The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from April 18, 2001

A Revolt against Dialing While Driving
From the front seat of his Suffolk County police cruiser, Bill Treubig spots the offender, a woman in a late-model Lexus SUV. As she starts to enter the Long Island Expressway, the highway patrolman hits his flashing lights. At first, the woman isn't...
As Welfare Clock Runs out, Lessons from Iowa
Melody Morgan says she wants to work. She wants it for her pride, for the regular paychecks, and for her children, so they can grow up better off than she did. But it hasn't been easy finding a job - not when you're living at a homeless shelter and...
A Year Later, Kids' Privacy Rules Still Debated
This Saturday marks the one-year anniversary of an important ruling about privacy and children's websites. In anticipation of the occasion, the Annenberg Public Policy Center of the University of Pennsylvania decided to take a hard look at whether...
Back on Track ; Communities Reclaim Passenger-Rail Stations and Create New Landmarks
As Amtrak train No. 171 pulls into Westerly, R.I., a most pleasing sight comes into view: a good-as-new station that dates to 1912. This is no time-machine fantasy. The once-derelict brick-and- concrete facility has been restored to its original glory,...
Beyond the Spy-Plane Issue: Keep Engaging China
A few days ago, at a convention of newspaper editors in Washington, I attended a remarkable reunion. It was a reunion of editors who had made the first pilgrimage to China some 25 years ago, after it opened up to the West, and a number of Chinese...
Business & Finance
Reports of heavy layoffs dominated business headlines, with- in some cases - major corporations announcing a second round of cuts only weeks after the first: * Cisco Systems said it will eliminate 8,500 jobs, about 1,000 more than it had predicted...
Cooling Racial Hot Spots
Slaves arrived in America a year before the Pilgrims, and while slavery was eliminated long ago, vestiges of racism cling to American society like extra sticky glue. Widespread, racially based disturbances in Cincinnati following the killing of an...
Decked out with Composite Wood ; Americans Are Looking for Long-Lasting, Low-Maintenance Deck Materials
With Des Moines, Iowa, warming up, Joan McCloskey looks forward to relaxing outdoors when she gets home from work at Better Homes and Gardens magazine. A senior executive building editor, she often heads for a backyard deck that may, at first glance,...
Four Little Walls, One Great Escape
It's easy for us to get away from it all on our 80-acre farm: We simply walk along the cowpaths from the house at the road front to the little log cabin set back amid the sugar maples. There are no roads to the cabin, so drop-in visitors are rare....
It's Spring - Now's the Time to Think about Flowers and Shrubs
The best garden reference books offer more than you expect. In the new edition of "Taylor's Guide to Perennials" (Houghton Mifflin, $23), Barbara Ellis suggests a new way of looking at these popular flowering plants. Gardeners often turn to perennials...
Kuwait Shifts Welfare Costs to Immigrants ; Kuwait Now Has an Answer to Its Economic Quandary: It's Asking Foreign Workers to Pay for Health Insurance
Kuwait offers generous benefits to citizens: free health and education, subsidized electricity, money gifts to newlyweds and for each child, and low-interest home loans. But in Kuwait and throughout the Persian Gulf, government officials are wrestling...
Letters
Western lands aren't just for Westerners Your April 17 opinion piece, "Bush's drive for Western balance," by William Perry Pendley of the Mountain States Legal Foundation (MSLF) represents a particularly hypocritical and self-serving point of view...
Meridian Goes Multimodal
There's probably no bigger fan of railroad-station renewal than John Robert Smith, the mayor of Meridian, Miss. At his fiancee's suggestion, Mr. Smith celebrated the rebirth of Meridian's Union Station by getting married on the premises the day after...
News You May Have Missed ; Originally Printed as an Editorial in the Christian Science Sentinel
Just about anything qualifies as news these days. A celebrity's wedding, political gossip, who-wore-what to the Academy Awards. When something truly big happens, on the magnitude of a major scientific advance, one naturally assumes the story will get...
Polish Town Confronts Its History ; an Expose Blaming Poles for a 1941 Massacre of Jews Forces a Dismantling of the Official
A bell peels in a church steeple above a small square in the dreary hollow of Jedwabne, some 90 miles northeast of Warsaw. For more than half a century, this rural town concealed a terrible secret. In the summer of 1941, shortly after Nazi troops...
Rhetoric Hardens as Spy-Plane Talks Begin ; US Will Push for Continued Surveillance and Return of Its Plane, as PR War Mounts
In its meeting in Beijing this week to discuss the recent midair collision between a Chinese fighter and a US spy plane, the United States has several important goals. It wants to clearly and forcefully make the point that such surveillance flights...
Russia's Dying Free Press
Valery Popov, the gaunt, snow-haired editor of the Russian newspaper Voronezh Times, pulls his turtleneck up to his chin in his heatless office and regards the day's edition with evident distaste: four pages so thin you could sip borscht through them....
Senior Role Models - Too Busy to Count Their Age
Role models for young people take many forms: a teacher whose can- do spirit inspires confidence. A relative who influences a career choice. A coach or a first boss who encourages success. But once adulthood arrives, the emphasis on role models fades....
Sneaking a Love of Reading through Cinema's Back Door
"What's your favorite movie?" I heard my second-grade daughter ask her friend in the back seat of my car. "Um ... I don't know," she stalled, adding brightly, "but I can tell you what my favorite book is!" Good choice of friend, I thought, hoping...
Students Use Their Noodles to Make Meals
When college student Toni Patrick returned from spring break a few years ago, she was short on cash and faced a scant cupboard of instant ramen noodles, frozen peas, and canned tuna. Then inspiration hit: Why not test the boundaries of the ramen flavor...
USA
Consumer prices edged up 0.1 percent in March, the smallest rise in seven months, as energy costs retreated, the Labor Department reported. The small jump in the consumer price index, the government's most closely watched inflation gauge, followed...
US and China Talk Planes, Fly Zones, Fair Play ; Meeting in Beijing Today to Discuss Whose Laws Govern the Right to Fly Where
For the first time since the US aircrew detained in China returned to American shores, officials from the two countries will meet here today to discuss what happened and how to proceed. Three items are on China's agenda: the cause of the crash, the...
US Hands in the Mideast
Bill Clinton used to say the United States could not really negotiate peace in a conflict unless the warring parties grew weary of fighting. Still, he tried to be a hand-holder in many a world trouble spot. Almost the same statement was made by the...
What the Bush Budget Does for Children ; It Puts New Money into After-School Programs - but Also Reduces Subsidies for Child Care, Say Critics
Just before lunch on a rainy spring morning, more than 100 toddlers and preschoolers are creating their own sunshine inside the Ruggles/Gilday Early Education Center in Boston. Four-year-old Zaida, wearing a red plastic smock, "paints" with shaving...
Where Conversations Bloom
Joan, and daughter Donna, are definitely among the hopeful ones. They run a small flower and gift shop in the Scottish town of Carnoustie. "There are always the hopeful ones," Joan says, nimbly contriving a bow in two-tone green ribbon to tie an immaculately...
With Peace Gone, Israel Takes Land ; the Israeli Army Yesterday Retook Part of the Gaza Strip in the First Land Seizure since the 1993 Oslo Accord
In 1967, the Israelis seized a densely populated Palestinian territory called the Gaza Strip from Egypt. In 1994, they ceded most of it to the Palestinians. But what the Israelis gave, they have - in part - taken back. On Monday night and early Tuesday...
World
Israeli troops were back in control of parts of the Gaza Strip after an overnight assault in retaliation for mortar fire admitted to by the militant Palestinian group Hamas. One person died and 36 others were reported hurt in the Israeli attack, which...