The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from July 17, 2001

America's Widening Teacher Gap ; Schools Try Signing Bonuses, Recruiting Abroad, and Even the Controversial Step of Easing Certification Standards
American public schools are facing one of the most severe teacher shortages in history. While the problem has existed for several years, it is suddenly becoming more acute as a surge in the number of retiring teachers collides with rapid growth in...
Bombs Away ... from My Backyard ; Pullback from Vieques Island Signals New Level of Civilian Opposition to US Military
At island after island in the Pacific during World War II, US ground forces famously stormed ashore under cover of booming guns from warships offshore. They did the same at Inchon, South Korea, during the early 1950s. And at Grenada during the 1980s...
Bush and Nixon: Practical Conservatives
On more than one occasion, I informed readers that Bill Clinton reminded me of Franklin D. Roosevelt (whom he idolized). Having noted this, a friend asked, "But who does George W. Bush remind you of?" I chewed this question over for awhile. No president...
Chavez Support Fragile, but Remains Intact ; Charismatic Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez Masterfully Holds on to Power
When Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez assembled his ministers before a national television audience to give his version of the capture of Peruvian fugitive Vladimiro Montesinos, it was vintage Chavez. For months, he had denied that South America's...
Everything Is Up-to-Date in This High-Tech Dictionary
For many students, there is a certain reluctance that borders on fear and loathing when faced with the prospect of opening and searching through a dictionary. The small type and long lists of definitions can often deter those in search of a word or...
His Vision: Down-to-Earth Olympics
Faster, higher, and - smaller. That could be the motto of the man picked to lead the International Olympic Committee (IOC) through the early years of the 21st century. A Belgian orthopedic surgeon with a mastery of five languages, Jacques Rogge is...
In a Technocratic Age, Study of the Liberal Arts Is Even More Important
Alongside the breakdown of the family, the decline of the church, and the fragmenting of local community over the last third of the 20th century, I want to propose that the loss of the liberal arts may be having comparably deep consequences for American...
It Really Is Proving to Be a Worldwide Web ; A Rural Cambodian Village Learns to Go Online
In the dusty suburbs of Phnom Penh, Cambodia's capital, paved roads disintegrate into muddy tracks, phones are rare, and battered three-wheeled taxis are the only means of public transportation. Many children never go to school, and even those who...
Kashmir - No Mere Molehill ; Working off the Chemistry of Its Leaders, India and Pakistan's Summit Ends with Promise of More Talks
After three days of marathon meetings, lavish banquets, and peevish finger-pointing, the leaders of India and Pakistan have reached only the most basic agreement of all: simply to meet again.Part homecoming, blind date, and high-stakes poker game,...
Meet the Beetles and Spiders, Too ; You're Sure to Be Bugged but You'll Probably Enjoy It When You Visit This Zoo
Cleopatra cannot see very far, even though she has eight eyes. So it was probably her hairy legs - she has eight of those, too - that sensed the cricket's presence. (The hairs are super sensitive to vibrations.) In any case, the Mexican red knee tarantula...
Profile Rises for Multiracial People ; Americans of Mixed Ancestry Come from a Wide Variety of Communities and Tend to Be Young
Multiracial Americans - one of the nation's most dynamic groups - pose a growing challenge to traditional notions about racial identity. They're adding new hues to the complexion of America. They're blurring distinctions among black and white, Asian...
Read My Lips
It took some creativity for Chris Stringer to persuade his wife to listen to him read one of his favorite books. "He suggested reading 'Dracula,' " Jennifer remembers. "When it came to horror books, I was like, 'Oh, yuck.' " The couple lives in St....
Sleepless in Shenzhen: A Lonely Hearts Talk Show ; Radio Host Taps Concerns of a Young, Newly Alone Generation in Shenzhen, China's Test City for Capitalism
It's 10 p.m., and the phone calls to Hu Xiaomei's radio show, "Empty Night, Not Alone," are coming in fast and furious. The first guest, a 22-year-old woman, has a typical problem: her boyfriend. He wants to move in with her, he says, to protect her....
The Games China Won't Win
To recover from the humiliation of defeat, a Chinese proverb advises: One should swallow up the pain the way one takes the bitterness of the gall, prepare hard, and bid for the right time for revenge. The time came for China last Friday. Seven years...
The New Face of International Affairs
After reporting on the Rwandan genocide for six years, Ugandan journalist Dismas Nkunda wanted to do something more than write about victims of these tragedies. Quitting journalism, he joined the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees and worked...
Vote Tally in '00: Off by Millions ; Most Far-Reaching Study So Far Cites Faulty Machines, Problems with Voter Registration
More than eight months after the 2000 presidential election, new evidence is confirming what many Americans already suspected: The system failed to take into account vast numbers of legitimate votes, effectively disenfranchising millions of people....
Would the Learned Counsel Please Stop Screaming?
An Ohio lawyer bops a secretary over the head with a cellphone. An attorney in a Massachusetts courtroom calls opposing counsel "bald-faced liars." In Michigan, two lawyers get into a fistfight - in front of a judge. As these recent incidents reveal,...
Wrapped in the Rhythm of Words
Words have at least two lives: one visual and silent; one sonorous, carried on the undulations of the air. I sometimes find, when I am reading, that words demand to have that second life. That if anyone is nearby to hear, a certain phrase simply ...