The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from March 25, 2002

An Uneasy Iraq Awaits US Move ; Recent Defectors Describe a 'Siege' Mentality in Baghdad and Demoralized, Ready-to-Jump Troops
Tough American rhetoric about toppling Iraqi strongman Saddam Hussein, and the resolve shown by US forces in Afghanistan, is causing deep unease in Baghdad. Iraq's military forces are now on the highest state of alert, and intelligence services and a...
Applaud the Campaign Bill as a First Step
THE elation among reformers over the Senate's passage of campaign finance reform last week was immediately dampened by a chorus of cynics. "The bill is patently unconstitutional and will be thrown out by the Supreme Court." "Money will flow just as rapidly...
Backlash Grows against White House Secrecy ; in Congress and the Courts, Challenges to Bush's Tight Control of Information Rise. Energy Papers Due out Today
From the very start, George W. Bush made it clear that his would be a leak-tight White House. In the past year, he has succeeded to a remarkable degree, and is even carrying that promise far beyond his relationship with the media. In an attempt to reinforce...
Before You Pop the Hood ; Should You Wheel to the Dealer When Car Trouble Hits, or to a Good Local Garage? the Options Are Narrowing
High-tech parts, specialized tools shift advantage to big dealers. Having your car break down is frustrating - worse when you don't know where to turn to get it fixed. Many car owners have heard horror stories about having, say, a new fuel system prescribed...
Bush Plans Super-Agency to Improve US-Border Control ; Merging INS and Customs Is on Par with Kennedy's Creation of NASA - It Isn't Easy
Keep America safe by keeping terrorists out. That's the simple driving vision behind a Bush administration plan to merge the nation's major border-guarding forces into a single super-agency. Yet the new plan faces a complicated and tough reality. America's...
Car-Care Routes Merge to One Lane
Every so often, my Honda dealer sends a postcard inviting me to swing by with my six-year-old Odyssey for some 28-point check or other. On it, the service department earnestly lists such tasks as "check washer-fluid level," and "examine tires for wear."...
China Faces Growing Labor Unrest ; Workers in Liaoyang Are Threatening to March Again This Week If Protest Leaders Are Not Freed from Jail
The main road into Fushun in China's northern "rust belt" is lined with weedy factory yards and brick buildings so crumbled it appears a marauding army passed through. Last week, as part of a large wave of labor protests in northern China, an army did...
Diamonds in the Rough ; as Baseball Season Opens This Weekend, One-Fourth of America's Pro Players Come from One Caribbean Nation, the Dominican Republic
This is where the day begins, on a rocky beach by the Caribbean Sea, as the sun rises above the water and the wind whips into the small shops that line the seawall. The boys are like drones, silent, their heads lowered as they sprint toward the west....
Factory Towns Still Shed Jobs ; in Mississippi River Communities, Uptick in Economy Doesn't Stop Tide of Layoffs
Five blocks south of the village hall in Roxana, Ill., Route 111 stretches into a neat dividing line. On one side, one of the nation's oldest refineries (now owned by Phillips 66) produces some 300,000 barrels of oil products a day. "Our operation is...
For Ex-Cons, Help Breaking into the Workforce
On Dec. 7, after spending 10 years behind bars, Dwayne Eckhoff, a former drug addict and convicted burglar, left a South Dakota prison with $50 in "gate money" and 30 days to find work or risk going back. His quest for work was long, but it paid off:...
For Peru's Toledo, Return of Peace Corps Is Personal ; on Saturday, the US Signed an Agreement to Reintroduce the Program after 27 Years
Amid heightened security following last week's explosion outside the US Embassy here, President Bush's arrival Saturday marked the first visit to Peru by a sitting US president. The trip was billed as part of Mr. Bush's commitment to Latin America that...
