The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from June 21, 2001

An Aussie Shift on Gambling ; Restrictions on New Slot Machines and On-Line Games Set to Take Effect
Gabriela Byrne's relationship with Australia's slot machines began after she had an argument with her boss. "This little voice popped up in my head and said: 'Why don't you go to the pub and forget about it?' " So she did. Within months, the afternoon...
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As North Atlantic Current Slows, Concern Rises
Each second, millions of cubic meters of cold, dense Arctic seawater slip over the top of an undersea ridge stretching between Greenland and Scotland, then slide thousands of meters to the floor of the Atlantic to begin a journey of global proportions....
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A Voyage to the Top of the World for Tons of Worthless Rock
It's a story overlooked in high school history books, but England's first attempt to colonize the Americas began in the Arctic. As far as failures are concerned, it was rather unspectacular, but it has all the right ingredients for a delectable fable:...
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Broadband Broadsided
For most people, there's a gap between what the Internet can potentially deliver - movies, videoconferencing, and fast, smooth uninterrupted service - and what they can actually receive in their homes. But it's not a gap that's causing much protest....
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Build US Security on Goodwill, Not Bombs
In President Bush's first meeting with his Russian counterpart, he stressed the need for a system to defend against missile attacks from so-called rogue nations. According to press accounts, President Putin was polite in his continued opposition to...
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Can Governor Win California Power Play? ; Gray Davis Faced Senate Yesterday with (Some) Renewed Momentum - but a Hot Summer Ahead
California Gov. Gray Davis comes to Washington this week with some surprising momentum - and a chance to reframe the debate over who's to blame for his state's energy crisis. The governor, whose poll numbers had plunged just as fast as Golden State...
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Chicken Soup of Sympathy ; Bringing a Spiritual Perspective to Daily Life
Maybe it's because I'm from a large family. As a child, one way of getting individual attention was to be sick. When I was sick, I got to be alone with Mom, and sometimes she would go out and buy me a soft drink to go with my soup. Tea and sympathy,...
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Defining 'Hispanic' and 'Latino'
Centuries ago, the Irish were considered by the English to be a separate race. But as the Irish arrived in the United States, into a social context that included immigrants from all over the world, the Irish came to be thought of as just another ethnic...
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Demographics Drive the Latino Media Story
Rural Georgia is not the place you'd expect to find a boom in Spanish-language media. But Dalton, a small town in the north, is now home to three Spanish-language newspapers and a Spanish- language pop radio station. Hispanic media have grown in...
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Don't Kill for Me ; Families Cope with Grief at Loss of Loved Ones by Seeking Alternatives to the Death Penalty
"In memory of Julie Welch and the 167 others killed in Oklahoma City, and with prayer for Timothy McVeigh and the persons who are his executioners...," says Bud Welch, as he casts the first shovelful of soil onto the newly planted tree in Boston....
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Etc
A LITTLE BIRDIE TOLD ME In Chongqing, China, a woman - we'll call her Li - visited her attorney last week and took along her pet mynah. Not because she can't bear to be parted from the talking bird but because she thought it might prove helpful to...
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EU Is Blocking Major US Merger ; Unless Either Side Relents in the Next Three Weeks, the Mega General Electric-Honeywell Deal Could Be History
If two American companies decide to merge, and US antitrust regulators approve the deal, they go ahead and merge, right? Wrong.In today's globalized world, European and other foreign regulators can block an American deal if the parties do much business...
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Is a Park a Playground or Preserve? ; Today, in Alabama, Bush Will Argue for a Leading Preservation Program
Ever since the early days of America's land-conservation movement - when Teddy Roosevelt was sealing off vast tracts of the nation's wilderness - there's been tension over how such treasures should be used: Are they playgrounds for citizens to revel...
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Making the World Safe from Truth ; the Story of How American Pragmatism Demolished 'Certainty'
In 1776, a congress of savvy landowners in Philadelphia announced to the world (particularly to King George) that they held self- evident truths. One hundred years later, a few misfit geniuses in Boston confessed that they could hold no truths at...
