The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from July 15, 1997

A Costly Tax Package That Benefits the Rich Two Problems: The Tax Bills Are Not Modest in the Long Term, and the Cuts Are Not Primarily for the Middle Class Series: Part 2 of 2
The tax bills that the House and Senate approved at the end of last month are being sold as a modest tax cut of $85 billion over five years that primarily benefits the middle class. Such claims amount to deceptive advertising on two counts.First, the...
A Desert Encounter: Serpent and Writer in a Hotly Contested Corner of the Sahara, Not All of the Dangers Stem from War
The sun set as it always does over the desert: bathing the earth in its molten glow, then leaving a band of orange and ruby red above the western horizon, then giving way completely to the bright point of Venus.We continue driving for several hours in...
And Now for the Good News about Higher Education
NBC anchor Tom Brokaw recently opened a segment entitled "The Class of 2001" by asking, "The tuition has been paid, the hard work is done, you've got your college degree. So why can't you find a job?"NBC reporter Fred Francis went on to report that 6...
Beach Bums: Test the Waters before Plunging in Study Examines Causes of Beach Pollution and Where and How Often It's Monitored
"Let's go to the beach!" To many Americans, the call is familiar this time of year. But before you grab your swimsuit and sun glasses, you may want to consider how clean your beach is.A recent study on beaches says there could be more to seawater than...
Beyond Newsletters: Futuristic Printers Can Build Jet Engines A Manufacturing Breakthrough Allows 3-D Objects to Be Created Using Technology Similar to an Ink-Jet Printer
Almonst anyone can create greeting cards and art with a computer and an ink-jet printer. But some added technology and imagination can take printing far beyond ink and paper.New printers based on ink-jet technology are revolutionizing manufacturing by...
China's Controversial Gifts: For What? Behind This Week's Senate Hearings Are Questions about Chinese Intentions
The Senate hearings resuming today concerning alleged Chinese influence peddling are mainly about money and American politics. But the investigation also raises two important questions: What does China want, and is it likely to get it?Among its top priorities,...
Clinton Dusts off His 'Spin Machine' Current Campaign-Finance Hearings Take the Art of 'Crafted Talk' to a New Level
Each day of the congressional hearings into campaign-finance irregularities, the White House dispatches four men down Pennsylvania Avenue to Senate chambers near the proceedings. In borrowed offices of fellow Democrats, the four watch the testimony...
Do Whistleblowers Threaten Security When Telling Congress of Spies' Lies? Showdown Comes This Week on a Senate Proposal to Shield Whistleblowers
A Battle is brewing between the White House and Congress that could determine how much power the nation's secret spy agencies can wield in the future and how much say the public should have in the oversight of their operations.At the heart of the dispute...
Florida Net Ban Leaves Some Fishers Adrift Coastal States Eye Fight between Old-Salt Fishermen and Well-Heeled Sportfishers over Gill-Netting Practices
A member of the Florida Marine Patrol sits patiently in his boat, scanning the inky horizon with night-vision goggles as a helicopter whirrs overhead.The patrol is looking for contraband on Florida's inshore waters. But the search is not for drug runners,...
Germany: Hot Spot for Contemporary Art Two Exhibitions Put Art on City-Wide Scales, Transforming Public Spaces
This summer, Germany hosts two of the world's largest exhibitions of contemporary art. Kassel offers its 10th "documenta," held every four or five years in this city in northern Hesse. About 90 miles northwest, Munster, in North-Rhine Westphalia, presents...
Kenya's Churches Enter Fray against President Prominent Anglican Says Moi Regime Has Been 'Weighed and Found Wanting
Students who protested again yesterday against the repressive regime of President Daniel arap Moi in Kenya picked up an important ally over the weekend: Kenya's churches.Churchgoers here are not usually described as radicals or agitators, yet from the...
Letters
Air Travel Subject to User Fees, Not TaxesIn "Taxes May Mean Less-Frequent Fliers" (July 11) the author does his readers a disservice by making reference to the proposed "taxes" on airline tickets. Even though many of our political leaders also have...
Peace in Algeria May Get Boost from New Oil Deals with US
The key to peace in Algeria may be largely untapped, and lying beneath the scalding sands of the Sahara Desert.This is Algeria's Wild West oil town: Black smoke from fiery gas burn-offs clouds the sky, pipelines crisscross the oil-stained sand between...
