Nineteenth-Century Prose

Articles from Vol. 28, No. 1, Spring

A.A. Bestuzhev-Marlinsky and the Critical Theory of the Novel
Alexander Alexandrovich Bestuzhev, under the pseudonym Marlinsky, became the most celebrated Russian fiction writer of the 1830s. He also wrote literary criticism, making a decisive but relatively unappreciated contribution to the critical theory of...
From the Editor
The Current issue of Nineteenth-Century Prose is a nice cross-section of where the journal has been and where it is headed. During the nearly ten years that I have edited the journal, we have gradually expanded the scope and approach to include Continental...
Matthew Arnold and Herbert Spencer: A Neglected Connection in the Victorian Debate about Scientific and Literary Education
Arnold's defense of literary culture and education against the advances of science has usually been examined with regard to his arguments with T.H. Huxley. But though little notice has been paid to it, Herbert Spencer was also an important figure for...
Rule, Victoria: An America by Another Name
In the past generation it has become common to describe a part of the American past as "Victorian." The present essay examines the emergence of that usage, and it seeks to offer at least some partial explanations for this alteration in terminology....
The Spirit of the Law in Newman's Apologia
In order to repudiate Kingsley's charge that he was a liar, Newman had to overcome what he called "the bias of the court" the common Protestant assumption that Catholicism itself was not only duplicitous, but also unpatriotic. Accordingly, Newman mounts...