Grandparents Adopt 'Money Mentor' Role ; They Step in to Help Parents Short on Time - and Young Kids Who Need Help with an Often-Ignored Discipline
When Peggy Houser heard that her grandchildren weren't being given their small weekly allowances, she offered to take over the task for her daughter, who had simply been forgetting to dole it out. But she didn't stop there. Mrs. Houser wanted to be more...
Indonesia Takes Bite out of Corruption ; Trial Resumes Wednesday of Tommy Suharto
Indonesia, perhaps the world's most corrupt country, may be cleaning up its reputation. The trial of the favorite son of Indonesia's longtime dictator Suharto, which resumes Wednesday, is seen as a barometer of an effective justice system in a country...
In This Ring, a Tale of Two Washingtons ; Many Residents Want the City to Stage the Mike Tyson Fight Because It Would Bring in $8 Million. Others Worry about What It Would Mean to the Capital City's Image
As the House and Senate debated high-toned issues ranging from the new terror-alert system to the ceiling on the federal debt, the "other" Washington was engaged in its own discussion: whether convicted felon Mike Tyson should be allowed to box in the...
Is March Madness a Good Bet for Office Output?
At a downtown financial firm, the television is on and tuned in. Not to the war in Afghanistan, or to an address by Alan Greenspan, but to college basketball. On the screen, there are Hoosiers and Sooners, upsets and college bands roiling far- off stadiums...
Letters
Campaign reform starts with everyday people Regarding "Money in politics: a new route" (March 22): Instead of reducing the influence of money in politics and bringing people back into the picture, the proposed campaign-finance-reform legislation legitimizes...
Liberty Balance
CIVIL liberties and the war on terrorism still are in an uneasy coexistence a half year after Sept. 11. So far, the Bush administration seems sensitive to the idea that ensuring the nation's freedom from terror does not require a self-inflicted erosion...
More Funds Fall - or Emerge Reinvented
Putnam Investments surprised some of its investors last week, when it announced the scuttling of 11 of its 66 funds. Ten of the funds will be consolidated into other Putnam funds. One will be scrapped. The 11 funds account for about 2.4 percent of the...
Piecing Together a Life
Quilts are like warm cocoons. They are tidbits of love's history bound together for generations to dream in. My grandmother often pointed to her quilts and, in her honey-sweet southern accent, described the former lives of the fabrics: my great-grandmother's...
Power Deregulation: Positive Surge, or Short Circuit?
So far, the decade-long effort to create a workable, competitive market for electricity in the United States has been mostly a flop. In about 16 states, generating a third of the nation's power supply, retail customers have a choice of power providers,...
Serene Portraits by a Fiery Master
Francisco Goya, Spanish master painter of the 18th century, based the enduring achievement of his portraits on the "solid testimony of truth" - the premise he once inscribed on a sketch in his own hand. Gone were fussy backgrounds, elaborate props, and...
Snow Recedes, and Treasures Emerge
When I brought my new son, Anton, home from a Ukrainian orphanage a scant three months ago, it was to a world where the rivers and lakes were ice-locked and the land covered in snow. Maine in winter is a thing to behold, and my home is utterly representative...
Tensions High as Shiites March in Pakistan ; Thousands of Minority Muslims Will March in Pakistan's Streets Today in a Yearly Religious Procession
By the tens of thousands they march through the streets of Pakistan, beating their backs and chests with chains and knives, mourning the murder of an Islamic figure killed 14 centuries ago today. The scene on this 10th day of the Muslim month of Muharram...
What Fees to Expect in a Retirement-Fund Rollover
Q: I was recently let go by my company. I have $70,000 in my 401(k) plan and have been looking for a brokerage firm to take it over. I spoke to a stock broker. One part I do not understand is the fee the brokerage will charge to administer the plan....
When College Doesn't Knock ; Try a Year of Punctuality 101 and Economics 6.25
Okay, so the high-school senior who occasionally bathes and shows up for meals at your place didn't wind up on a college's "most wanted" list. It's not the end of the world, but over the past year or so, filmmakers have skewed our view of college entrance...