The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from June 29, 2001

A Lost Handel Score Is Discovered - or Is It?
A new recording of a previously unidentified work by Georg Friedrich Handel (1685-1759), the composer of "Messiah," "Saul," "Israel in Egypt," and other beloved baroque hits, has the music world in a controversy that is nearly too hot to, well, handle....
A Narrow Reprieve Comes for Microsoft ; the Break-Up of the Software Giant Is Voided, Due to the Judge's Conduct
Yesterday's out-of-the-blue court decision that stalls the breakup of Microsoft Corp. is a clear-cut victory for the software giant - but perhaps only a temporary one. A US court of appeals did not settle Microsoft's future, but ordered that a new...
A Pennsylvania Town Faces Up to Old Race Tensions
A gaggle of black and white kids are walking, sometimes skipping and running together, down the tree-lined sidewalk on Newberry Street toward the baseball diamond at the end. A few blocks up, opposite the corner where a black preacher's daughter ...
A Tale of Two Directors ; Steven Spielberg Completed Stanley Kubrick's 'A.I.,' Revealing Their Two Very Different Visions
Steven Spielberg is back on the job. In films as different as "E.T.: The Extra-Terrestrial" and "Saving Private Ryan," Mr. Spielberg has shown an extraordinary knack for getting under the public's skin - less through the power of his ideas than through...
Behind US Foreign Policy, a Focus on Politics of Power ; the White House Reemphasized Ties with Japan This Week, in Effort to Check China
The swearing-in was an extraordinary show of diplomatic pageantry. In an expansive East Room ceremony that ordinarily would have taken place in the smaller Oval Office, former Senate majority leader Howard Baker this week officially assumed the duties...
'Boyz' Director Revisits the 'Hood in 'Baby Boy'
"He got a Oedipus complex!" exclaims a streetwise character in the middle of "Baby Boy," and that sums up the plot in a sentence. Sophocles should get a screenplay credit for John Singleton's new movie - or maybe Sigmund Freud, who gave modern resonance...
Brazil Drops Ball in Soccer ; on Sunday, the Once-Mighty National Team Faces an Uphill Struggle to Qualify for World Cup Finals
In most countries, organizing a national sport tournament is not a monumental task. But when it comes to soccer, Brazil is not most countries. It may be the spiritual home of the game; the place that gave us Pele and Ronaldo; the only nation to win...
Call It 'Poetically Pragmatic,' Perhaps
A biography describes Anton Chekhov as being both practical and poetic. To me, this seems a desirable balance in life. Being practical is a necessity. The monthly rent must be paid, along with gas and electric bills. (I recall two blackouts at home...
Court Strikes Down Indefinite Jailing of Would-Be Immigrants
Resident immigrants facing deportation from the United States may not be held indefinitely in jail simply because their native country refuses to take them back. In an important decision expanding the rights of would-be immigrants, the US Supreme...
Curbing the Corrupt
Economic globalization has many vices, but one of its virtues lies in its ability to force nations to realize they cannot attract foreign investments without honesty in government. How else to explain all the trials and investigations of former leaders...
Getting Parties to Talk Is Task No. 1 for EU Envoy
A new European Union envoy arrived in Macedonia yesterday to help broker a political solution to the crisis there that is threatening to engulf the country in another Balkan war. Installing himself in the capital, Skopje, for several months, Francois...
Gratitude You Could Really Sink Your Teeth Into
Every summer, usually on the Fourth of July, our little down- east Maine town would have the merchants' picnic. This was an old- time clambake whereby the storekeepers would say thanks to their customers for another year of prosperity. There's no...
Hollywood Hills Are Alive with 'Sound of Music'
Audiences arrive dressed as bright copper kettles, brown paper packages tied up with string, nuns, Nazis with snowflakes on their eyelashes, doorbells, sleigh bells, girls in white dresses with blue satin sashes - virtually anything that is either...
How to Make a Buck from Rainwater
When a summer rainstorm rolls in and water is pouring out of my gutters because the down spouts are clogged, I think of William Levitt. He's the man who took a thousand acres on Long Island and created Levittown, the first major housing development...
