The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from January 22, 1999

All the President's Men (and One Woman) Clinton's Legal Team, Arguing before the Senate, Displaysdifferent Voices and Styles
Linda Ramer emerged from the Senate visitors' gallery with a new point of view this week. And it was White House counsel Charles Ruff who gave it to her.Up to now, this Californian had been leaning toward conviction for the president. But Mr. Ruff offered...
All Tied Up
Have yet to put on a necktie and not feel the tightening of the hangman's noose. After all, growing up in Manhattan, I couldn't even play in the coal bin without proper attire.Kindergarten marked the transition from sailor suit to business suit - made...
A Master of 'Austere' Films
As there room for spiritual ideas at the movies?Look at most of today's popular films, and the answer might appear to be a regretful "no." Some pictures nod toward uplifting sentiments or family-values morality, and myth-minded filmmakers like George...
And Now, a Word about Bribery
Why all the gnashing of teeth concerning the graft and corruption that Salt Lake City engaged in to lure the 2002 Winter Olympics to its local venues and nearby mountains?Come on, people, we are shedding crocodile tears and engaging in hyperbolic hysteria...
A Way to Filter out Naughty Words
Most parents would be outraged if a stranger spouted off cuss words and sexual innuendos in the presence of their children.But it happens every day- mostly unchecked and unnoticed - right in their own homes.Television programs like "NYPD Blue," "Party...
Capturing Wild Film Footage
Animals roam the airwaves in vast numbers. What with so many cable stations offering animal documentaries, to say nothing of "shockumentaries" (like Fox's "When Animals Attack"), it can be difficult to choose.A haven for nature lovers is always a National...
Crux of Trial: What Is High Crime? Outcome of Senate Proceeding May Pivot on Meaning of Two Wordsthat Have Been Debated since Days of Madison
When all the lawyering is done in one of the most important trials of the century, the ultimate question for the Senate will be simple: Did President Clinton's alleged conduct rise to the level of impeachable "high crimes and misdemeanors"?Certainly,...
Europe's Bid to Be Arms Giant: Is UK Going Own Way? A Merger Tuesday Created World's Third-Largest Arms Group. Boostfor US- Chasing Europe - or Another Snub?
Europe's weapons companies are taking a bumpy road to creating an integrated industry able to challenge United States world dominance in arms sales.As usual, the United Kingdom is marching out of step with its neighbors, who are angry at what they see...
Fossil Find Gets to Guts of Dinosaur Debate
A 110-million-year-old fossil from the south of Italy is giving scientists the fullest picture yet of why dinosaurs dominated animal life for eons.For millions of years, predators like velociraptor and Tyrannosaurus rex ruled the earth. Now, the Italian...
Greasing Palms, or Just the Japanese Way?
The residents of utah have a reputation for sobriety and straight shooting that makes the Salt Lake City Olympic bribery scandal seem all the more scandalous.But here in Japan, the practice of sweetening a business relationship with lavish entertainment...
Letters
Pro bono legal work - what's fair? Regarding "Should lawyers be required to work for free?" (Jan. 13): What an interesting about-face is being executed by the general public, as reflected in the issue of mandated pro bono (free) legal services being...
Me? Reform Social Security? Bringing a Spiritual Perspective to Daily Life
A recent monitor headline, "A rising din over Social Security," carried this telling subhead: "Fixing the system has become No. 1 issue, but no consensus exists on the best way" (Dec. 3, pg. 1). The funding crunch is, by most estimates, more than 30...
Miss Bragdon Teaches a Blizzard
It does seem to me that, as things roll along, our sources of information know less and less about more and more. Take one of our TV channels. It has a weather man who is "chief meteorologist," and the other evening he said we'd have southeast wind and...
Museum Extension ... ... Spirals into Controversy
The Victoria and Albert Museum is vigorously for it. But Mrs. Ethne Rudd is totally against it."It" is "the spiral."The spiral is a proposed new extension to the V&A, Britain's major 19th-century decorative arts museum. Mrs. Rudd, secretary of the Kensington...
National vs. Personal Interest When Presidents - and the Public - Confuse the Two, Trouble Starts
Last Aug. 17, when President Clinton went on television after his grand jury appearance to confess a "not appropriate" relationship with Monica Lewinsky, I happened to be attending an Aspen seminar with Sen. Diane Feinstein (D) of California. She said...
New Ways of Addressing an Old Urban Problem despite a Strong Economy, Homelessness Continues to Rise in America. but Boomtime Dollars Are Helping Cities Engineer Effective Solutions
Out on America's streets, the living is not as easy as the rollicking stock market and strong economy might indicate.In fact, despite years of work and millions of dollars spent to eradicate it, homelessness in America is still on the rise - a defiant...
