ARIEL

Articles from Vol. 35, No. 1-2, January-April

Becoming-Animal and Pure Life in Coetzee's Disgrace
Gilles Deleuze is rightly regarded as a vitalist thinker in the sense that a concept of impersonal life is central to his philosophy. (1) The ontology of events in The Logic of Sense, the ontology of pure transcendental ideas in Difference and Repetition...
"Essentially Contested": Law, Literature, Postcoloniality
There are no easy conventions for the creation of meaning. Robert Cover, "Nomos and Narrative" (25) In writing this introduction to "Law, Literature, Postcoloniality" I borrow the term "essentially contested" from W.B. Gallie's Philosophy and...
From Colonialism to Multiculturalism? Totem Poles, Tourism and National Identity in Vancouver's Stanley Park
The totem is an indication of an old and wide culture. It points to the past. (Goodfellow 15) The Stanley Park totem poles are a bona fide photo opportunity. (Grant and Dickson 48) Tourism and culture now plainly overlap and there is no clear...
"From Many Peoples, Strength": Towards a Postcolonial Law and Literature (1)
There is no human being who is not the product of every social experience, every process of education ... Indeed, even if it were possible, a judge free of this heritage of past experience would probably lack the very qualities of humanity required...
Juris-Fiction: Literature and the Law of the Law
The poem is the cry of its occasion, Part of the rest itself and not about it. Wallace Stevens, "An Ordinary Evening in New Haven" Lauding editors on these occasions is rightly suspect, but here it is simply unavoidable. Gary Boire's pathbreaking,...
Michael Ondaatje's Anil's Ghost and the Aestheticization of Human Rights
Violence draws on people's capacity to serve a cause greater than themselves, to sacrifice for the common good, to put their individual welfare at the service of the nation and the people. And these are the noblest parts of the human soul. When...
Notes from the Editor
During the summer of 2001 an exhibition of art, Museopathy, held at different sites in Kingston, Ontario, explored the interaction between the global gestures of contemporary art and specific local sites. One of the most striking pieces in the exhibition...
Power Politics and International Public Law: Lessons from Benito Cereno
Silent leges inter arma. During war, the laws are silent. Marcus Tullius Cicero, ProMilone 11 I. Introduction Alone on the high seas, on the verge of the 19th century, the Spanish galleon San Dominick, captained by Benito Cereno, is engulfed...
Sovereignty and the Cinematic Image: Gary Snyder, the Civil Rights Act of 1968, and the Witnessing of Jurisdiction
Categorizing the purpose and methodology of the interdisciplinary sub-field of "law and literature" with any consistency is a thorny venture. From Jane Baron's early work on the topic, naming humanism, hermeneutics, and narrative, as the three strands...
Symbolic Violence: Law, Literature, Interpretation-An Afterword
In many ways law is colonialism's first language. The language of law, or more specifically, the performative aspects of legal discourse, provided the first European explorers with a dramatic medium by which they might familiarize the unfamiliar, a...
Undignified Details: The Colonial Subject of Law
A legal world is built only to the extent that there are commitments that place bodies on the line ... the interpretive commitments of officials are realized, indeed, in the flesh. Robert Cover "Violence and the Word" (208) At the end of Chinua...
"What Is an Indian?": Identity Politics in United States Federal Indian Law and American Indian Literatures*
The emergence of the idea of race as a scientific category in the first half of the nineteenth century in the United States was simultaneous with the emergence of biology as a category of knowledge and scientific racism as a mode of justifying both...