It's Shakespeare, but Is It News? ; 'NewsHour' Stimulates Imagination; Turner Classic Feeds Appetite for Courtroom Drama
In a recent segment of the "NewsHour with Jim Lehrer," correspondent Paul Solman took to the streets of Denver to report on schoolchildren acting in scenes from Shakespeare's plays. The yearly event is remarkable because many children participate...
Latest NASA Launch Aims to Take Cosmic Baby Picture ; Craft, Peering at Ancient Radiation, Promises Better Understanding of Big Bang and Beyond
When the infant universe was a mere 300,000 years old, it was a thinning fog of protons and electrons - no stars, no galaxies, not an oxygen or carbon atom to be found anywhere. To enter this domain, astrophysicists say, was to enter a vast expanse...
Move Fast to Help Macedonia
Yugoslavia's former province of Macedonia seems to be on a slippery slope toward a full-scale ethnic war that could involve Balkan neighbors. And it might require the kind of massive intervention by the West, including the United States, that we saw...
Movie Guide
Ratings and comments by David Sterritt and Monitor staff Staff comments reflect the sometimes diverse views of at least three other moviegoers. Information on violence, drugs, sex/nudity, and profanity is compiled by the Monitor panel. STAR RATINGS...
Pixieish Cabaret Veteran Keeps Packing in Her Fans
Cabaret singer Blossom Dearie is more than surviving. She's thriving. "My phone rings constantly, to go to Chicago, San Francisco, London, Paris, even Australia. Right now, I want to stay in New York." In a career that kicked off in the late '50s,...
Rendering the US Superpowerless
However seriously one takes the threat of a rogue missile from the sky, it does not seem as real as some of the rogue terrorist activities on earth. The indictment of 13 Saudis and a Lebanese on June 21 in the bombing of Saudi Arabia's Khobar Towers...
Rumsfeld Faces Uphill Battle to Pass Military Budget ; Congress Has Reacted Skeptically to Parts of His $328 Billion Proposal
The immediate congressional ire at the proposed military budget shows how rocky a road lies ahead for Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld. He can expect to absorb plenty of jolts as he seeks approval for his just-released $328 billion budget for...
Shakespeare & Co. Hies to a New Home
"I feel mixed about leaving," says Tina Packer, the artistic director of Shakespeare & Company. "The Mount is not just a playing space; it has been our home. We've had people married there; babies born there. It's where I've done my principal work."...
States Can't Ban Antismoking Ads ; in Victory for Tobacco, High Court Rules against Ban on Cigarette Billboards near Schools
States are preempted by an existing federal law from passing regulations restricting tobacco advertisements that might appeal to children. In a major setback to anti-tobacco activists trying to protect young people from the influence of tobacco advertising,...
The Armed Gain Upper Hand ; Even as West Stepped Up Pressure for Talks Yesterday, Civilians Lack Optimism for a Speedy Political Solution
Sreten Tomevski, a Macedonian Slav factory worker, says he came to three conclusions this week: First, you can't trust trust NATO or the European Union; you can't trust Macedonian politicians; and finally, there can be no peace with the ethnic-Albanian...
The Lasting Pleasure of Curbside Treasure
At the moment, it's spring-cleaning in my small Maine town.The streets are lined with all manner of refuse from the recesses of basements, garages, and attics - a temporary eyesore for some, but for me a prod to a fond remembrance. As a child in...
Turf Tourney Trips Grand Slam Hopes
Gustavo Kuerten, the French Open champion and No. 1 men's player in the world, won't be playing on the grass this week. Neither will Alex Corretja, the French Open runner-up. Pete Sampras, the favorite, doesn't seem to be able to win anywhere else,...
US Losing Patience with Israeli Hard Line
During an intense few days of Middle East diplomacy, the US has turned up the pressure on Israel to strengthen a tenuous cease- fire with the Palestinians. The US has also leaned on the Palestinians, but events this week in Washington and the Middle...