The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from April 17, 2003

About CNN: Hold Your Fire
Journalists like to tell stories. Besides a dislike for math, it's probably what draws most reporters get into the profession in the first place. And when journalists are away from work and among others of their own ilk, they still tell stories. Things...
A Cold Flame ; in Anita Shreve's Newest Historical Romance, a Stuffy Professor Finds His Life Consumed by a Woman He Can Never Possess
Even at The Christian Science Monitor, opening the book packages that pour in every day is a dirty business. I used to come home with my shirt smudged black till I found a solution. But now, no matter how many times I remind my colleagues that I'm wearing...
A Crusade after All? ; Plans of Some Christians to Evangelize as They Offer Aid Pose Dilemma for Iraqi Reconstruction
When President Bush called his war on terrorism a "crusade," he backtracked quickly in the face of intense reaction at home and abroad. Now many people are worried that, in the case of Iraq, that inopportune choice of words may turn out to hold more...
Americans Open Their Wallets for Iraqis ; from Adopting Pets to Sending Soap, US Public Pitches In
Frustrated by images of chaos and violence unfolding on the other side of the globe, Leigh Evans decided to do something concrete to help. The result: free yoga classes and fundraising help for a humanitarian-aid group.Ms. Evans enlisted 40 San Francisco...
A Monitor Guide to the Bestsellers
133Leap of FaithLisa Halaby was among the first women admitted to Princeton, but it is her marriage to King Hussein of Jordan in 1978 that distinguishes her life. Noor's memoir describes her transformation from shy American to confident queen, a partner...
A New Window on Drug Blight ; in Stricken Part of Philadelphia, a Bus Tour Moves Residents to Address Drug Culture
It's not your standard bus tour. For three hours, passengers on the Drug War Reality Tour ride through North Philadelphia's neighborhood of Kensington, seldom disembarking to see the sights on this trail of smuggling and addiction.A short ride from Philadelphia's...
Art, and My Imagination, Go Technicolor ; in '60S Art, Wonderful, Frivolous Color Started Bursting out Everywhere like Wayward Fireworks
Until then, sculpture had been brown. I exaggerate. But when, in the 1960s, I first saw the work of young sculptors making brightly colored sculpture out of fiberglass and painted steel, it was as if a fascinating new element had been invited into the...
Bastion of Buddhism Faces Gender Debate ; A Female Monk Enlists Thailand's Senate in Her Uphill Battle against a Ban on the Ordination of Women
From the outside, it looks like any other temple in Thailand, a country that considers itself a bastion of Buddhist culture. A cluster of modest wooden buildings and a well-kept lawn hide behind a 15-foot-high golden Buddha that faces the busy highway...
Be All That You Can Be - or More ; the Drug Industry Has Something Just for You
"Makeover" is a tantalizing word. Who can fail to be intrigued, however fleetingly, by "before" and "after" pictures showing the transforming power of a stylish haircut and artfully applied makeup or weight loss and a face lift? Dentists even advertise...
China Is Ready to Get Back on Track ; the Chinese Face Stiff Challenges in Their Effort to Take Back the World
What of China? Government officials, business leaders, scholars, and journalists have asked that question for more than a century. So- called "China hands" have provided conflicting answers. While some have asserted that the Communist regime would develop...
City Workers Swell Layoff Ranks ; New York Announces Cuts of at Least 4,500 Employees, as Other Cities Face Difficult Decisions, Too
They call him Mike the Knife.Dressed in a somber gray pinstriped suit, New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg reluctantly lived up to the moniker this week as he announced at least 4,500 city workers will be laid off.That's a best-case scenario. If the state...
Cutting-Edge Biotech in Old-World Cuba
This crumbling, isolated throwback to a cold-war past is probably one of the last places you'd expect to find the sciences of the future.In Old Havana, wood-paneled pharmacies with crystal chandeliers and empty shelves attract more gawking tourists these...
Does Poetry Rhyme with Politics? ; Organizers of the First-Ever Conference of State Poets Laureate, Legislators, and Citizens Hope to Expand the Poets' Role
Maybe America is such a country that poets here can write without fear of censure or imprisonment. Maybe, unlike John Milton and Alexander Solzhenitsyn, they can choose to worry more about meter than the political implications of their poems. Maybe in...
Fighting Words
Even as the battle winds down, the words of war linger: the high- minded speeches with their promises and persuasions, the grim dispatches from the field.The urgency of the hour can turn commanders and journalists into poets. And poetry into politics...
If Everyone Can Read This, We're Too Close ; Half the World's Languages Are about to Go Silent, Taking Their Wisdom with Them
When there's trouble in the ecosphere, the frogs know it first. When there's trouble in what I'll call the ethnosphere, it shows up in language: portents like hastening language loss, and the rise of a linguistic monoculture.In his distressing new book,...
