The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from July 3, 2002

Afghan Salang Pass: Enter at Your Own Risk ; Afghanistan's Critical Link between North and South Is in Dire Need of Promised Foreign Aid
When we arrive at the Salang Pass at 8:30 a.m., the cars are already lined up for nearly a mile outside the scariest black hole I have ever seen. I'm prepared for at least a nine-hour road-trip from Kabul to Mazar-e Sharif through what claims to be the...
A Kinder, Gentler America Still Prevails
A year ago, we were celebrating July 4 Independence Day in peacetime. The pending events of Sept. 11 would have seemed inconceivable. There were bad guys abroad, but the world was relatively quiescent. At home, the economy had been through some strain,...
A New Kind of Patriotism
On this July 4th, Americans are called to take a hard look at the meaning of patriotism and their own relationship to it. During the past year, a patriotic fervor spread across our great land: Flags adorned buildings and cars, donations were made to...
Around the World in 14 Days - Goaded by Glory
Steve Fossett, the history-making balloonist, couldn't have met George Mallory. Mallory was a mountaineer of 80 years ago. Everest was his dominion and obsession. He came from the groves of academia in England and wrote and thought poetically. Fossett...
A Thoughtful Fourth
This Fourth of July will be different. Not that there won't be fireworks and parades. Or that families won't gather for picnics, or bandstands ring with patriotic tunes. Americans know how to enjoy their national birthday. But the backdrop, inevitably,...
Avoiding a Water War
The politics of water threatens to wash away some of the current amity in US-Mexican relations. But with diligent effort, the two neighbors can start forging a more cooperative, less contentious future. The immediate need is for Mexico to at least begin...
Bush's Critics Find It Hard to Make Inroads ; Some Question His Handling of Terror War. Others Home in on the Economy's Woes
Chink. Chink. Chink. That's the sound of Democrats trying to chip away at President Bush's handling of the war on terrorism. Of all the issues before him, it is the one on which he gets the highest approval ratings and the one on which he has staked...
Counsel of a Humbler Sort
When the Rev. James Dittes joined the Yale Divinity School faculty in 1955, pastors were steadily leaving ministry to seek greater influence in the burgeoning fields of counseling. Armed with ordained standing, as well as a PhD in experimental psychology,...
Cutoffs to One, Home to Some
From outside my kitchen window, a wren trills a crescendo and flits amid the branches of the redbud tree. Suddenly, she lapses into her angry voice as she scolds one of my cats invading her territory. Somewhere in this copse, she must have a nest. A...
Don't Slander Your Parrot ; Attorney Argues That to Give Animals' Legal Rights Is Not Barking Mad
The National Zoo generated some unintended laughs in May when it argued that publicly releasing a giraffe's medical records would violate the animal's privacy. But in "Drawing the Line," attorney Steven Wise makes the case for granting even more fundamental...
Friendly Fire Deaths Divide US and Afghanistan ; Possible Killing of Dozens at Wedding Party Monday Is Latest Controversial Event
Civilian casualties allegedly caused by errant United States fire may be opening a serious rift between the new government of Afghanistan and its US protector. Tuesday, Afghan President Hamid Karzai called US officials into his office to express "grave...
How Many Enrons Are There? More Than People May Think. ; One-Quarter of Public Firms Have to Amend Reports after SEC Review - a Sign of Widespread Manipulation
It's one of the central questions behind the growing scandal in corporate America: Just how pervasive is the number fudging? Some believe the mistakes in financial reporting and accounting are limited to a handful of companies - an Enron here and a WorldCom...
Into Thin Air with Lipstick ; Leaving the Scary Wilderness of Family Life for Some Peace and Quiet
Henry David Thoreau went to suck the marrow out of life. Young Goodman Brown went to confront the devil. Little Red Riding Hood went to see her grandmother with those big teeth. Everybody's got a good reason for going into the woods. Hannah Blue, the...
Just a Little Less Litigation, Please
The way Phillip Howard sees it, his profession is helping to ruin America. Mr. Howard, an attorney, railed against trivial lawsuits and too much regulation in two 1990s bestsellers. Now, he's lining up some surprising political bedfellows to convince...
Letters
Internet tollbooths nurture creativity Regarding "Tollbooths of the mind" (June 27, Opinion): As the author laments the erecting of advertising "tollbooths" on the Internet and the rise of electronic publishing, he fails to recognize the practical realities...
Long-Term US Strategy Emerges out of Philippines ; as US Intervention against Rebel Group Ends, the Military Calls for More Missions
Just weeks before its scheduled conclusion, the US mission in the Southern Philippines - the Bush administration's largest military deployment outside Afghanistan - has accomplished almost all of its objectives. The Abu Sayyaf group, which was holding...
