Nineteenth-Century Prose

Articles from Vol. 18, No. 1, Winter

Editor's Note
On more than one occasion, regular readers of this journal have commented to one of the editors that our "Reviews" section is particularly valuable to them. Our policy of permitting reviewers to write 1000-2000 words on new scholarly publications allows...
Francis Newman and the Capacities of Women
Reviews in Victorian periodicals of the mid-1860s customarily were unsigned, though the Fortnightly Review, edited by George Henry Lewes, in 1865 pioneered a new style of signed articles. (1) The Westminster Review, however, still followed the old...
Gabriele Rossetti's Rigors of Rome: A Translation
Introduction Gabriele Rossetti (1785-1854), the father of Dante Gabriel and Christina Rossetti, remains a powerful background figure in the study of Victorian poetry. Although he is commonly alluded to as a "Neapolitan exile," he was actually born...
Swift and Arnold: An Unlikely Partnership?
The scurrilous satire of Jonathan Swirl's A Tale of a Tub and The Battle of the Books found a receptive audience in the keenest minds of the Victorian era. Although the popular image of the Victorians as smugly self-satisfied believers in eternal progress...
The Pre-Raphaelite "Pack of Satyrs" in John Fowles's the French Lieutenant's Woman
In the prologue to his 1986 book A Maggot, John Fowles announces, "What follows may seem like a historical novel; but it is not" (n. pag.). The book may not be based on historical events, but Fowles has gone to considerable lengths to make it "seem"...