The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from May 31, 2001

Africa's Lessons Slowly Sink in ; an American Photographer Visits Togo to Build a Community Center - and Discovers Community Instead
Everytime I travel, which is often, unforeseen knowledge and adventures await me. I'm often reminded of my first trip overseas, to West Africa, and the life lessons I encountered there. I went with a group of college friends to Bombuaka, Togo, in...
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A Household of 95 Kinfolk - and Four Bathrooms
Meet the Samanta family, all 95 of them, living under one roof. Granted, it's a big roof, with a four-story building underneath - and one bathroom per floor. But even Indian experts say the Samanta family is unusual. In fact, they may be the largest...
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A Job for Our Planetary Protection Officer ; NASA Must Develop a Facility to Contain Samples from Mars, in Case Alien Life Exists
John Rummel faces a daunting job. He must build a multi-million- dollar lab no one knows how to design, to isolate organisms no one knows will survive, if they arrive on samples from a planet that no one is certain harbors life. Isn't this overkill...
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A Monstrous Problem for Scientists ; Dinosaur Bones Didn't Mesh with the Prevailing Wisdom about the Evolution of Species - or the Earth
In 1822, the year Gideon Mantell published his first book about dinosaurs, the earth was 4,176 years old and every creature, great and small, had been specially created. Talk about career trouble. Archbishop James Usher had calculated the age of...
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A New American Piety ; Islamic Mosques Expand Their Community Role for the Growing Muslim Faithful in the US
Some worshippers arrive at the mosque very early, sliding their shoes into mailbox-like slots in the hallway, completing the ablutions that precede prayer, and then settling down on the rug in the large prayer hall. Several open their Koran to read...
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As Utility Bills Rise, So Do Shutoffs ; the Government and Utilities Themselves Are Scrambling to Put More Aid on the Table for Low-Income Families
Austin Energy, a Texas utility, told Christine and Thomas Alewine that if they didn't come up with $1,619 in overdue charges within a week, it would shut off their water and electricity. They didn't have the money. Mrs. Alewine says she was "already...
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Better Dead Than Read ; A Romance in Communist China, Stained with Old Stereotypes
Let's face it, the media is great at creating and perpetuating stereotypes. Take Asians: inscrutable and mysterious, sly and calculating, from the shuffling house boy to the prostitute with the heart of gold, from Ming the Merciless to Miss Saigon....
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Brazilians Hit the Dimmer Switch ; Shortfalls of Rain and Investment Threaten to Pull Plug on Brazilian and Other Regional Economies
Monica Timm walks along the aisle of the Ipanema department store looking for candles. She's already bought flashlights and is preparing to live without a freezer, a computer, and a television. Like many of her fellow citizens facing energy cuts and...
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Business & Finance
Lucent Technologies will attempt to "go it alone" for the time being after the failure of megamerger negotiations with French telecommunications rival Alcatel, sources close to the talks said. The deal, estimated to be worth as much as $32 billion,...
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Etc
OH, YOU KNOW WHO I MEAN There are memorable introductions, and then there's the one Javier Solana was treated to at this week's NATO conference in Hungary. His official title is high representative for common, foreign, and security policy for the...
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For Pakistan's Women, Election Quotas Are a Start ; Today's Local Elections Are the Third Test at the Polls of the Military Regime's Attempts at Political Reform
Pakistan's military regime has no shortage of critics. But as 20 districts prepare for local elections today, the quota system that reserves one-third of seats for women is earning positive marks from some feminists. "These elections are addressing...
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God Is Not a Republican or a Democrat ... ; Bringing a Spiritual Perspective to Daily Life
Or a political independent, for that matter. That might be worth remembering in the light of the recent stir about United States Senator James Jeffords's decision to leave the Republican Party and become an Independent. The switch is expected to have...
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Guilty Verdicts Put Bin Laden on Notice ; Convictions Set the Scene for Trials of Five Other Defendants Now in Custody
With the conviction this week of four of Osama bin Laden's followers for bombing two US embassies in Africa, American prosecutors put the international terrorist on notice: The arm of American law is long and still reaching for him. Mr. bin Laden...
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How Pre-Life Chemicals May Have Become Biologically Significant
Chemists studying the rise of life on earth have penetrated a little deeper into its mystery. Research reported earlier this month shows how a common mineral could have sorted some of life's precursor chemicals into biologically significant groups....
