The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from February 26, 2002

A 'Little Paris' by the Golden Gate
Sometimes I get a craving for Paris that is almost physical: a yearning to smell fresh croissants, to eat a croque-monsieur, to walk down quaint streets surrounded by the lyrical sounds of the French language. When finances or weather prevent my boarding...
A New Terror-War Front: The Caucasus ; Russia and Georgia May Attack Al Qaeda in a Mountain Hideaway
The next flash point in the global war on terrorism could be the Pankisi Gorge, a lawless area in Georgia that abuts rebel Chechnya. In this remote pass, US and Russian officials say Al Qaeda fighters from Afghanistan - possibly even Osama bin Laden...
Arafat and Sharon under Siege
Predictably, few if anyone, either in Israel or among the Palestinians, were satisfied with the slight easing of restrictions on Palestinian Authority President Yasser Arafat which Prime Minister Ariel Sharon's security cabinet decreed on Feb. 24. Mr....
A Scottish Seascape - Done in Oils ; Painting the Places We Visit Is a Whole New Way of Seeing Them - and of Getting to Know Fellow Travelers
I arrived in Scotland with plenty of burnt umber, a couple of No. 4 sable brushes, and an art career that was barely eight weeks old. My wife, Storey, and I had booked a week of painting instruction in the face of my complete lack of artistic ability....
A Second (and Third) Look at AP Tests
The popularity of advanced-placement (AP) courses has soared among high-schoolers in recent years, as students seek to beef up their transcripts and earn college credits before they even set foot on a university campus. But a new report suggests that...
A Tax Cut or Rent? for Unemployed It's a No-Brainer
Alan Singletary isn't quite sure how he'll pay next month's rent - a bewildering predicament for a middle-aged wage earner used to middle-class security. An early victim of the recession, the former assistant manager at a Philadelphia Cinnabon was laid...
A Tropical Weekend Wave of Sun and Sand ; with Bahamian Hospitality in Full Swing, Winter Seemed a Distant Memory
Icicles hung from my car's fender as I drove to the airport one Saturday morning, and the runway had to be de-iced before my plane could land the following Monday evening. But between flights, the only ice I encountered was in the tall glass of lemonade...
Axis of the Atlantic
President Bush's trip to Asia last week was designed to patch up a few ripped relationships. Now he needs to look across the Atlantic, where Europe's post-Sept. 11 solidarity with the US is fraying fast. The threat of terrorism is proving not to have...
Czechs Try to Cap Plastic Explosives Sales ; as Easy to Slip through Airport Security as Nylons, Semtex Has Been Terrorists' Top Choice
Stanislav Brebera spent much of his life developing Semtex, the best plastic explosive in the world. It feels like Play Dough, has no smell, and was designed in 1966 to clear land-mines and improve industrial safety. It is also undetectable by dogs and...
'Dialogue' Brings Hope for Peace in Congo ; Congo's Warring Parties Began Peace Talks Yesterday in Sun City, South Africa
Factions involved in the Democratic Republic of Congo's three- year-long civil war are finally sitting down at the negotiation table, raising hopes that an end to the deadly conflict, which has claimed an estimated 2.5 million lives, may be in sight....
Digging into the Lives of Slaves
In a run-down house in Brooklyn, N.Y., archaeologists recently made an important discovery: a bunch of dried-up corncobs that had lain undisturbed beneath some floorboards for two centuries. The corncobs are the latest clues to how African-American slaves...
Expensive Weapons Won't Ensure Security
Normally sensible and deficit-leery members of Congress are caving in to a huge military spending spike with a speed that leaves the citizen breathless. They are reading both the record and the public wrong. The war on terrorism demonstrates that our...
Foreign Aid Recast as Tool to Stymie Terrorism ; Looking to Fight Root Causes of Attacks, Some Call for Doubling of International Aid
It used to be easy for US government officials to respond to pressure for any increase in foreign aid: Republicans or Democrats, they just said no. Foreign aid was widely considered wasteful, a way for corrupt foreign officials to line pockets, tax dollars...
