The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from December 9, 2003

A Brave Look into Masai Culture ; Elizabeth Gilbert Spent Four Years Documenting a Vanishing Way of Life
"If a warrior has a broken spear, it means that he must have been very brave...."Elizabeth Gilbert's photos in this remarkable collection prove that she must have gotten no little inspiration from this Masai saying regarding courage.Refreshingly, Gilbert...
A Personal Contact with Her Subjects ; Arbus's Photographs Offer Intimate Glimpses of Others' Lives - and of Her
Venturing into Diane Arbus's "Revelations," one encounters "Self- portrait pregnant, N.Y.C. 1945," an image that shows the artist in the most personal and somewhat vulnerable situation: a nude portrait. The image works as a warning that this book is...
A Way out of Despair ; Bringing a Spiritual Perspective to Daily Life
Have you ever had a day or string of days when life seemed pretty bleak? Maybe it had to do with family or money or relationship problems. Maybe you wondered whether or not you'll ever feel comfortable in your own shoes. Maybe you've longed to escape...
Bush Boldly Going Where We Went Decades Ago
All in all, it hasn't been a good three years for the United States of America. The deficit is up. Manufacturing jobs are disappearing. The country was attacked and is now involved in a complicated war on terror, in which victory will be difficult to...
Bush Signature Won't End Medicare Debate ; President Faces Pressure from Two Sides: Some Say the Drug Plan Is Too Costly, Others That It Isn't Generous Enough
The big Medicare bill signed by President Bush Monday is surely historic - but that doesn't mean wrangling over the subject will end with the stroke of his pen. Medicare is likely to remain a difficult and contentious issue in Washington for years to...
Canada Tries to Rein in Biker Gang ; A National Surge in Hell's Angels Membership Spurs Some Provinces to Respond with Tougher Laws and Oversight
From a distance, it looks much like any other warehouse situated within this industrial patch of Toronto. But its gothic sign and menacing sculpture of a winged skeleton head at the doorway are an emphatic proclamation: The Hell's Angels have arrived.It's...
Elections, Putin Style
Russia now has a pseudodemocracy to go along with its pseudocapitalism.That's the message of Sunday's elections for the Duma, or lower house of parliament. Preliminary results gave the United Russia party an estimated 222 of 450 seats, while allied nationalist...
Exceptions to Miranda Rule: Are They Constitutional? ; the Supreme Court Hears Three Cases This Week That Could Clarify the Scope of Defendant Rights
Anyone who watches police dramas on television (or makes a habit of breaking the law) is likely to have heard law-enforcement officials recite the so-called Miranda warnings."You have the right to remain silent. If you give up this right, anything you...
For Democrats, a Glut of Debates ; Tuesday Night's Event Caps a Series That Lifts Underdogs and Puts Front-Runners at Risk
When the nine Democratic presidential candidates gather at the University of New Hampshire Tuesday night for a televised debate, they can take a deep breath and sigh, "Here we go again."By the count of Steve Murphy, Rep. Dick Gephardt's campaign manager,...
Goodbye, Frat Parties; Hello, USA
Krystal Meixner could have spent the fall semester planning sorority events, or studying in her dorm's commons room. Instead, the junior communications major spent it on the road with 16 fellow students, visiting dozens of cities and discussing such...
Housing Prices Test Teachers ; Homes in Affluent Communities Are Often out of Reach for Teachers
After teaching for eight years in San Jose, Calif., Seena Hawley was ready to pack up her things and move to southern Oregon where the cost of living is more reasonable. The fifth-grade teacher thought she'd never be able to afford a place of her own...
How Legalizing Gay Marriage Undermines Society's Morals
The promotion of gay marriage is not the most devastating aspect of the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court's recent decision. The more destructive impact of the decision for society is the court's insidious denial of morality itself as a rational basis...
