Nineteenth-Century Prose

Articles from Vol. 19, No. 3, Fall

"Booked for Passage" on Cobbett's Rural Rides: Ecology as Revolution
William Cobbett (1762-1835) was variously a soldier, journalist, grammarian, agriculturalist, agitator, economist, ecologist, and finally, just prior to his death, an M.P. from Oldham in the first post-Reform Parliament. Unfortunately, there is no...
"Duty, Desire to Learn, and a Mission from the Times": Lord Curzon and His Travel Writings
George Nathaniel Curzon (1859-1925), later Lord Curzon of Kedleston, was elected to the, House of Commons in 1886 and was soon acknowledged as a coming man in the Conservative Party. He was admired for both his eloquence and skill in debate and for...
"F.C.G."
Any knowledgeable and successful Englishman at the end of the nineteenth century who read the weekly and daily press at his club or in the privacy of his home recognized the initials, "F.C.G." These three letters were all that Francis Carruthers Gould...
Historiography and Tory Restoration in Disraeli's Fiction
In The Rise of English Nationalism, Gerald Newman forges a link between that oldest of English political/ideological constructs, the "Norman Yoke," and the emergent movement of English nationalism in the eighteenth century. In Newman's redaction, the...
Politicians and Prose: An Introduction
The study of prose these days inclines toward authors who are commonly thought to have produced works of enduring value. If it is unnecessary to say that such an approach is useful to the present, it is rather more important to observe that frequently...
Radicalism and the Emerging Historical Profession in Victorian England: The Case of John Richard Green
There has been a renewed interest by scholars during the last decade in the historians of the Victorian era, focusing on two aspects of the history writing of that period: 1) the Victorians' obsession with tracing the origins and gradual evolution...
Small Marks and Instinctual Responses: A Study in the Uses of Gladstone's Marginalia
William Gladstone has in one respect been well served by scholars. Enticed by his prodigious achievements and encouraged by an enormous paper residue, they have produced an amount and quality of scholarship unparalleled in nineteenth-century political...
The Bitter Cry of Outcast London and the Practice of Late Victorian Politics
In his masterful study of The Rise and Fall of the Political Press in Britain, Stephen Koss investigated the partisan connections between Victorian politicians and journalists. According to Koss, the politicians used the press to promote their causes...