French Campaign Takes on Crime ; Presidential Hopefuls Vow to Clamp Down on Young Criminals as Elections Approach
Ask a French person what the city of Strasbourg is famous for, and they probably won't mention its medieval cathedral. These days, they will likely say it's the town where the most cars are burned every night by disaffected youths. And although Strasbourg...
In a Small Ohio Town, a Fight over the Right to Knock on Doors
If you want to solicit door to door in Stratton, Ohio, you have to get a permit. The rule is as simple as that, say village officials. Permits are easily obtained from the mayor's office. They cost nothing. No one has ever been turned down. But that's...
In Auvers, Searching for Life in a Haystack ; Landmarks of Art and a Life Fill the Town Where Van Gogh Spent His Last Years
Not far from Paris lies Auvers-sur-Oise, a small town in the Ile- de-France. Here the Oise flows through a quiet landscape, joining the Seine farther downstream. There is the village church, the main square with its Bar Tabac, and, opposite, the town...
Mali's Muslims Steer Back to Spiritual Roots ; Leaders Say a Decade of Western Aid Has Brought with It Materialistic Western Values
Mali has long won the praise of the international community as an African model of multiparty democracy and free-market reform. But a decade after democracy was established, the tide of hardline Islam is on the rise in this peaceful country of 11 million....
Mayors, States Push School Boards Aside ; San Francisco and New York City Schools Are Only the Latest Targets
From San Francisco to New York City, mayors and state legislatures are contesting local school boards for control over classrooms. It's a flat-out challenge to one of the deepest traditions in American public education: schools being run by boards that...
Pakistan Investigation May Fuel Wider Fight ; Pearl Kidnapping Suspects to Be Held for 14 More Days, as Investigation Widens
An antiterrorism courtroom in the port city of Karachi may hold the key to a struggle unfolding deep within the heart of Pakistan. Here, a British-born radical and two suspected accomplices accused of kidnapping US journalist Daniel Pearl had their detention...
Scholars Get Religion ; More Academics Are Starting to See the 'Religion Factor' as Key to Understanding Forces in Economics, Politics, and Society
When it comes to academic scholarship, blue sky and dollars are often the only limits on research. But Luis Lugo discovered another obstacle early in his scholarly career. All it took was for the doctoral candidate in political science to suggest a project...
States Tap New Sources to Root out Tax Dodgers ; Using Powerful Computers, They Cross-Check Records to Find Irregularities, Reaping Millions
ST. LOUIS - Faced with looming budget deficits, a growing number of states are mining for tax cheats. Armed with the equivalent of electronic picks and shovels, they are using a sophisticated new computer techniques to root out delinquent taxpayers....
Students from Here, There, and Everywhere ; in Tokyo, International Schools Follow an English-Language Curriculum but Stay Grounded in Local Culture
A first visit to Tokyo's American School in Japan (ASIJ) includes one jarring moment of cultural disconnect. Walking there from the train station, you turn left at the fruit and vegetable stand, pass through a lane crowded with tiny houses identified...
The Games Were Great. Now about That $1.9 Billion ... ; Salt Lake Set to Break Even, but Economics Are Daunting
The conclusion of the 2002 Winter Games will leave the American Olympic movement with two legacies: 34 medals and a $1.9 billion tab. Many of the medals and memories have been linked to the emotion of having the Olympics on home soil. But with a price...
The Pendulum of Redemption ; Canada Delivered from Decades of Drought by Hockey Gold
You can gather the whole of Canada today from coast to coast - citizens, hockey worshippers, polar bears, and all, and raise a question: Doesn't everyone - a people as well as mountaineers - have a Mt. Everest to climb in life? If the answer is yes,...
Wanted: More Women as Peace Brokers
Ambassador Swanee Hunt wants to turn on its head the notion that men wage war and make peace, while women stand by as hapless victims, contributing nothing to the peace process. Sustaining such stereotypes, she says, are history books and the media -...