Nineteenth-Century Prose

Articles from Vol. 24, No. 1, Spring

Hegemony at Home: The Queen, the Press, and the Visual Rhetoric of Familial Love
This article examines the production of British political culture in an historically specific instance involving the Great Exhibition of 1851, civic performances by Queen Victoria and her family, and their graphic representation in the Illustrated...
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Introduction
Fifty years ago a special issue such as this one, devoted entirely to Victorian periodical literature, would not have been possible. The necessary references did not exist, nor was there enough general interest. In the interim, however, a new literary...
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New Bibliographic Controls for Victorian Periodicals
J. Don Vann and Rosemary T. VanArsdel, eds., Victorian Periodicals and Victorian Society (U of Toronto P, 1994, paper reprint 1995), 370 pp., $35 paper; and J. Don Vann and Rosemary T. VanArsdel, eds., Periodicals of Queen Victoria's Empire: An Exploration...
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"No Followers": The Victorian Servant Problem
The Victorian problem of uppity and unruly servants debated in middle-class periodicals and household manuals could not be solved because servants themselves were not the problem. The transgressive potential of servants, despite the claims of middle-class...
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Painting for Reputation: The Pre-Raphaelites, John Ruskin, and the Victorian Press
The Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood were severely criticized by reviewers for the minute surfaces of their paintings. While "finish" was an admired trait in genre painting in Victorian times, the PRB took realism to a level of almost migraine intensity....
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Periodical Literature in Nineteenth-Century America
Periodical Literature in Nineteenth-Century America, ed. Kenneth M. Price and Susan Belasco Smith (UP of Virginia, 1995), vi + 292 pp., $45.00 cloth, $17.50 paper. Nineteenth-century American periodical literature, the editors of this volume assert,...
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R. Howard Bloch, God's Plagiarist: Being an Account of the Fabulous Industry and Irregular Commerce of the Abbe Migne
R. Howard Bloch, God's Plagiarist: Being an Account of the Fabulous Industry and Irregular Commerce of the Abbe Migne (U of Chicago P, 1994), 152 pp., $2.4.95 cloth. R. Howard Bloch opens God's Plagiarist: Being an Account of the Fabulous Industry...
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"Securing the Suffrage of the Crowd": George Newnes and the Million
The Million, established in March 1892, was a popular penny weekly magazine published and edited by George Newnes. It featured light fiction, anecdotes, a young person's page, correspondence and editorial pages, and catered to the literate masses....
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"The Electric Constable": Telegraphic Language and the Capture of John Tawell, 1845-1854
When John Tawell left London one day in January 1845 to murder his mistress in the suburbs, he assumed that the new suburban railway system would facilitate his escape back into the city with an unbreakable alibi. But the new technology of the electric...
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Victorian Women Writers and the Periodical Press: The Case of Harriet Martineau
The convention of anonymity associated with most Victorian periodicals enabled Harriet Martineau (1802-1876) to resist socially constructed stereotypes of the "female author." When writing for the periodicals, Martineau molded her narrative voice to...
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Women Poets as Critics in the Athenaeum: Ungendered Anonymity Unmasked
This article explores the Athenaeum's editorial policy toward poets and reviewers of poetry. It explodes the myth that Theodore Watts-Dunton dominated the poetry section in the eighties and nineties by revealing the identities of four generations of...
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