Pushkin Review

Articles

Vol. 15, Annual

Traveling Domestics: The Penates and the Poet in Pushkin's Lyric Verse
[TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII.] --A. S. Pushkin (1) There are a number of references to the Classical figures of the ancient Roman household gods, the Penates, throughout Pushkin's poetic oeuvre. Often paired with the Lares, the Penates hold...
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Griboedovedenie: An Introduction
In his Crimean travel notes of 25 June 1825, Alexander Griboedov describes an animated, magical landscape where he and his fellow travelers are mere observers: A pink stripe across gloomy clouds, the play of the evening sun; a pike shows blue...
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Griboedov's Project of the Russian Transcaucasian Company and the Ideas of the European Enlightenment
God! How come it did not strike him before: Transcaucasia, you know, is a colony! (1) --Yuri Tynianov The project of the Russian Transcaucasian Company was written in 1828 in Tiflis by Alexander Griboedov, who at the time served as Russian minister...
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Anticipating Chekhov: Tragicomic Elements in Griboedov's Woe from Wit
[Woe from Wit] is considered a comedy. A number of scenes in it completely justify that style. But in this great play there is much of the author's bitter grief for his country and his people ... The great Russian classic dramatists showed their deep...
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Griboedov in Bed: Meyerhold's Woe to Wit and the Staging of Sexual Mores in the NEP Era
Following the success of his modern adaptation of Nikolai Gogol's The Inspector General (1925), Vsevolod Meyerhold turned his attention to Alexander Griboedov's play in verse, Woe from Wit (Gore ot uma; 1823). Like The Inspector General, Griboedov's...
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Andrew Kahn, Ed.: The Cambridge Companion to Pushkin
Andrew Kahn, ed. The Cambridge Companion to Pushkin. Introduction by Andrew Kahn. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2006. xv + 238. Illustrations. Chronology. Map. Appendix. Index. ISBN-0-521-60471-0. Paper. This review of Andrew Kahn's Cambridge...
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Stephanie De Montalk. the Fountain of Tears
Stephanie de Montalk. The Fountain of Tears. Wellington, New Zealand: Victoria University Press, Victoria University of Wellington, 2006. 240 pp. ISBN 0-86473-531-6. The Fountain of Tears is a high-quality work of intellectual fiction, a novel about...
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Vol. 14, Annual

Alexander Pushkin's Novel in Verse, Eugene Onegin, and Its Legacy in the Work of Vladimir Nabokov
Alexander Pushkin's novel in verse Eugene Onegin (1833) overcame thresholds imposed by the conventions of genre and style to become a threshold text itself over the course of its canonization; marked by innovation and a sharp break with tradition,...
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"Portable Graveyards": Albums in the Romantic Culture of Memory
In his 1820 tongue-in-cheek article in the journal Blagonamerennyi (The Benevolent One), a certain "N. Virsheeskii" complains about the then fashionable "invention" of albums and their detrimental effect on literary culture: "Now all new poems and...
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"The Sun of World Poetry": Pushkin as a Cold War Writer
The Spell of the Spectacle: The Pushkin Celebrations of 1949 The festivities dedicated to the 150th anniversary of Pushkin's birth, lasting from mid-April through early July 1949, were the second-greatest mass spectacle of the early Cold War after...
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"With No Great Quantity of Paintings": Pushkin's Polemic with Raphael in "Madona"
One of only three sonnets Pushkin wrote in his lifetime, "Madona" (1830) is a monument to the union of a poet's life and work. (1) Due in large part to the circumstances of Pushkin's death, reception of the sonnet has focused less on the poem itself...
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"She Troubles Me like a Passion": Shakespearean Echoes in Pushkin's Marina Mniszek
In the extensive body of scholarship concerning Shakespeare's influence on Pushkin, (1) more studies have examined Pushkin's employment of particular motifs than his depiction of characters, which is especially strange given the poet's stated admiration...
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Pushkin's "To Ovid" and Virgil's Georgics
The critical ambition to use reception as a means by which to gain new insight cannot invariably be fulfilled, yet it is ever the exceptional cases that prove the matter. I wish to examine what appears to be an extraordinarily pointed allusion to Virgil's...
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Alexander Pushkin. Tales of Belkin
Alexander Pushkin. Tales of Belkin. Translated by Josh Billings. Brooklyn, NY: Melville House, 2009. 128. ISBN-13: 978-1-933633-73-2. Paper. Alexander Pushkin. The Tales of Belkin. Foreword by Adam Thirlwell. Translated by Hugh Aplin. London: Hesperus...
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Dreamlore Games. A. S. Pushkin, "Evgenii Oniegin," Igra Dlia Personal'nago Komp'iutera
Dreamlore Games. A. S. Pushkin, "Evgenii Oniegin," Igra dlia personal'nago komp'iutera. Moscow: Akella, 2009. <http://www.dreamloregames.com/onegin/> Dreamlore's "Evgenii Oniegin" (title in the old orthography) is not so much a computer game...
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Vol. 12-13, Annual