Next Up: Righting Cambodia Virtually All Khmer Rouge Have Given Up. Can the World Bring Themto Justice?
"Forgive and forget" doesn't always apply, a surprised Cambodian prime minister learned - not when it comes to the Khmer Rouge, the "Red Cambodian" Communist regime best known for its "killing fields" of the 1970s.While welcoming the surrender of two...
Off-Broadway Gains Ground
If you're looking for meaty drama - or even old-fashioned comedy - it's hard to beat New York City's off-Broadway theater.Long hailed for its avant-garde playwriting and acting, in recent years, off-Broadway has increasingly eclipsed Broadway in the...
Politics Not as Usual in Mexico Candidates for 2000 Plunge in Early as Growing Democracy Defiestradition of One-Party Rule
Every night on Mexican television, the smiling, boyish governor of the Gulf state of Tabasco sings the praises of his four years in office. He wraps up an ad showing schools, roads, and clean environment with the words, "Tabasco: actions, not words."Why...
Putting New Meaning in 'Hard Drive'
Sometimes when technology advances, the result is a step backward for society. The latest illustration of this paradox came at the recent Detroit car show. I heard a TV reporter describing a new on- board computer system that will allow motorists to...
Restoring the Florida Everglades - One River at a Time Cleanup of the St. Lucie River Gets a Boost with Vice President'sannouncement of a $312 Million Pledge
Just north of the St. Lucie Inlet in the Indian River is a wide expanse of knee-deep water where swift tides sweep across a river bottom carpeted with sea grass.It is an unusual and fascinating place created by the workings of wind and tide over hundreds...
Sports 101
Roller Derby is back. Only this time it's called RollerJam. Jerry Seltzer, whose father invented the game with Damon Runyon during the Depression, returns as commissioner of the six-team league, known as the World Skating League. Mr. Seltzer ran the...
State of the Union - Candy or Honesty?
I sat down to watch President Clinton's State of the Union address with a bag of round oat cereal and a roll of flexible wire. I figured I was in for a long sit, and I don't do needlepoint. Stringing cereal on the wire would provide food for the wild...
The Monitor Movie Guide
Reviews in this weekly guide are written by Monitor critic David Sterritt (the first set of '+' marks in each review) unless otherwise noted. Ratings and comments by the Monitor staff panel (the second set of '+' marks in each review) reflect the...
The Tremors under Milosevic's Yugoslavia A Key Region, Montenegro, Makes Reforms That Loosen His Grip Onpower
With its soaring mountain ranges, spectacular opening to the Adriatic Sea, and leisurely pace of life, the tiny Yugoslav republic of Montenegro seems worlds away from the confrontational politics in much of the country.But this land of some 600,000 inhabitants...
Tobacco Battles, Rejoined
With the president's blessing, the US Justice Department is opening its own front in the litigation war against tobacco. Declaring the states had been right to go after cigarette companies for money spent to treat illnesses associated with smoking, Mr....
Today's Story Line:
As the International Olympic Committee bribery scandal unfolds in Salt Lake City, Japan is awakening to reports of gifts given to win the right to host the 1998 Winter Games at Nagano. The bidding committee's accounting books were mysteriously burned....
USA
The White House called on former Sen. Dale Bumpers to help wrap up its final day of defense in the impeachment trail of President Clinton. Bumpers, a gifted public speaker and longtime friend of the president, retired this year after representing Arkansas...
Welfare Reform: Phase 2
The statistics on welfare shrinkage are impressive. In his State of the Union message, President Clinton proclaimed the rolls have been cut by "nearly a half'' over the last six years. That pace has accelerated in the two and a half years since the enactment...
What's on TV
shows worth noting for JAN. 23-29Listings are not necessarily recommended by the Monitor. All times Eastern, check local listings.Saturday 1/23 Right on the Money (PBS, check local listings): A smart new series that helps people solve their money problems....
Which Kids Shows Make the Grade? Network Executives and Child Advocates Weigh in on Children'sprogramming
It's midterm exam time for schoolkids around the country, and if there's any place many of those students would rather be, it's in front of the television.On behalf of the sorely tested children who might try to make the argument that TV is a teaching...
World
US cease-fire monitor william Walker was ordered out of Yugoslavia for publicly accusing Serbs of murdering 45 ethnic Albanians last weekend. But there were hopes of a last-minute compromise that would allow him to stay and forestall punitive air strikes...