Nineteenth-Century Prose

Articles from Vol. 24, No. 2, Fall

But Who Is "She"?: Forms of Subjectivity in Walter Pater's Writings
In the past decade, commentators have concentrated on the complexities of male subjectivity and masculinity within Pater's writings. This essay suggests why, and how, Pater utilizes female figures to probe the historicity of identity, the emotional...
Charles Dickens, the Dent Uniform Edition of Dickens' Journalism: Volume II: The Amusements of the People and Other Papers: Reports, Essays and Reviews 1834-51
Charles Dickens, The Dent Uniform Edition of Dickens' Journalism: Volume II: The Amusements of the People and Other Papers: Reports, Essays and Reviews 1834-51, ed. Michael Slater (Ohio State UP, 1996), xxxix + 408 pp., $42 cloth In the second volume...
Doing Time
This article explores strategies for writing biography and late nineteenth-century culture without substantial resort to individual psychology. It attempts to explore the sociology of Pater's texts, principally through an examination of his publication...
Inhabiting the Electronic Text? Pater's Ethic of Reading in an On-Line Edition of "The Child in the House"
An electronic edition of a text originally created for print offers new possibilities for study, but differs significantly enough from print to require critical assessment. Walter Pater's sketch "The Child in the House," a retrospective examination...
Introduction
Responses of readers to Walter Pater's writings have always been diverse. It is not surprising, then, that the responses of the scholars represented in this collection of essays are diverse. No critical point of view dominates the criticism of Pater's...
On Pater's Late Style
Many critics have agreed that Pater's characteristic position in all his writing is that of the "latecomer" (in Harold Bloom's well-known formulation). This position as the end of a long critical tradition may be appreciated more fully if seen as a...
Pater in Italy
Pater first toured Italy in 1865 with Charles Lancelot Shadwell, to whom he later dedicated Studies in the History of the Renaissance (1873). As Michael Levey states in The Case of Walter Pater, the tour was the well-spring for most of the essays in...
Reaction to Saintsbury in Pater's Formulation of Ideas on Prose Style
The ideas expressed by Pater in "Style" were developed between 1886 and 1888 in four related works, the first of which was his review of Specimens of English Prose Style from Malory to Macaulay, by George Saintsbury, his younger contemporary, acquaintance,...
The Professor of Desire: Walter Pater in the Nineties (His and Ours)
Much recent analysis of Pater approaches his work as a legitimation of homoerotic desire. As this emphasis counters the subtle homophobia informing much modernist reception of Pater, it also entails renewed attention to Pater's original audiences,...
Walling out the World: Walter Pater and the Problem of Aesthetic Historicism
As his influence on thinking about a crisis of interpretation as the dominant intellectual problem of the late twentieth century has become more widely recognized, Pater has been held up as an exemplar of how to live in a state of textual, social,...
Walter Pater, Circe, and the Paths of Darkness
Although Homer's Circe traditionally has epitomized the sensual femme fatale, when Pater in his late novel, Gaston de Latour, compares Queen Marguerite to this goddess, he is drawing upon a little-known allegorizing of Circe by Giordano Bruno. In the...
Walter Pater's Essay "Diaphaneite" as a Bridge between Romanticism and Modernism
Pater's concept of the diaphanous character bears a striking resemblance to the idea of the transparent subject in the works of Novalis, as comparison of some passages shows. Pater's transformation of this Romantic idea reveals that he stands at the...
What Is Early and What Is Late in Pater's Work? the Evidence of a Reshuffled Text
The difficulties of distinguishing what is early from what is late in Pater's work are illustrated by a passage of some 370 words that appears both in the periodical version of chapter IV of Gaston de Latour and in chapter VII of Plato and Platonism....