Journal of Caribbean Literatures

Articles from Vol. 5, No. 1, Summer

Anansi as Classical Hero
Although the introduction of the term multi-cultural canon might give rise to all sorts of musings on the dynamics of cultural elements in literature, it is nevertheless clear that, in this particular setting, its aim is just to help us form a notion...
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Ideology and Writing in Papiamentu: A Bird's Eye View (1)
Hundreds of miles of Caribbean Sea separate the Dutch Windward islands (Bovenwindse eilanden)--Saba, St. Maarten, and St. Eustatius--and the Dutch Leeward islands (Beneden-windse eilanden)--Aruba, Bonaire, and Curacao. Together they form the remnants...
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In a Recovery of Identity through Papiamentu: The Talents of Elis Juliana
Translation has a seemingly natural relation to migration in the sense that it transports words, ideas, and the expressions of life in an immediate awareness of other language, cultures, and societies. In the Caribbean Sea lie Aruba, Bonaire, and Curacao,...
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Introduction
Once a neglected corner of the map of postcolonial studies, the literature of the Dutch Caribbean (in this issue also called the Netherlands Antilles and Aruba, or the ABC Islands) is becoming of increasing interest to scholars in the U.S. and Europe....
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Letter from the Editor
I am pleased to provide our readership with this important and breakthrough issue of the Dutch Caribbean, an issue which focuses on the native language of islands known as the Netherlands Antilles: Aruba, Bonaire, and Curacao, (the ABC Islands). Papiamentu,...
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Papiamentu, Cultural Resistance, and Socio-Cultural Challenges: The ABC Islands in a Nutshell
Introduction Since November 25, 1975, when Suriname became independent from the Dutch Kingdom, the tropical remains of the Netherlands (1) comprise six Caribbean islands. They are divided into the Leeward Dutch Antilles (Aruba, Bonaire, Curacao;...
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Slavery and the Development of Papiamentu
The creole language of Papiamentu enjoys a distinguished status among the creoles of the world. The native language of some 250,000 people on the southern Caribbean islands of Curacao, Aruba, and Bonaire (and their diaspora--largely in the Netherlands),...
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The Portuguese Language on Curacao and Its Role in the Formation of Papiamentu
Curacao, the largest island of the Netherlands Antilles, is home to a multilingual community. To varying degrees, many of its inhabitants have command of four languages: Papiamentu, the vernacular; Dutch, the official; and Spanish and English, the...
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