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How Schools Circumvent Ban on Decalogue ; in Kentucky, Ten Commandments Find a Place among Students; One School Even Has a Chapel
Most people thought the issue was decided: The ACLU had forced three Kentucky counties to take down copies of the Ten Commandments that had been posted in schools, post offices, and other public places. But they would have underestimated the resolve...
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Is Anyone Really in There? ; A Cerebral Novel about Consciousness Explores Faith and Fiction
Can you imagine a novelist thinking of characters in a book whose thoughts are being considered by a critic who's thinking of a review for newspaper readers to think about? David Lodge can. His new novel about the nature of consciousness spins on such...
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Looking like the Asian Enemy
When I walked into a matinee showing of Disney's latest blockbuster, "Pearl Harbor," last weekend, I sat down quietly and asked my non-Asian husband to look around to gauge the ethnic makeup of the audience. Final count: about 10 percent of the viewers...
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Monitor Journalist Honored
The American Geophysical Union has named its award for sustained achievement in science journalism for Robert C. Cowen, who served for 45 years as the Monitor's science correspondent and science editor. Mr. Cowen will become the first recipient of...
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Our Diminishing Water
There's a story in Texas about the rancher who complained when a well driller found oil instead of the water he had been sent to look for. "Cattle can't drink that stuff!" the rancher cried. That story is no longer funny. We are short of both oil...
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Reporters on the Job
ALL IN THE LINE OF DUTY: The Monitor's Scott Baldauf finds that generosity and hospitality to strangers is so omnipresent - and insistent - in South Asia, that his daily caloric intake is rising. Take today's story about India's largest joint family...
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Rescued from Second Place in History ; President John Adams Wins Overdue Accolades in David McCullough's Searching Biography
There are shelves of books devoted to the Founding Fathers. Washington, Jefferson, Frank-lin, and Hamilton have all had numerous biographers. However, few writers have seriously considered John Adams, and consequently, he is much less well known than...
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Resolved: Where Maine Begins and N.H. Ends ; the Supreme Court Settles a Dispute Going Back to Colonial Times over the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard
If it is true that sometimes good fences make good neighbors, then the US Supreme Court has just helped bring an extra measure of civility to New England by settling a long-standing border dispute between New Hampshire and Maine. In a unanimous ruling,...
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The Hay Days of My Youth
If I could, I would give every child a few early years within easy reach of a haystack. Today, long past childhood and far from the ranch where I was born, I look out on a modern barn. Its 20- foot pole legs support a metal roof that shelters tons...
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The Little Sparrow That Could - Only Carry One Person ; Tiny Electric Three-Wheeler Is Expensive, but in Hot Demand
Look at a Sparrow, and you know it's different. Even the name is the antithesis of a brawny Detroit ideal. But this little three wheeler has a mammoth mission - to change the way America thinks about transportation. In this case, that means thinking...
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Turkey Becomes Way Station for Human Trafficking ; on Tuesday, European Leaders Set Jail Terms for Smugglers at a Minimum of Eight Years
As the Lale-1 sailed down the Bosporus through Istanbul earlier this month, it looked like any other down-at-heel ship passing through one of the world's busiest waterways. But Turkish coast guards, who were suspicious, stopped the freighter and...
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Two-Dimensional Characters ; to Follow the Circles in This Storyline, Dig out Your Geometry Textbook
One of the most astonishing and original works of utopian fiction was written in the 1880s by Edwin A. Abbott. (The A. improbably enough stands for "Abbott.") He was a Victorian headmaster and author of a number of volumes that have fallen into obscurity....
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USA
Many California residents were echoing the disappointment of Gov. Gray Davis (D) that President Bush's visit resulted in no relief from the state's energy crisis. As expected, Bush (below, l., with Davis) rebuffed the governor's request that federal...
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When Schools Pay Kids for Test Scores
Florida eighth-grader Kristen Dempsey found that acing an achievement test pays off - literally. A week ago the dark-haired Brooksville youth received a $30 check for scoring above average on the Florida Comprehensive Assessment test. The check wasn't...
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World
Undeterred by thousands of protesters outside, members of Indonesia's parliament scheduled a vote on whether to convene a special session to impeach President Abdurrahman Wahid. The move had the support of both of the nation's major political parties....
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