Once the Internet Connection Is Always on, Life Will Never Be the Same
Several years ago, I moved back to Windsor, Nova Scotia, so my children could spend time growing up with aunts, uncles, and grandmothers. But I also wanted to continue to working for the Monitor. This would prove difficult, I knew, but not impossible,...
One Chinese Lawyer's Crusade ; in China, Which Widely Metes out the Death Penalty, 12 Death-Row Inmates Have Won Reprieves in Appeals Launched by Li Yunlong
Xia Lianggui, a farmer's son from the southeastern province of Jiangxi, raped his girlfriend. When she demanded they marry, he strangled her. Although he was a minor, Chinese courts sentenced the youth to death. But then defense attorney Li Yunlong took...
On July 4, Watchful Revelry ; Authorities Expect Americans to Gather Undaunted despite Historically High Security
Amid a slew of vague warnings about possible terror attacks, the nation is readying for its first Fourth of July since 9/11. Patriotism is swirling in the air. So are F-16 fighter jets: Combat air patrols over key cities have been revived for the holiday....
Paths to Patriotism: A College Student
Alexa Greist is certain of this: America is her home. Over the years, after many trips around the world - to Europe, Latin America, Australia - she knows that America is not just where she lives. She belongs here. "I would never live in another country,"...
Paths to Patriotism: A Country Boy
A town like this is supposed to have people like Ellis Wiltshire.With its cornfields crackling in the 100-degree heat, its trim brick post office and library, and its roadside fuel stop that implores drivers, with a wink, to "Eat here, Get gas," this...
Paths to Patriotism: A Marine Recruit
Dontrell Lendsey didn't seem destined for the Marine Corps. He planned to go to college and maybe play Division I basketball. His adoptive mother is a Jehovah's Witness who believes God frowns on belonging to any kind of militia. Mostly, the 19-year-old...
Paths to Patriotism: A Young Immigrant
Of all the reactions of people living in the US on Sept. 11, Luis Barreto's must have been among the most unusual: "The first thought I had was, 'Not again.' " For most young Americans, Sept. 11 was an introduction to terrorism. For Mr. Barreto, it was...
Paths to Patriotism ; since Sept. 11, Many Young Americans Have Wrestled with an Odd New Feeling
Bronwyn Burnett doesn't fit the usual image of an American patriot. Ask the student of fine arts if she'd be willing to serve in the armed forces, and she politely declines, explaining, "I would really not be able to be myself if I were in any kind of...
Patriotism Blooms in a Fresh, Fragrant Way
Since Sept. 11, Americans have plastered their windows, bumpers, and just about anything flat with mass-produced replicas of the American flag. But few have taken their patriotic fervor to the extreme that Bodger Seeds Ltd. of Lompoc, Calif., has. The...
Potato Salads Worth Celebrating ; Get Creative with the Summertime Classic, and Your Dish Will Be the Talk of the Holiday Potluck
It's a familiar July 3 scenario: The hours are slipping away, and you still have to help decorate the historical society float, get streamers for your daughter's bike, wash your son's Cub Scout uniform, and make a dish to bring to the neighborhood potluck....
Seeking More Seekers ; Spurred by Enrollment Drops, Theological Schools Broaden Their Educational Missions
Seminary studies once meant submersion in the finer points of Christian theology. Today, they can translate into submersion of a different kind - in the frigid waters of the Maine coast, for example. Bangor Theological Seminary is offering a week of...
Snack Foods Tap into Americans' Hunger for Patriotism ; for July 4, Retailers Are Capitalizing on Nationalism with Star- Spangled Nibbles
For some Americans, being patriotic isn't about waving the flag, it's about eating it. In a time of heightened nationalism, it's not difficult to find snacks draped in Old Glory. With the precision of Betsy Ross, foodmakers have put stars and stripes...
United We Stood in 1942
In July 1942, seven months after the stunning attack on Pearl Harbor, the newsstands of America presented an unusual sight. The latest issues of many magazines were a profusion of red, white, and blue. American flags appeared on the covers of almost...
What to Wear in Australia? A Trendy Beanie, of Course ; Central Australian Aborigines Keep Everything from Car Keys to Photos of the Grandkids under Their Beloved Beanies
The sunburnt, red landscape of central Australia is usually celebrated for its unrelenting heat. But at this time of year - winter in the Southern Hemisphere - it's the cold that rules. And for many people that means one thing: beanie season. If you...
You've Got Mail - and a Surprise Traffic Ticket
Most days, the mail at our house is fairly predictable - a blend of bills, unsolicited credit-card applications, charitable appeals, and magazines. But on a recent Friday, an envelope addressed to me threw a little excitement - not to mention puzzlement...