Journal of Caribbean Literatures

Articles from Vol. 6, No. 2, Fall

Cognition and Sociocultural Situatedness: Cross-Culture-Specific Caribbean Self-Celebration of Imagination in Jose Lezama Lima and Wilson Harris
... we are hunted, we are pursued by repetitive catastrophes, repetitive Nemesis, and our insight into Beauty--which we may gain at the heart of terror--deepens the trial of creation to bridge chasms in itself ... or else we will continue to perpetuate...
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Copia and the Discourse of Abundance in Cross-Cultural Exchange
Representing a formative moment in the history of travel writing, the journals of Christopher Columbus initiate discussions of the discursive currents and rhetorical strategies used in cross-cultural exchanges. Columbus's writings and subsequent New...
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Cultural Foregrounding and Translating: Julia Alvarez's "Yo" in Spanish
Introduction One of the main characteristics of Caribbean literature is the fact that it is written in the different languages of four hegemonic cultures. By virtue of colonization and cultural domination, we find--as in other areas of the globe--peripheral...
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Introduction
The present issue is a vortex in the research on Spanish Caribbean Literatures. My aim has not only been to describe what the Caribbean literatures in Spanish have been and are but also to project some new ways to understand and study this topic from...
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Leopold Sedar Senghor and Nicolas Guillen: Two Poets of Hybridization
In the last few decades, Negrismo and Negritude have become increasingly important to researchers who are attempting to understand and better define Afro-Hispanic, Afro-Caribbean, and black Francophone writing. Both movements have been researched separately...
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Letter from the Editor
This journal issue has been several years in the making, and it introduces topics that the JCLs has long been addressing. Much of the discussion has to do in part with definitions, i.e., what is Spanish Caribbean; how do we define it; how do we write...
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Narrating from the Ruins: Cubagua and la Galera De Tiberio by Enrique Bernardo Nunez
Only ruins mark the passing of all the different dominations. (Nunez, Cubagua 58) This is how one pictures the angel of history. His face is turned toward the past. Where we perceive a chain of events, he sees one single catastrophe which keeps...
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Political Authority Figures as Distant Memories of a Forgotten Past: Julia Alvarez's in the Time of the Butterflies and in the Name of Salome and Cristina Garcia's the Aguero Sisters
At the end of one century and the beginning of another, Caribbean women are writing about their experiences--about the distant and ever-present past--while using the mainstream language of the often-hostile host country where they now reside. They...
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Self-Actualization Is Paradise in la Nada Cotidiana by Zoe Valdes
An acknowledgment of Western civilization's proclivity for understanding the world in dualistic and hierarchical terms has prompted such critics as Helene Cixous to question how this worldview has affected the West's culture and art. Who can overlook...
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Spanish Caribbean Literature: A Linguist's View
Introduction Area Studies is certainly a growing field of research in the humanities. The old, all-encompassing approaches seem to be vanishing from the academic stage. They are not at all disappearing from the international scene, though, as this...
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What Is Spanish Caribbeanness? A Cognitive Approach
How Can Geography Activate Our Mind? From the discipline of geography, we learn that the term "Caribbean" is a collective name designating an area which includes the Caribbean Sea, the group of surrounding islands, and their adjoining coasts. The...
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