ARIEL

Articles from Vol. 42, No. 3-4, July-October

Asian Transnational Adoption: Subject and Trauma in Life Narratives of Korean Adoptees and Gish Jen's the Love Wife
Across disciplines, from literature, anthropology; and psychology, to law, politics, and social work, there is a rapidly growing body of scholarship on adoption. With the expansion of the global economy, transnational/-racial adoption, in particular,...
Between Worlds: Imagining Dyaspora in Danticat's the Dew Breaker and Chancy's the Spirit of Haiti
When you are in Haiti they call you Dyaspora. This word, which connotes both connection and disconnection, accurately describes your condition as a Haitian American[, d]isconnected from the physical landscape of the homeland. ... You get so you...
Editor's Notes
Among the last words Michel Foucault wrote is the remark that "the truth is never the same; there can be truth only in the form of the other world and the other life" (356). In Foucault's view, the truth of the world never remains fixed or self-identical;...
Family History, Food, and Marketing Ethnicity in Helen Tse's Sweet Mandarin
Over the last two decades, family memoirs, auto/biographical narratives of at least three generations of a family, have mapped the histories of diasporic Asian groups in the West. Jung Chang's bestselling Wild Swans: Three Daughters of China (1991),...
Imperial Fantasies: Mourning the Loss of Empire in the Novels of Penelope Lively and Ruth Prawer Jhabvala
Will the British Empire ever be over, or are we destined to witness its eternal return in the form of [literary] nostalgia masquerading as history? (Burton, "India, Inc.?" 217) We need to be rigorously critical of the histories of feminism--those...
Neo-Slave Narratives in Contemporary Black British Fiction
In The Afro-American Novel and Its Tradition (1987), Bernard Bell created the term "neoslave narratives" to refer to the fictions about slavery that began to appear in the US in the sixties and seventies and he defined them as "residually oral, modern...
"Nothing, Not a Scrap or Identity": Janet Frame's Vision of Self and Knowledge in A State of Siege
Centring on a lone woman whose "quest for creative revelation [results in] death" (Mercer 108), A State of Siege (1966) has so far proven obdurately resistant to any attempts at attenuating its bleakness. The prevailing critical consensus concerning...
On Stage with D'bi.young Anitafrika and Word! Sound! Powah!
d'bi.young anitafrika, award-winning Canadian playwright, actor, and dub poet, recently returned to the stage with new work, word!sound!powah! the final installment in her Sankofa trilogy, debuted at Toronto's Theatre Passe Muraille's mainspace from...
"People Set Apart": Representations of Jewishness in the Fiction of Salman Rushdie
Just as Salman Rushdie returns repeatedly to Kashmir in his fictions, he also has an ongoing fascination with Jewish characters. In Shame (1983), anti-Semitism serves as an index of Pakistan's commitment to purity, and thus underlines its difference...
Poster Children: Laurens Van der Post's Imperial Propaganda in A Far off Place
The use of children to both promote and deconstruct the institution of Empire is not new. Rudyard Kipling's troubled hero in Kim upholds the basic tenets of Empire while also critiquing their efficacy. Kim's eventual breakdown at the end of the novel...
Race, Ethnicity and Nuclear War: Representations of Nuclear Weapons and Post-Apocalyptic Worlds
Paul Williams. Race, Ethnicity and Nuclear War: Representations of Nuclear Weapons and Post-Apocalyptic Worlds. Liverpool: Liverpool U Press, 2011. 278 pp. $95.00 USD. In Race, Ethnicity and Nuclear War, Paul Williams turns to an eclectic list of...
Reconcile, Reconciled: A New Reading of Reconciliation in J.M. Coetzee's Disgrace
It happens every day, every hour, every minute, he tells himself, in every quarter of the country. Count yourself lucky to have escaped with your life. Count yourself lucky not to be a prisoner in the car at this moment, speeding away, or at...
Textual Territory and Narrative Power in Junot Diaz's the Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao
I. In numerous discussions of The Brief Wondrous Lift of Oscar Wao conducted during interviews and public appearances, Junot Diaz has repeatedly suggested and even stated outright that readers should consider the relationship between authority exercised...
The Conflagration of Community: Fiction before and after Auschwitz
J. Hillis Miller. The Conflagration of Community: Fiction before and after Auschwitz. Chicago: U of Chicago Press, 2011. 329 pp. $29.00 USD. According to J. Hillis Miller, The Conflagration of Community: Action before and after Auschwitz "constructs...
The Poetics of Postcolonial Atrocity: Dalit Life Writing, Testimonio, and Human Rights
If, as Michael Ignatieff proposes, human rights is the lingua franca to articulate and address the problems of suffering (7), then it follows that particular forms of suffering might generate specific forms of narrative within this language of rights....
The Politics of Postcolonialism: Empire, Nation and Resistance
Rumina Sethi. The Politics of Postcolonialism: Empire, Nation and Resistance. London: Pluto, 2011. 190 pp. [pounds sterling]16.00. World War II was a watershed. Before, European colonial states in Africa, Asia, and the Caribbean; after, anti-colonial...
"The Sea Is History": Opium, Colonialism, and Migration in Amitav Ghosh's Sea of Poppies
A light-skinned African American freedman passing for white, an Indian female farmer who has been rescued from sati (widow immolation), a French woman disguised as an Indian labourer, a British opium merchant, a half-Parsi and half-Chinese convict--these...
The Thousand Faces of Night: A Counter-Narrative of Bleeding Womanhood
I We can find in most arguments on menstruation reference to defilement. (1) In Daughters of Independence: Gender, Caste and Class in India, for example, Joanna Liddle and Rama Joshi argue that there is a link between women's subordination and the...
Tightrope Walker Vision: Something of Language, Home, and History in David Malouf's Remembering Babylon
The title of David Malouf's novel, Remembering Babylon, suggests issues such as memory, place, and exile as well as the polarization of two spaces: Babylon as a space of exile and Jerusalem as a "lost" or Promised land. The epigraph by Blake that Malouf...
Time without Partitions: Midnight's Children and Temporal Orientalism
When Mogor dell'Amore returns from the Mundus Novus of the Americas to the court of the Mughal Emperor Akbar in Salman Rushdie's The Enchantress of Florence, he brings with him fabulous tales of the "erratic nature of time in that half-uncharted territory."...
Unofficial Collections: Organic/artifactual Documents and the (Re)inscription of the Civic Archive in Michael Ondaatje's in the Skin of a Lion
I. Finding Aid As a reader preoccupied with the documentary tradition in Canadian letters, I have spent my fair share of time rooting around archival institutions across the country. My doctoral research into the documentary underpinnings of Robert...
Visions of an Incurable Rationalist: Leonard Woolf's Stories of the East
Leonard Woolf opened Imperialism and Civilization (1928), his "most thorough and lengthy anti-imperialist statement" (Edmonds and Luedeking 37), with the epigraph "men moralize among ruins." The ironic distance this quotation cast over his political...
Wilderness into Civilized Shapes: Reading the Postcolonial Environment
Laura Wright. Wilderness into Civilized Shapes: Reading the Postcolonial Environment. Athens, GA: U of Georgia Press, 2010. 220 pp. $24.95 USD. In Wilderness into Civilized Shapes: Reading the Postcolonial Environment, Laura Wright examines issues...