The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from May 2, 2000

A New Hospital but Few Patients ; A Nearly Vacant Hospital in Kosovo Epitomizes the Divisions between the Remaining Serbs
Sasa Ivic is an anesthesiologist's assistant at a new hospital that opened five weeks ago in this Serb enclave in central Kosovo. The problem for Mr. Ivic is that there is no anesthesiologist to assist. And without an anesthesiologist, there can be no...
China Debate Intersects Religion and Trade ; US Commission on Religious Freedom Deals Another Setback to Pending Trade Bill
A government-backed group of religious and human rights experts is recommending that Congress not approve permanent normal trade relations with China. In its first annual report, the US Commission on International Religious Freedom said it supported...
DNA Raises New Dilemmas for Fatherhood
Three years after his divorce, Morgan Wise went for a blood test for medical reasons. The results were shocking: It turned out that the three boys he called "son" weren't his. Outraged, and armed with DNA evidence, the Texas railroad engineer went back...
Education for the World
Before we celebrate the dawn of the Internet Age, it's time for this pop-up-window reminder: One of every five adults in the world cannot even write a letter. In the primary schools of some poor nations, students practice writing and math in the dirt...
Education Ministry ; A Community Effort to Erase the 'Achievement Gap' Finds Its Home in Urban Churches
It's a rainy Wednesday night, and the Sunday School classrooms at Congregacin Len de Jud are filled with clusters of teens. Surrounded by colorful posters bearing Spanish and English phrases like "Jesus loves me," students clad in jeans and jewelry whisk...
E-Government Grows, with Glitches ; Washington State Leads the Way in Putting Its Services on the Web. but Is It Leaving Residents Behind?
All Michael Fairley wanted was a show-promoter's license for his Seattle antique business. But to get one from the state, he spent five full hours on the phone one day. Had the form been available online, which it will be soon, his need could have been...
Elian in Perspective
For weeks, it has seemed like there is one and only one child in our country, Elian Gonzalez. And while I think the epic battle over the six-year-old is wrenching, I keep thinking about other children I know. Children in my own community, living in...
From a Local Corner, a Trip around the World
Walk into Club Passim on "Culture for Kids Day," and you might not recognize the rustic folk club known for its good food, warm atmosphere, and roster of excellent folk musicians. On this day, kids are busy in the kitchen of the Cambridge, Mass., cafe,...
Gore and the Press
I had actually thought that Stan Greenberg, an Al Gore adviser, would say that he thought the vice president should open himself more to examination by the media. Mr. Gore had shut down on press conferences and meetings with groups of journalists -...
Grade-Schoolers Say, 'I'll Pencil That In'
Kyle Churchill no longer asks his twin sister to remember their homework assignments. That's because he has a new weapon: a shiny black day planner. "It's great, because if I forget my math homework, I can just look it up in my agenda," he says. But...
Helping Teens' Needs
Today's White House Conference on Teenagers has been criticized as a politically motivated event, taking advantage of the recent anniversary of last year's violence at Columbine High School in Littleton, Colo. Some suspect the conference is largely intended...
How Schools Stop Teen Violence ; Recent Shootings Have Prompted Districts Nationwide to Try New Programs, and a Template for Success Is Emerging
Across the nation, communities are redoubling their efforts to prevent teen violence - much of it in the year since the shootings in Littleton, Colo. While tragedies such as Columbine are what often dominate the headlines, experts say a growing number...
Internet Research: More Than Click and Print
Your article "But I found it on the Internet!" (April 25) was most interesting. I appreciate that you recognized the difficulties we classroom teachers have with the new technology movement. I have been using the Internet myself for approximately 11...
New Faces Join Fray in Kashmir ; an April Suicide Bombing Points to a New Insurgent Group Manned by Local Boys
Ashfaq Ahmed Shah was a good student in the 12th grade, close to his grandmother, and shy. Always a devout Muslim, lately Ahmed had been spending a lot of time in the local mosque. At 11:10 a.m. on April 5, Ahmed's father got a call at work. "asalam...
One Family's Fight to Overturn Immigration Law ; Susie Church Has Lived in America since She Was an Infant, but She May Be Deported. Her Story Has Focused Attention on a Controversial 1996 Law
Susie Church remembers the exact moment her troubled life became frantic. She had gone to dinner with the other inmates, and when she got back to her cell there was a blue paper on her bed. It read: detainer. Asking around, she discovered she was going...
Resourceful Subjects
In each of the following books for children and young adults we find characters who are good at solving problems. Can you name the titles? (Hint: The first was a bestseller and a major motion picture.) 1. Our next attempt at measuring thrust was...
Sites to See
Looking for Web sites with educational value, or where children can play games this summer? We've rounded up a list of 37 sites that we've reviewed in the past two years. Check out a few - and if you go to the Learning page at www.csmonitor.com, we'll...
South Asia Reels from Drought and Famine
Just as India is recovering from the devastating cyclone that ripped through the East last November, wells have recently dried up and crops have withered in the drought afflicting the nation's sun- blistered west and central regions. Today, up to 80...
Thai Elections: No Speeches and Less Tolerance of Fraud ; Yesterday, Election Officials Said More Candidates Could Be Disqualified for Fraud, a Radical Move in Thailand
In a nation that has known 17 military coups in the past 50 years, this most recent upheaval has been a relatively quiet affair.There were no guns, no tanks in the street, no martial music on television and radio. The change this time is being wrought...
'The Kids Are the Stars'
Samuel Acevedo has witnessed two opposite aspects of urban youths' lives: crime and salvation. As a lawyer working with the New York City courts to determine the best interventions for juvenile offenders, he routinely encountered adolescents whose lives...
Today - a Really Special Day ; A Spiritual Look at Issues of Interest to Young People
Is there one day in the year that you think is most special? A day you look forward to all year long? Maybe it's your birthday, or Christmas, or the last day of school. Or maybe even the first day of school. I used to have one day that was so absolutely...
Today's Story Line
The Indian line on the Kashmir conflict is that it's fueled by insurgents crossing over from Pakistan. But a new generation of boy militants is emerging - and they're homegrown. A new, but empty, hospital in Kosovo epitomizes the influence of Slobodan...
USA
The Supreme Court ruled that public-sector employees who agree to take extra time off instead of collecting overtime pay can be forced to use it at their employer's convenience. The 6-to-3 decision, in a case from Houston, is an interpretation of the...
When It Comes to Projects, These Kids Think Big
Tyler West maneuvers his Power Point presentation of a new high school gym with all the ease of a techie for Microsoft. Of course, it's not the first time the high-schooler has shown the presentation. He and his lab partner, Trent Sullivan, worked on...
Where Do French Fries Come from? ; (and Why Do You Suppose It Took 4,000 Years to Figure out How Good They Are?)
By 200 BC, potatoes had been farmed in Peru for at least 2,000 years. But the starchy tuber (a member of the Solanum family, which includes tomatoes and deadly nightshade) didn't come to the attention of the West for another 1,700 years. In 1524, Spanish...
World
In a bid to nudge the latest negotiations onto a friendlier footing, a senior Israeli official said a Palestinian state is already a fact and only its limitations will be defined in a final peace treaty. The talks, at Eilat, a Red Sea resort, got off...