The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from February 22, 2001

A Brief Meditation on the Enlightened One
Karen Armstrong is not one to shy away from what some might consider an impossible task. She is, after all, the author of "The History of God," among a dozen other books. Now the respected British scholar has chosen to write a biography of a major...
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Americans Guardedly Optimistic about Bush
George W. Bush is winning solid - but only tentative - approval from a broad cross section of Americans for his performance during the early weeks of his presidency. A new, nationwide poll has found that by a margin of better than 2 to 1, Americans...
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An Espionage Tale Unfolds ; the Case against an Alleged FBI Mole Shows Loyalty May Be Harder to Come by Today
Signals for the dead drops were made with white adhesive tape on a sign post near the wooden foot bridge in suburban Virginia. One vertical mark from "Ramon" meant "I am ready to receive your package." The Russians signaled back with one horizontal...
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A Spy Rerun
Russia may be on the decline in many ways, but it still manages to sustain and fund an effective spy network. That was clear from the arrest this week of Robert Philip Hanssen, a 27-year veteran of the FBI charged with selling US secrets to the Russians...
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Building Halls of Justice ; the Largest Courthouse Construction Project since the New Deal Is Taking Shape
To find Long Island's new federal courthouse, don't go looking for the typical house of justice. There are no columns out front. No dome on top. No grand staircase or marble walls inside. Instead, architect Richard Meier's massive courthouse - visible...
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Can Blacks Keep Gains in a Slowing Economy? ; Record Educational Gains May Help Break Boom-Bust Cycle of the Past 60 Years
In the 1990s, African-Americans finally latched onto the nation's economic boom and have ridden it to new highs. But in downturns, they've been the most vulnerable to layoffs. Does this economic slowdown promise anything different? The pattern of...
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Cities on a Hill, Churches on the Move
The prolific Puritan minister Cotton Mather had no doubt what brought the faithful to America: "God of heaven served as it were a summons upon the spirits of his people in the English nation; stirring up the spirits of thousands which never saw the...
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For Weary US Air Travelers, Some Canadian Lessons ; Cheaper and More High-Tech, the US Could Take Cues from Canada's Privatized System, a New Report Says
Following one of the worst years on record for American flight delays, US officials are struggling to fix what are widely seen as the problems: an outdated air-traffic control system, and a shortage of runways. The answer may be right next door in...
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Justice on Trial in Yugoslavia ; March 31 Deadline Looms for Belgrade to Begin Cooperating with Hague War- Crimes Tribunal
When a popular uprising toppled former Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic last October, nobody was happier than the chief prosecutor at the international war-crimes tribunal, Carla del Ponte. The new reformist rulers in Belgrade - anxious, she...
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Mom Lightens Up ; A Nutrition-Conscious Parent Makes Room for Some Airy Fun
I had a Fluffernutter epiphany at the grocery store not long ago.To be truthful, it didn't come in a flash. It was more a wearing down of "common sense" and misperceptions. I was, until just recently, one of those mothers who would never, never feed...
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My School Can Use $1,500
As head of a private, urban middle school I founded on a shoestring 17 years ago, I've watched the recent education reform debate from my place at the front lines with more than the usual bemusement. In particular, I'm struck by the steady parade...
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Religious Landscape Redrawn by Drug Case
Anyone interested in religious freedom is bound to find this book fascinating but disturbing. Fascinating because it tracks a landmark Supreme Court case that resulted in the diminution of religious rights in America; disturbing because the court's...
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Russia's Complexity
Today's Russia doesn't present a pretty picture. It's a scene of decline on many fronts - the economy, healthcare, defense, among them. As the lead article in today's Ideas section (see page 15) makes clear, the big demographic picture portends disaster...
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Setback for Rights of Disabled ; High Court Tilts Power to States on Antibias Law
The US Supreme Court has once again sided with the states over Congress in a dispute over governmental power. This time the court, in a 5-to-4 ruling, found that states, in their role as employers of millions of citizens, cannot be sued by workers...
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The Dark Side of the Christian Church
In its ultimate goals, the perverse ideology of Adolf Hitler and the Nazis was not only anti-Jewish, but anti-Christian. Loving one's neighbor and turning the other cheek were not the Nazi way. Hitler hoped eventually to eliminate all institutions,...
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The Double-Edged Sword of Nigeria's Sharia ; Islamic Law Cuts Crime, but Critics Say It Violates Human Rights
Bands of vigilantes in frayed red uniforms, armed with homemade machetes, whips, and clubs, roam this poor and parched state on the edge of the Sahara, detaining anyone suspected of misconduct. The list of possible offenses is long, and justice is...
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The Heart Has Its Reasons
In a culture that has surrendered the definition of heart to margarine manufacturers, Gail Godwin's book is a welcome recasting of a central concept. You could say she looks at the heart of the matter and exclaims, "I Can't Believe It's Not Better."...
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The Incredible Shrinking Russia ; It Is Dawning on the World That among the Tremendous Changes in Russia since the Disintegration of the Soviet Union - Population Decline Is Perhaps the Greatest
In the mid-1960s, William Odom was a young American officer assigned to keep tabs on Soviet troops in Communist East Germany. As he quickly discovered, the Russian Army looked healthy and tough. "I saw thousands and thousands of soldiers," he recalls....
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The Last Choice on Earth - Cremation or Burial?
The dispersal of remains - while not the most popular subject - is, in the end, relevant to everyone. In "Purified by Fire," Stephen Prothero documents one particular trend in America: A growing number of people are choosing cremation over the traditional...
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Time to Engage Central and South America, Too
Most Latin Americans were pleased that President Bush made his first foreign trip to Mexico, seeing it as the necessary forerunner of the enhanced US attention to the entire region that Mr. Bush has pledged. Bush knows the United States comes out...
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Tiny Vermont Town Baffled by Accused Teens
They're not outcasts. They're not potheads or drunks. They're not from broken homes. They aren't obsessed with guns. Talk to almost anyone in this rural hamlet folded among the forests of the Vermont highlands, and they'll tell you the two boys arrested...
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US Grapples with How to Help Curtail Religious Persecution Abroad
President Bush boldly injected religion into his domestic agenda with a new office to fund faith-based social programming. Will he be as bold on the foreign-policy front? For two years now, in response to Americans' growing concerns about religious...
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Women of the Bible Emerge from the Background
This hefty tome, the size of which belies the relative paucity of female characters in the Bible, will sell, if for no other reason than curiosity. Who are these women who slipped through the centuries-old phalanx of mostly male writers and editors?...
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