Iraqi Force Elicits Hope - and Fear ; Sunnis Clerics Say a Battalion Formed to Fight Insurgents Will Sow Sectarian Violence in Iraq
In two weeks, coalition authorities and senior Iraqi party leaders will begin recruiting Iraqi militiamen to create a new counterinsurgency battalion. The fighters' purpose will be to tackle a wave of Sunni-driven violence that American officials predict...
Iraq's Students Say, 'Welcome Back, Professor'
After a decade of sanctions had left his physics lab a crumbling shell, Raad Mohammed decided it was time to go. In 1999, following a route trodden by thousands of the best and brightest of Iraq's academics, Dr. Mohammed escaped to Jordan without a goodbye...
Letters
Sanctions for Zimbabwe would only harm struggling peopleRegarding Robert I. Rotberg's Dec. 4 Opinion piece, "Commonwealth snub of Mugabe a good start on regime change": I, too, would like to see President Thabo Mbeki of South Africa condemn President...
NATO Far from Relieving US Forces in Afghanistan ; Member States Pledged More Materiel Last Week, but a US Handover Looks Unrealistic
NATO-led peacekeeping troops patrolling Kabul's crowded streets can look forward to some long-awaited infusions of aircraft and personnel from the alliance in coming months.An idea put forth last week by US Secretary of State Colin Powell that NATO should...
One Creek as a Test of Western Land Use ; A Miner Who Owns Claims along Oregon's Rough & Ready Creek Brings a Suit That Could Shift the Balance between Economic Development and Preservation
Flowing through the steep Siskiyou Mountains of southern Oregon, Rough & Ready Creek lives up to its name. It tumbles through rugged, forested canyons of Port Orford cedar and Jeffrey pine. Wildlife is abundant. More than 300 plant species - some found...
Patagonia's Newest Nature Park Courtesy of US Tycoon ; Chile's Parque Pumalin, Created by Esprit's Cofounder, Will Be Declared an Official Nature Sanctuary Tuesday
American travelers have long been drawn to the rugged beauty of Patagonia, at the southernmost tip of South America. Its sweeping vistas are reminiscent of Wyoming, Utah, or Montana.These days, though, some wealthy Americans are making it a permanent...
Poets and Yogis: San Francisco Politics ; Green Party Mayoral Candidate Taps the City's Distinctive Culture
David Taylor makes a clear distinction: working as a volunteer on Matt Gonzalez's campaign for mayor is the first time he has ever been involved in electoral politics. Street politics, however, are a different matter.Leaning back in his chair at Gonzalez...
Poles' 22-Hour Commute Pays off - Illegally - in EU
Every Friday morning, hundreds of people line up in this rural northeastern town to board buses for a 22-hour ride across Europe.Their destination: Belgium, where they will work illegally in wealthy households, on farms, and in construction groups in...
Reporters on the Job
* Praying and Dancing for Interviews: The hardest part of reporting today's story about Poles working illegally in Brussels (page 9) was getting undocumented Poles to talk, says reporter Deborah Steinborn. "In Brussels, many Poles who had promised to...
Seeing the City through the Trees ; David Bayles's Love Affair with Trees Began More Than 20 Years Ago
I'm a tree guy. When I saw the cover of "Urban Forest," I instinctively picked it up: A palm tree glows and grows within the spiral ramp of a parking garage; sharp-edged concrete and curvy fronds share the human landscape.David Bayles has been photographing...
The Quick, Decisive Moment ; Henri Cartier-Bresson's Images of Organized Composition and Tension Defined Photojournalism
The French photographer Henri Cartier-Bresson coined the phrase "the decisive moment" to explain how successful photographs combined content and composition.In his 1952 book by the same name, he described the process as "the simultaneous recognition...
The Wright Way to Fly
On Thursday, Dec. 17, 1903, at 10:35 in the morning, Orville Wright lifted off the sands near Kitty Hawk, N.C., in a heavier- than-air machine. He'd won a coin toss with his older brother Wilbur to be the pilot. The machine bucked like a bronco, but...