Nineteenth-Century Prose

Articles from Vol. 33, No. 2, Fall

A Minute Stretching into Centuries: Macaulay, English, and India
The essay takes a close look at Macaulay's (in)famous "Minute" and reads it in the context of the nineteenth century situation in India--analyzing it in relation to Raja Rammohun Roy's wish list as well as situating it in terms of issues and ideals...
In Memoriam: Ruth apRoberts-November 14, 1919-March 26, 2006
Ruth ApRoberts, who spent her entire career as a professor at the University of California, Riverside, died suddenly on March 26, 2006. Almost to the very moment of her passing, she had maintained her engagement, indeed her life-long passion, for literary...
Introduction
This Introduction examines eight contributions that collectively exemplify a blend of continuity, reorientation, and innovation in Macaulay studies. They include a reconsideration of Macaulay's sibling relationships in the context of Evangelical attitudes...
Macaulay and the Historical Sublime, or Forgetting the Past and the Future
Historical narrative exists to desublimate our experience of the past, present, and future. Moreover, the arrangement of historical experience into narrative is an act of making the temporally and geographically sublime, epistemologically safe and...
Macaulay, "Lord Clive" and the Imperial Tradition
This paper examines Macaulay's review article "Lord Clive" as part of the historiography of British India. Along with "Warren Hastings," it was an expression of his version of the history of British India, which had been given blood and sinew in the...
Macaulay's History of England and the Dilemmas of Liberal Epic
This essay surveys Macaulay's early literary and cultural ambitions as he outlined them in the 1820s and then his later successes of the 1850s. It focuses primarily upon his efforts to recast neoclassical epic narrative and ideology for a modern liberal...
Macaulay's Paranoid Parliament: Queer Theory, Victorian Medicine, and the History of England
This essay brings Macaulay's History of England together with Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick's 1997 manifesto "On Paranoid Reading and Reparative Reading," to suggest that both thinkers participate in a long genealogy of paranoia whose consolidation can be...
Macaulay's Revolution: New Historicism, the Working Classes, and Elizabeth Gaskell's North and South
Thomas Babington Macaulay has been reductively positioned in criticism of Elizabeth Gaskell's North and South as a social critic unsympathetic to the plight of the working classes. This essay strives to revise these erroneous assumptions through a...
Precocity and Sibling Relations: Goethe and Macaulay Family Life Writing
This essay examines Macaulay's journals both as life writing in itself and as commentary on Goethe's autobiography. Macaulay's interest in Goethe lay in the autobiography's treatment of precocious boyhood, in particular the negotiation of parental...
The Ranks of Tuscany: Macaulay on Ranke's Die Romischen Papste
I examine Macaulay's review-essay on Leopold Ranke's History of the Popes as translated by Sarah Austin (for whose sake he seems to have embarked on it). Macaulay was profoundly impressed by Ranke's scientific methodology and mastery of diplomatic...