Nineteenth-Century Prose

Articles from Vol. 31, No. 1, Spring

Burning, Burial, and the Critique of Stoicism in Pater's Marius the Epicurean
Critics have often described Marius' intellectual path towards Christianity in Walter Pater's 1885 novel Marius the Epicurean as a Hegelian progression, in which Stoicism and Epicureanism operate as thesis and antithesis, and Christianity is the synthesis....
From the Editor
The current Spring 2004 issue of Nineteenth-Century Prose covers a broad spectrum of the journal's field, from the very beginning of the nineteenth century with Mary A. Water's essay on Letitia Barbauld's literary criticism in Britain, to Clay Morley's...
Hazlitt's "Essayism"
Hazlitt's place in the Romantic canon spans the range from impressionist to critic. This essay examines Hazlitt's "essayism," the totality of impressionistic/critical response constituting his practice as an essayist, and argues that his writings reflect...
"Ordered South": The Spatial Sense of the Invalid in Robert Louis Stevenson's Early Travel Essay
In his essay, "Crabbed Age and Youth," Robert Louis Stevenson poses the question, "What if there were no centre at all ... and the whole world a labyrinth without end or issue?" and then offers an answer: "There is no centre to the maze because ......
"Slovenly Monthly Catalogues": The Monthly Review and Barbauld's Periodical Literary Criticism
Anna Letitia Barbauld, one of the eighteenth century's most highly-regarded women poets, was also the early nineteenth century's most important British woman literary critic. She not only published a large body of essay criticism, but authored hundreds...
The "Curious" Pagan Spirit of Pater's the Renaissance
This essay illustrates that the reciprocal function of curiosity and a pagan sensibility constitutes the dominant, consistent argument of Pater's work. Through an etymological account of the word "curious" and an analysis of Pater's aesthetic principles,...
"The Flesh-Tints of Rubens": Henry James' Contribution to the Construction of Englishness
This essay analyzes Henry James" comments on Belgium, Flanders, and Flemish art in the context of nineteenth-century English literature, imperialism, and the construction of an English identity. The Low Countries have always occupied a special place...
The Macaulay Nobody Reads: Second Thoughts and "Warren Hastings"
Differences between Macaulay's writings on Indian education, the compatible 1840 essay "Lord Clive," and the less sanguine 1841 essay "Warren Hastings" have been overlooked. Macaulay's evaluation of Hastings' Indian career and the English national...
Thoreau's Taste for the Wild in Cape Cod
In Cape Cod, Thoreau presents his journey to a stark and undomesticated New England setting that in his day offered bleak and foreign views far different from the homelike familiarity that his sojourn to Walden Pond afforded. Because many interpret...
Turn-of-the-Century Perceptions of Manliness and Religion: Frederic's Jeremiad in Theron Ware
This essay examines the intersection of religious faith and conceptions of manhood in turn-of-the-century American culture--a cultural moment during which many American men investigated the limits of manhood, scrutinizing its qualities and evaluating...