The Queen of Spades: A Seriously Intended Joke
It is a commonplace to begin any discussion of The Queen of Spades by remarking on the richness of the secondary literature. Analyses of the tale can for the most part be placed in two categories. For many scholars, the problem is to unravel the mystery...
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The Poet and His Readers: Three Lyrics and an Unfinished Story of Alexander Pushkin
Now and then, in the course of events, when the flow of time turns into a muddy torrent and history floods our cellars, earnest people are apt to examine the interrelation between a writer and the national or universal community; and writers themselves...
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Between Thought and Feeling: Odoevsky, Pushkin, and Dialectical Doubt in 1833
In the commentary to the Literary Monuments edition of Vladimir Odoevsky's Motely Tales, Marietta Tur'ian remarks upon a peculiar moment of intertextual resonance in the final tale of the 1833 collection. In "The Same Tale, Only Inside Out"--the companion...
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Exploring the Dual Heritage of Russia's Greatest Poet, Father of Modern Russian Literature and the Black Russians of the Twentieth Century (Cambridge, April 2008)
April 2008 brought together scholars, researchers, teachers, artists, departmental executives, media professionals, students, residents, visitors, and Harvard alumni from numerous disciplines both within and without the academy, and within and beyond...
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Arthur Vincent Lourie's Opera on Pushkin's Black Great-Grandfather
The four texts below were delivered orally and in tandem at the interdisciplinary conference "Alexander Pushkin: An Historic Symposium at Harvard, Exploring the Dual Heritage of Russia's Greatest Poet, Father of Modern Russian Literature and the Black...
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Pushkin as a Poet of Blackness
The title of this paper, "Pushkin as a Poet of Blackness," shades into another title, "Pushkin as a Black Poet." I am taking as my starting point a question one of my colleagues, Irina Reyfman, posed when my co-editors and I were first beginning the...
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Pushkin's Aestheticized Defense of His African Heritage in His Poem "My Genealogy"
I treasure the past in my home, I secretly conjure up the past. --Anna Akhmatova, "They came and said ..." (1) This study concentrates on Pushkin's masterpiece of rebuttal "My Genealogy" ("Moia rodoslovnaia"), crafted in defense of his Pushkin...
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My Genealogy
5 [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] My Genealogy Laughing cruelly at their colleague, This crowd of Russian hacks Calls me an aristocrat: Just look, if you will, at this nonsense! I'm no officer, no assessor, ...
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Excerpts from Variegated Tales by Prince Vladimir Fyodorovich Odoevsky
Translator's Preface In general, the American reader's knowledge of Russian literary classics is limited primarily by the availability of English language translations. Extant translations have also largely defined the foreign audience's preferences...
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Pushkin and the Wikipedia: <Http://en.Wikipedia.org/wiki/Pushkin>
Wikipedia has become a common resource not only for students shirking the rigors of genuine research, but also for scholars seeking a quick and reliable answer to a basic question. In that capacity it has been extremely useful and time-saving to us...
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Vol. 11, Annual