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My, What Nice Teeth You Have ; More New Yorkers Are Hurt by Squirrels, but Sharks Still Get a Bad Rap
Do yourself a favor: Don't take this deadly school of books to the beach. I did, and it was a mistake. Every sprig of passing seaweed was a reef shark. A floating chunk of Styrofoam was the belly of a great white. Michael Capuzzo's Close to Shore...
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Science vs. Indian Tradition in 'Kennewick Man' Case ; the Legal Fight, Being Argued This Week, Could Set a Precedent in How Tribal Remains Are Handled
Which is more true: The historical data you can measure, weigh, and record? Or the evidence that comes from a heartfelt history passed along since before recorded time? And what happens if the fundamental values behind one version of truth conflict...
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Shifting Tactics on Tobacco ; Ashcroft Moves to Settle Lawsuit, While Congress Considers FDA Oversight of Drug
The move this week by Attorney General John Ashcroft to begin negotiations with Big Tobacco over a multibillion-dollar lawsuit may signal a new approach to how the Justice Department handles major cases under the Bush administration. Analysts say...
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Some Breathing Room for Beirut ; on Monday, Syrian Troops Finished the Largest Pullout from Beirut since the Lebanese Civil War Ended
The sudden withdrawal of some 7,000 Syrian troops from positions in Beirut over the past week wasn't the first such move, but it was the largest and most public redeployment from Beirut since the end of Lebanon's civil war in 1990. Nonetheless, the...
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The Fall and Rise of 20th-Century Investing ; Ordinary People Wouldn't Buy Stocks till the Market Seemed Fair
During the early 20th century, the stock markets were like an Olympus where the citizens below the mount could only watch the clashes of the financial titans, writes B. Mark Smith, a former equity trader and vice president at Goldman Sachs. Speculators...
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The New Neighborhood Watch, Soviet Style
Every afternoon in Russia's second city, a laser technician and two college students don red armbands and big badges to play policeman. They are among initial recruits in a controversial effort to revive the Soviet practice of civilian street patrols....
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Uncle Harold Gets His Dream House, after All
For years, Uncle Harold thought about building a house on the woodchopper's old woodlot. But never in his wildest dreams did he believe he'd need a dowser to get it done. The wooded 40 acres and its tar-paper shack had entered Uncle Harold's life...
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Uninvited Reenactors Win This Civil War Skirmish ; with a Canvas Tent and a Period Federal Uniform, MY SON Is Ready for Action
Now that the weather has warmed, my son, Tim, and his pal Dan spend many a weekend indulging their interest in Civil War reenacting, using our farm's hilltop pasture as their camp headquarters. Tim's birthday and Christmas requests over the past several...
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USA
In a surprise move, the Justice Department was reported to be considering an out-of-court settlement of its own lawsuit against the tobacco industry. Some public health advocates said they were worried that the Bush administration will not seek a...
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US Drivers Want Better Mileage When They Fill Up ; by a Nearly 5-to-1 Margin, Americans Surveyed Say They Would Favor a New Law That Would Force Car Manufacturers to Increase Auto and Truck Fuel Mileage
Driving a 2001 Ford Taurus 500 miles from Washington, D.C., to Boston would burn about 20 gallons of gasoline. If reformers get their way, the same trip in a new fuel-efficient family sedan would use just 12 gallons of gas by 2012. With strong public...
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When a Brother Murders, What Does a Brother Do?
Bill Babbitt and David Kaczynski share a special bond and burden born of tragedy. They both took the wrenching step of turning in a brother for committing murder. In giving the FBI the break in the Unabomber case, Mr. Kaczynski and his family were...
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Will Japan's Sun Rise with Koizumi?
Is Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi a great reformer who will pull Japan out of its decade-long economic slump and lead the country to its rightful place among the world's leading nations, or is he just an old-fashioned politician with an unconventional...
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World
With 18 months left in office, Pakistan's president was fired by military ruler Pervez Musharraf, who appointed himself to the post. He also dismissed parliament. The move drew angry protest from the nation's political leaders and legal community,...
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