stay Home ; Census Finds Fewer Mothers of Infants in Workforce - Reversing a 25- Year Trend
As a young career woman, Elizabeth Drew Scholl could not imagine a life without paid work. Armed with a master's degree, she landed a plum job, managing a $50 million capital campaign for one of Chicago's top cultural institutions, the Lincoln Park Zoo....
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Pentagon and Press Can Both Do Their Jobs
When I was State Department spokesman in the Reagan administration, Bernie Kalb, then diplomatic correspondent for one of the three major television networks, came to me to confirm what could have been a major scoop for him. He'd been tipped that an...
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Quality Moments Seen in Hindsight
When my children were young, I faced the same questions raised in the story at right: Work or stay home? And, if the latter, for how long? I was fortunate to be able to be at home or to work part time most of the years my sons were growing up. But was...
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Taliban Yield Kabul, but Not War ; Concern for Human Rights Follows the Swift Rebel Capture of the Capital Yesterday
Tears of joy - and sorrow - greeted Afghan rebel forces yesterday, as they seized the capital, Kabul, from the retreating Taliban militia. Rejecting all advice but their own, Northern Alliance rebels paused at the gates of the city - as promised - and...
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Terrorism's Africa Link
As the United States searches the earth for links between the Al Qaeda terrorist network and its sources of financial and logistical support, reports from West Africa are connecting Osama bin Laden to the collapsed states of Liberia and Sierra Leone....
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The Sweet Rewards of a Fruitful Season
Virginia and Dutch's house sat well back from the ridge road, on the edge of Nimshew Ridge, in the Sierras east of the Sacramento Valley. Their backyard, nestled into a forest of ponderosa pine trees and manzanita brush, supported four apple trees, three...
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This Fall, Wizards and Hobbits Rule the Silver Screen
America is off to see the wizard. And the hobbit. And the cyclops. After years of being labeled kiddie fare or languishing at the bottom of the rental bin, fantasy is now the movie genre du jour, and its timing couldn't be better. What started this summer...
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USA
Investigators were treating the crash of American Airlines Flight 587 in Queens, N.Y., as an accident, based on an initial evaluation of the cockpit voice recorder. But they had not ruled out sabotage. The airliner crashed into a residential area minutes...
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US Diplomacy Races to Catch Up to Rebel Gains ; with Rebels in Kabul, US Scrambles to Create Political and Peacekeeping Plans
The sweep of northern Afghanistan by US-backed rebel forces has far outpaced diplomatic plans for a broad-based Kabul government, raising the possibility of anarchy and a prolonged guerrilla war against remnants of Taliban troops. The Pentagon, while...
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'With or against Us' War Irks Many UN Nations ; Bush's Intention to Broaden the War beyond Afghanistan Fails to Galvanize UN
Until now, supporting the United States in its war against terrorists has been relatively easy for many members of the United Nations. But faultlines deepened in the international coalition this week when President Bush informed the UN General Assembly...
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World
Cheering Kabul residents welcomed Northern Alliance troops into the capital as their take-over of Afghanistan advanced with unexpected speed. The Taliban militia was pulling back to its base, Kandahar, but reports said that city's airport was the scene...
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