The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from December 28, 2000

Altars for Today ; Bringing a Spiritual Perspective to Daily Life
The first time I went to Europe by myself, I spent a lot of time walking alone through churches, quietly delighting in all the art. My favorite stops were the altars. I loved to think about the lives of the artists who had lent their talents to depict...
A Scorecard of Religious Freedom around the World
Religious Freedom in the World Edited by Paul Marshall Broadman & Holman Publishers 331 pp., $14.99 Since 1978, Freedom House has published an annual assessment of political rights and civil liberties in 191 countries. In 1986, it began to also report...
Bush Faces a Different Fight over Counting ; Census Bureau Today Issues State-by-State Count. Should Its Data Be Adjusted?
Early next year, George W. Bush will make a potentially historic decision about Census 2000. The new president must decide whether to permit the United States Census Bureau for the first time to "statistically adjust" the numbers gathered in the nationwide...
Chicago's Preservation Blues
The image was almost too painful: aging blues singer Jimmie Lee Robinson walking to the middle of Maxwell Street to sing "Maxwell Street Blues" as demolition crews tore down a block of buildings that once framed one of the most vibrant places of cultural...
Chile's Delicate Dance around Pinochet Prosecution ; the Supreme Court Tuesday Ordered Evaluation of the Aging Ex- Leader, before Questioning Can Proceed
Efforts to bring former Chilean dictator Augusto Pinochet to trial for kidnapping and murder at times resemble a tango through a thicket of thorns: determined steps forward; then back; snags, scratches, a whirl of activity. The judges overseeing...
Coal Town's Key to Revival: Lots of Bake Sales
For years, this eastern Kentucky town had seemed little more than a crumbling memorial to Appalachian coal. There had been good days, sure. During World War II, Benham was as rich as the black seams of rock that generations of men and women extracted...
Democrats Plot Their Comeback ; without Control of the White House or Congress, They Must Find a Balance between the 'New' and 'Liberal' Wings
Not since the days when Americans liked Ike and loved Elvis have Democrats been so down and out in Washington. For the first time in 45 years, the party will not control either the House, the Senate, or the Oval Office. It's a scenario that might...
Economic Cushions, Cautions
Last summer, the National Governors Association issued a report describing how states can use research-and-development capabilities to grow their economies. This month, Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan endorsed the idea. Now some states are...
Etc
SO YOU THINK THAT'S FUNNY? Already there have been dog sled racing, gliding, roller hockey, and - at this year's Olympics in Sydney, Australia - trampolining. Next, apparently: ballroom dancing, which won official recognition in 1997. Now comes a...
Firms Try to Alleviate Worker Stresses ; with 'Vengeance' Homicides on the Rise at US Offices, More Firms Take on Role of Psychiatrist
After allegedly killing seven of his co-workers, Michael McDermott was arrested as he sat in the office lobby cradling the three guns he'd used to make his point. The killing spree in Wakefield, Mass., coming so cruelly the day after Christmas, seems...
How to Respect the Free Exercise of Faith
God's Name in Vain: The Wrongs and Rights of Religion in PoliticsBy Stephen Carter Basic Books 248 pp., $26 Stephen Carter fired an important volley in favor of religious freedom in his 1993 landmark book, "The Culture of Disbelief." The prolific ...
In China, an Example of Safety Taking a Back Seat ; Fingerpointing Follows Monday's Deadly Fire, but Are Reforms Next?
The Christmas evening conflagration that killed 309 people in central China's Henan Province has prompted President Jiang Zemin to demand severe punishments for those responsible. But it is not clear whether that will be enough to bring about fire-safety...
Investing in Human Rights
As business interests become ever more global, business itself can play a large role in determining whether basic human decency and justice are respected. In developing countries with weak legal systems that role too often has been overlooked in the...
Macaroni and Cheese? Praise the Lord!
Whitebread Protestants: Food and Religion in American Culture By Daniel Sack St. Martin's Press 262 pp., $24.95 As a lover of all dishes spicy and rich, I now know who to blame for America's yen for macaroni and cheese, turkey on Wonder Bread, oatmeal,...
Readers Write
Ralph Nader is not a sell-out William Klein's Dec. 22 opinion piece, "Ralph Nader for sale," reminds me of those who criticized Mr. Nader when he disclosed assets totalling some $3 million - as though Nader's political platform is somehow contradictory...
Religion: It's Not Just for Sunday Anymore ; Our Quarterly Roundup Finds Authors Looking at the Function of Faith Then and Now
Why religion matters By Huston Smith HarperSanFrancisco 290 pp., $25 Huston Smith is the closest thing religious scholarship has to a rock star. His classic book "The World's Religions" has sold more than 2 million copies. In 1997, he was the focus...
Sweating the Details in Mideast ; Barak and Arafat to Meet Today in Egypt. but Palestinian Refugee Status a Peace Obstacle
Almost everyone seems to agree that Israelis and Palestinians have never been closer to a peace deal. But are they close enough? Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Barak has signaled that he is more or less ready to go along with the outlines of the deal...
Tangled on the Web of Greed and Generosity
THE VIRTUE OF PROSPERITY Finding Values in an Age of Techno- Affluence By Dinesh D'Souza The Free Press 284 pp., $26 It's become commonplace for critics on both the right and the left to bemoan the ways computer technology and the sudden wealth of...
The Greatest Story Ever Told - in One Volume
Christianity:A Global History By David Chidester HarperSanFrancisco 627 pp., $32 Anyone who remembers wading through a college textbook that tried to contain the whole of Western European history can understand the effort required to tell the history...
The Higher Math, to Me, Was Poetry
I think that I shall never see A polynomial lovely as a tree. On parents' night, I sat in my son's algebra classroom, looked at the blackboard, and felt an old, familiar horror. I was back in my own high school algebra class, confronted by scary...
The Monitor's Guide to Religion Bestsellers
The Monitor's quarterly review of bestselling religion books offers a one-stop opportunity to survey the resurgent interest in religion and spirituality. Available on tape HARDCOVER 1. THE MARK, by Tim LaHaye and Jerry Jenkins, Tyndale House, $22.99...
USA
California Gov. Gray Davis (D) met with Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan in Washington Tuesday, seeking advice on how to deal with the crisis that puts the state's two major utilities, which report $8 billion in uncollected energy debts, at...
Vancouver Mulls Safe Drug Sites ; by February, the City May Try European Method of Reducing Overdoses of Heroin and Cocaine
Clean needles. Clean spoons. And a roof over their heads. Vancouver, the city with the highest number of drug overdose fatalities in Canada, may soon have a safe place for local addicts to use their drug of choice. That would make it the first city...
'Whom Do Men Say That I the Son of Man Am?'
The Messiah before Jesus By Israel Knohl University of California Press 145 pp., $22 The University of California Press has just issued a small but mind-bending book, "The Messiah before Jesus," by Israeli scholar Israel Knohl. Three years' research...
Wisdom from a Past War
Although there is danger in carrying historical comparisons too far, a reporter who covered Algeria's war for independence from France from 1954 to '62 finds similarities and lessons for the guerrilla war the Palestinians have now begun against Israel,...
World
The first face-to-face talks in two months were scheduled for today between Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat and Israel's Ehud Barak. The summit, at the Red Sea resort of Sharm el-Sheik in Egypt, presumably will discuss a recent proposal for peace...