Who Was the Author of the First Book (or Rather Booklet) on Pushkin?
Introduction The publication of Pushkin's Boris Godunov gave rise to a heated polemic in the criticism of the time. In May 1831 one of the first negative responses to the tragedy--and an especially severe one--appeared in the form of an anonymous...
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Tragedy and Ethical Evaluation in Pushkin's Poltava
Alexander Pushkin's Poltava concludes with a paean to the subtle traces of human lives a century after their ends. All that "goes on four feet, two feet and three feet ... and is most feeble when it walks on four" passes to dust, thereafter existing...
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The Mystery of Germann's Failure in the Queen of Spades: Cracking Pushkin's Personal Code
"My 'Queen of Spades' is in great vogue," wrote Pushkin in his diary in April 1834. For almost two centuries the story has been celebrated by readers, with this difference: in Pushkin's time it stirred the blood of card players, whereas nowadays it...
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Reading Pushkin's Tales of Belkin through Sainte-Beuve's Vie, Poesies et Pensees De Joseph Delorme
It has been widely assumed that Alexander Pushkin's Tales of the Late Ivan Petrovich Belkin (1831) were inspired by the oeuvre of Sir Walter Scott, and most notably by Scott's Tales of my Landlord, Collected and Arranged by Jedediah Cleishbotham (1816-19)...
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Russian Cleopatrimony: Pushkin's Egyptian Nights in the Silver Age
The cultural myth of Cleopatra was central to the aesthetic sensibility of the Russian Silver Age. Few attempts, however, have been made to unfold the intricate workings of the image of Cleopatra as a fatal lover--an image that proved extremely influential...
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A Tribute to Paul Debreczeny (1932-2008)
Paul Debreczeny will always be remembered with love and gratitude by those who were fortunate enough to have met him and worked with him. His importance as not only a scholar and teacher, but also as ah extraordinary human being, is testified to in...
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Conference Proceedings: "Alexander Pushkin and Russian National Identity: Taboo Texts, Topics, Interpretations," University of Notre Dame, 9-11 January 2009
Program available at: http://germanandrussian.nd.edu/russian/taboopushkin/ Alyssa Gillespie (University of Notre Dame) and Katya Hokanson (University of Oregon), the editors of a forthcoming volume on Pushkin and taboo, convened this conference...
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Pushkin and Blackness on the Web
The subject of Pushkin and his "blackness" is one that continues to attract American students of Russian. For this reason, Pushkin Review has attempted to assess the resource most likely to be the one our undergraduates first consult upon investigating...
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Vol. 10, Annual

