The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from November 6, 2003

A Big Detour and a Little Excitement
One weekend recently I was on my way home with the Haines (Alaska) High School cross- country running team when we picked up lunch and something to read in the Seattle airport.Seattle is not on the way to Haines. It is almost 1,000 miles in the wrong...
Activists Win a Round in TV's Culture War ; in Face of Conservative Ire, CBS Pulls Reagan Miniseries
It's a familiar drill in the culture wars: Break out the poster board, fire off letters to advertisers, and take to the airwaves, decrying a piece of art or entertainment that activists believe is inaccurate or beyond the pale of good taste. It's been...
After the Flames ; as the Smoke Clears in California, Ecologists Examine the Long-Term Impact of Blazes on Air, Soil, and Wildlife
As firefighters mopped up after a heroic defense of historic Julian, Calif., ecologist Scott Morrison walked along a nearby ridge and looked out on a scene that many people might find discouraging.A vast tract of conservation land - home to unique and...
After Yukos, West Doubts Putin's Motives
Russian President Vladimir Putin begins his summit with democratic European leaders Thursday with dented democratic credentials.Mr. Putin insists that the arrest of Russian oil tycoon Mikhail Khodorkovsky on tax and fraud charges is simply a case of...
Anatomy of a Mutual Fund Scandal ; Separate Complaints against Prudential's Martin Druffner Offer a Window into the Scrutiny of Fund Industry
Up the street from the Boston Marathon starting line lives Wall Street's latest alleged villain, Martin Druffner.His half-million-dollar white colonial house, with a Mercedes sedan parked in the driveway, doesn't quite measure up to the golden lifestyle...
Can Your Razor Blade Spy on You?
Each year, businesses lose billions of dollars in inventory that simply disappears. While thieves account for some of the loss, a second category has troubled company executives more - merchandise that vanishes into a faulty record-keeping system. A...
Einstein Wins Again - for Now
Einstein's theory of special relativity stands as one of the pillars of modern physics. That's why physicists - ever wary of the foundation - keep looking for cracks.Some thought they had found one with "fast-light" materials. When light pulses travel...
For Me, a Bus Trip Is Not Just the Ticket
My dad used to tell a story, laughing at his own expense. One day, for some reason, he was car-less. Maybe the car was in the repair shop. Anyway, he found himself standing alone on a street corner, waiting for a local bus. He literally couldn't remember...
'Free Trade' Takes Increasing Hits ; Expanding Global Commerce Has Long Been Considered an Engine of Growth, but Job Losses at Home Stir Criticism
Free trade, long a controversial theme in America's political and economic life, is stirring a new level of contention.Some Democratic presidential candidates such as Richard Gephardt are winning applause with comments that tap into angst over jobs lost...
GOP Clout Rises in South ; Gains of Two Governorships in Region Adds to a Republican Realignment
Republicans and Democrats may disagree over the national significance of this week's GOP gubernatorial gains in Kentucky and Mississippi.But on a practical level, the effect of these off-year elections is clear: The Republican Party has further expanded...
In Uzbekistan, Religion Is Victim of War on Terror
Imagine the police forcing a gas mask onto your head and shutting off the air supply - because you are "guilty" of hosting Bible studies in your own home. Imagine having to organize worship services in deep secrecy, meeting outdoors far from any inhabited...
Law Schools Revolt over Pentagon Recruitment on Campus ; Some Have Filed Suit against the Military in Protest of What They See as Discrimination towards Gays in the Service
Some of America's top law schools are heading to court themselves. Their target: a Pentagon policy requiring them to allow military recruiters on campus. At issue is the military's "don't ask, don't tell" policy towards gays and whether the government...
Letters
Don't forget all the personal jabs at ClintonI read with interest Godfrey Sperling's Nov. 4 column on the "personal" nature of current anti-Bush sentiment, noting his apt comparison to the "personal" attacks on President Franklin D. Roosevelt ("Plumbing...
Matrix Film Is for Neo-Phytes Only
'The Matrix Revolutions" brings the hugely popular "Matrix" trilogy to a close. And whatever you think of this last installment, you must admit it constitutes a close.That's more than you can say for the second chapter, "The Matrix Reloaded," which didn't...
New Minimum Wage in S.F., Same Mayor in Philadelphia
There will be no nonpartisan elections in New York City. No megacasino along Maine's coast. No new rules to govern the physical stress of mouse-clicking in Washington State, no mass meditations for harried Denverites. In an overlooked election, most...
Nothing for Something
Residents of Maine, sometimes called "Maniacs," certainly made a sane and sensible decision Tuesday not to build a $650 million resort casino complex in their state - even though the campaign to build the giant casino was fierce and, with $10 million...
Scientists Scan Mud for Hurricane Patterns
To find out what makes a hurricane tick, you have to fly through it. To find out how often hurricanes strike land, you need to dig for them.As more condos, office towers, and housing tracts spring up in cities along America's East and Gulf coasts, researchers...
Setback for Peace in Sri Lanka? ; the President Declared an Emergency Wednesday after a Rebel Offer Raised Hopes
For months, the Sri Lankan peace process seemed to be the single most positive news trend in South Asia. But now a feud within the Sri Lankan government itself may put negotiations on hold for good.On Wednesday, President Chandrika Kumaratunga, declared...
The Cloning Clash ; Does the World Need Cloning Research? UN Members Tackle a Topic That Leaves Many Uneasy
Around the globe there is nearly universal agreement that "reproductive cloning" - the effort to create cloned human beings - is wrong.But when it comes to "therapeutic cloning" - developing stem cells from human embryos that could be used to treat diseases...
The 'Mouse' That Caused an Uproar in China
The "stainless-steel mouse" is her cyber nom de plume. Her name is Liu Di, and in the one picture available, she has a young face and a wide, shy smile. Until the authorities tracked her down a year ago Friday, she was one of the most famous Internet...
The Playful Wit of Games
A tiger constructed of rails and roads and wheels. This witty image by Abram Games (1914-1996) is in a show of original artwork for posters at London's Transport Museum (until Jan. 4). London Transport has had a long history of commissioning posters...
The Risks of Rapid 'Iraqification' ; A Transfer of Policing Duties to Iraqis Could Reduce US Casualties, but Moving Too Quickly May Fail to Quell the Violence
The way to solve the security problem in Iraq, says the White House, is to transfer responsibility for keeping the peace to Iraqis themselves as soon as possible.It's a strategy with obvious advantages. Iraqis might be better than Americans at tracking...
Two-Year Campaign for Four-Year Term - Blame Parties
The presidential election is still a year away, yet nine or 10 Democratic candidates have been campaigning hard for a year already. That's a two-year campaign for a four-year term - far too long. Western European nations, all functioning democracies,...
When Disability Meets God's Ability ; Bringing a Spiritual Perspective to Daily Life
His name was B. He was Kurdish and in the third grade. Because his reading level was comparable to a beginning first grader, he and I read together, trying to bridge that learning gap.B's parents reported that he hadn't talked until he was five years...
Why Anti-US Fighting Grows in Iraq ; the US Headquarters Compound in Baghdad Was Attacked Twice This Week
A full-page notice in the Baghdad daily Al Sabah carries good news for thousands of former civilian employees - many now unemployed - of Saddam Hussein's ousted regime. They will be able to collect three months' salary as a kind of back pay.But the ad...