Play the Piano without Waking the Neighbors
So Junior is learning to play an instrument. Just yesterday digging in the sandbox, and now he is playing Bach!Or trying to. Deep down you know his trumpet solo more closely resembles cacophony than cantata. Wouldn't it be nice if the little tyke could,...
Prison Threat: Gangs Grab More Power
Gang's are so powerful at Stateville maximum-security prison in Joliet, Ill., that they control entire cell blocks, run a profitable drug trade, corrupt guards, and gain unsupervised interviews with wardens, experts and officials say.The growing influx...
Rolling around on Mars Meet the Man Who Tells the Mars Rover Where to Roam
Brian Cooper drives the ultimate in radio-controlled cars. From the air-conditioned comfort of his cubicle at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., Mr. Cooper controls Sojourner, the six-wheeled rover inching its way across the surface of...
Struggle in the Sahara US-Led Talks Could Ease Tension between Morocco and the Polisario. but the Guerrillas Stand Ready
The aging hardware of Western Sahara guerrillas is kept well-greased and protected from the unrelenting desert sun by woven grass and faded canvas - in case the cease-fire with Morocco breaks down.But as peace talks resume in Lisbon, Portugal, next week,...
Summer Reading A Spiritual Look at Issues of Interest to Young People
Maybe you've noticed those lists of books that come out each summer, recommending what people should read when they're on vacation or hanging out at home with free time.How would you react to a list that included stories like the following? "A heartwarming...
Swiss Banks Let World Peek into Vaults for Victims' Money on July 23 the Names on Accounts of Nazi Holocaust Victims Will Be Made Public
Switzerland's banks, famous for their secrecy, are letting the world look at their ledgers, at least in part.For the first time ever, on July 23 banks will publicize worldwide the names on Holocaust-era bank accounts. The move is meant to speed the return...
The Best and Worst America Has to Offer
In just the last few weeks we have seen America at its best - and its worst. The positive stories focused on the passing of legends in the entertainment and communication business - Jimmy Stewart and Charles Kuralt.Here were two men who made us feel...
The CIA's Raison D'etre the New Director Should Focus on Better, Rather Than Bigger, Ideas
George Tenet, who was confirmed last Thursday as director of central intelligence, has been on the receiving end of plenty of free advice as he takes the reins of America's chief spy agency. Here's some he likely hasn't heard but should heed: Beware...
The News in Brief
The USThe Justice Department distanced itself from Sen. Fred Thompson's statement that China plotted to raise its influence in US politics, and the Governmental Affairs Committee chairman acknowledged it may be impossible to prove the charge. Executives...
TV Cameras on Trial
Television cameras are allowed in courtrooms in 47 of the 50 states. But New York may make that 46.That state's legislature is considering whether a law permitting TV cameras inside a courtroom should be altered or thrown out altogether. Legislators...
Two Jobs, Dueling Incomes WORKPLACE
Ellen and Alex live pretty well. They take vacations when they want, eat out regularly, and they just bought their first house in an affluent Boston suburb.And Ellen gets most of the credit for making a comfortable lifestyle affordable.She earns twice...
US Foreign Policy and Spaghetti Westerns: Finding the Right Mix
Promised Land, Crusader State: The American Encounter with the World Since 1776By Walter A. McDougallHoughton Mifflin Co. 286 pp., $26 The history of US foreign policy, Walter McDougall remarks tongue in cheek, is a lot like Sergio Leone's spaghetti...
What Boulders on Mars Are Telling NASA about Their Life Stories IF ROCKS COULD TALK
Here on Earth, all those Martian rocks with their Hanna-Barbera names may look rather ordinary. Hardly worth a 309-million-mile flight.But to geologists, rocks hold clues for how the Red Planet was formed and what has happened to it in the last million...
Writings of Great Scientists Show Drama and Danger of Discovery Anthology Presents Works of Literary and Scientific Importance
Galileo's Commandment: An Anthology of Great Science WritingEd. by Edmund Blair BollesW.H. Freeman 485 pp., $26.95 Most textbooks no longer describe scientific progress as a ladder of inquiry extending from the ancients to the present. Yet an...