In Charge of Iraq - and Eager Not to Be
This week, retired US Gen. Jay Garner becomes one of the most important heads of state in the world and, he hopes, the one with the shortest term in power.His daunting task: to rebuild Iraq, help launch a stable government there, and then write himself...
In Congo, 'Peace Comes Dropping Slow' ; like the Yeats Poem, Calm Proves Elusive Even with a New Accord to End Years of War
Last week, Joseph Kabila, Congo's dapper young leader, stood before the country's Supreme Court with one hand on the new Constitution and the other holding aloft Congo's sky-blue flag. After 14 months of peace talks, Mr. Kabila, son of the assassinated...
In Korea Crisis, China Takes Lead ; the US and North Korea Agreed to Three-Way Talks in Beijing Next Week to Discuss the North's Nuclear Programs
That China has pulled off a diplomatic coup, engineering three- way talks with the US and North Korea to resolve the crisis over Kim Jong Il's nuclear programs, is a major surprise in Asia.For the first time in memory, experts say, Beijing is taking...
Iraqi Cells Disgorge Dark Secrets ; Relatives of Missing Iraqis Are Combing Empty Prisons for Any Trace of Their Loved Ones
At the infamous Abu Ghareb prison on the outskirts of Baghdad, the relatives of missing Iraqis comb through the detritus, hunting for clues to the fate of their relatives and best friends.Beside a photo laboratory inside the prison grounds, film of guards...
Love of Opera Transports Me Everywhere - Even Onstage
My love of opera has taken me from a seat at the Metropolitan Opera House in the Family Circle - the least expensive seats and acoustically the best, but a city block from the stage - to different parts of the world.To London, where with college friends...
New Cuban Rights Abuse: No Excuse to Slow US Outreach
Fidel Castro's response to the international condemnation following his recent roundup and sentencing of 75 Cuban dissidents has been to blame the United States.To be sure, chief US diplomat James Cason and others at the US mission in Havana have been...
Nigeria Tries to Break from Military Past ; Nigerians Choose a President on Saturday amid Accusations of Intimidation and Ballot Fraud
At a polling station in the boisterous Oshodi district of Lagos, Nigeria's commercial capital, voters were dismayed to find election materials in short supply for last weekend's Senate vote. The center had only 100 ballot sheets for an electorate of...
Outside the Meeting at Ur
About 150 Iraqis hoping to voice their opinions on Iraq's future sought admittance to a small, exclusive meeting of opposition leaders gathered by the US government.The meeting is the first of many to be held to determine the political future of Iraq....
Reforming Class-Action Suits
The Senate Judiciary Committee took an important step last week when it approved a bill to curb abuses in class-action lawsuits.Class actions are an important tool for protecting citizens' rights. But currently, most class-action suits must be heard...
Religion in the Americas Began 2250 BC ; Ancient Icon Found in Peru Is 1,000 Years Older Than Any Other Religious Artifact in the Region
Archaeologists combing rubble in an arid river valley that spills out onto the central coast of Peru have uncovered a 4,000-year-old gourd fragment that may represent the oldest religious object ever found in the Western Hemisphere.It bears an etched...
Reporters on the Job
* VISITING A LADY MONK: As a British journalist, Simon Montlake initially thought there would be parallels between the story about a female monk in Thailand (page 7), and the furor over the ordination of women as bishops in the Anglican church more than...
Scene from the Cuban Crackdown
Claudia Marquez Linares, an independent Cuban journalist, wrote a version of this article for CUBANET.ORG on March 20, two days after a roundup of dissidents began. Her husband, Osvaldo Alfonso Valdes, president of the opposition Liberal Democratic Party,...
Setbacks in Winning Iraqi Hearts ; by Friday, the US Army Will Establish a Central Point for Compensation Claims
The night after Baghdad fell, three Bradley Fighting Vehicles, fresh from battle, came across some Iraqi military trucks loaded with ordnance in residential District 405.What happened next would become a tragedy for both the American soldiers and the...
The Value of Your Life ; Bringing a Spiritual Perspective to Daily Life
One can only imagine what that man was thinking and feeling 350,000 years ago. Scientists in Italy speculate that the recently discovered footprints of a Stone Age man suggest that he was trying to escape the eruption of a volcano. They don't know for...
With War's End, Economic Uptick - but No Surge
Peace is good, but not good enough to jolt the world economy out of its current lackluster performance. That's what experts say about the global economic impact of American combat operations ending in Iraq. President Bush said earlier this week that...