Princeton's Boris Godunov, 1936/2007
On April 12, 2007, after half-a-year of intense collaboration between Music, Slavic, Theater and Dance, and the School of Architecture, the Berlind Theater at Princeton University "premiered a concept." The communications and publicity staff of the...
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First Encounters of an Outsider with Boris: Tim Vasen, Director
In the winter of 2006 Simon Morrison offered me a unique directing opportunity, perhaps the most interesting and challenging I've yet faced. The task at hand: to create a production of one of Russia's best-known plays, almost completely unknown in...
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The Actors on Their Biggest Anxieties, Best Moments, and Steepest Learning Curves: Testimonials from the Company
As Tim Vasen confessed, the "task at hand" was intimidating, a challenge of more than extra-curricular proportions. To increase the chances of its success, Princeton sponsored seven academic courses in connection with the BG project. In Fall 2006,...
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Tragedy or Comedy? Boris the Visuals and Musico-Visuals: Juliet Forshaw and Stacy Dubov
In the Boris-related courses offered through the Slavic Department, one obstacle to visualizing the Meyerhold production was the paucity of designed sets and fully blocked scenes. We knew how the production was supposed to sound, and at which points...
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Afterword: The Fate of the Jubilee Pushkin on the Stalinist Musical-Dramatic Stage
Early in the Boris Godunov seminar, Leeore Schnairsohn (a second-year graduate student in Comparative Literature) commented in one of his critiques on the openness or "eternal present" implied in Pushkin's famous final stage direction, narod bezmolvstvuet....
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Pushkin's Novel the Captain's Daughter as Fictional Family Memoir
Dedicated to J. Thomas Shaw with gratitude for his scholarship and generosity of spirit More often than not at the beginning of the nineteenth century the genre signal "zapiski" was used as the Russian equivalent of the French term "memoires," that...
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Lucid Sorrow and Political Foresight: Simon Frank on Pushkin, and the Challenges of Ontology for Literature
So abounding in its living variety is the wondrous spiritual reality that in this world bore the name of Alexander Pushkin. --Simon Frank, "Lucid Sorrow" (1) Poetry and Philosophy: The Preamble Written less than a year before his death in...
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"Light Breathing": Osip Mandel'shtam's "First" Poems, Pushkin, and the Poetics of Influence
After 1837, blood and poetry both rang differently in the ears. --Osip Mandel'shtam, The Noise of Time How (even with all hindsight) can we know the true ephebe, the potentially strong poet, from the mass of ocean's nurslings around him? By hearing...
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Another Look at the Poetics of Exile: Pushkin's Reception of Ovid, 1821-24
In 8 A.D., Publius Ovidius Naso was relegated to the far corner of the Roman Empire to a small city on the Black Sea, where he spent the last ten years of his life. Some 1800 years later, twenty-one-year-old Alexander Pushkin followed him there, again...
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"Mniszek's Sonnet": In Honor of J. Thomas Shaw, Pushkinist Extraordinaire
In recognition of Professor Shaw's lifetime work and numerous contributions to the field of Pushkin studies in North America, we are including two special sections to the journal for this issue. Part 1: (1) Contest for the best rhymed translation...
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Remembering Tom Shaw as Teacher, Scholar, Mentor
David M. Bethea The thing I remember most about Tom Shaw over the years is his generosity, his willingness to do the "heavy lifting" without commenting on it. Perhaps it has something to do with coming from a modest background, going through the...
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Editing Pushkin: A Seminar Held at Oxford University, UK, July 2007
In 2006 the first volume appeared of a projected new collection of Pushkin's works: Pushkin: Poemy i povesti. Chast' I. Moscow: Novoe izdatel'stvo, 2006. Commentary by Oleg Proskurin. The complete edition is entitled Pushkin. Sochineniia. Kommentirovannoe...
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Vol. 8-9, Annual

Alexander Pushkin and the Irony of Temporality
Pushkin's 1825 lyric poem "K***" ("Ia pomniu chudnoe mgnoven'e ...") has been understood almost universally as a poem of recuperation, where creativity and vitality triumph over a temporal existence that threatens both. 1 On such a reading, the poem's...
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The Influence of Barry Cornwall and the Phenomenon of Polygenesis in Alexander Pushkin's "Little House in Kolomna"
Most writers steal a good thing when they can, And 't is safely got't is worth the winning. The worst of 't is we now and then detect'em, Before they ever dream that we suspect'em. (1) Pushkin and Cornwall: The Nature of Scholarly Work...
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Pushkin's Shifting Poetics: Deceptive Subtexts in "Domik V Kolomne"
"Domik v Kolomne" (known hereafter as "Domik"), Pushkin's narrative poem of 1833, is connected with the shift in the poet's poetics from his early period to the post-1830s. In his article "Put" Pushkina k proze," Boris Eikhenbaum describes some features...
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"Barbarus Hic Ego Sum": Pushkin and Ovid on the Pontic Shore
The dilemma of the literary exile is the writer's awareness of the need both to point out his distance from home and yet also continue a literary presence there. How does Pushkin's attempt to make readers aware of his absence and yet create a powerful...
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Once More about Arkadii Rodzianko and Pushkin
A noted poet of the late Alexandrine period, Arkadii Gavrilovich Rodzianko (1793-1846) is remembered in literary history primarily for his association and poetic dialogue with Pushkin. Rodzianko addressed at least one poem to Pushkin ("A. S. Pushkinu")...
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Language, Gender, and the Dream in Evgenii Onegin
Tat'iana's dream in Evgenii Onegin is an enigma. Occupying a central place in Pushkin's novel in verse, it shares the role of novelistic artifact with the protagonists' letters and its folk song. Dreams, in particular, hold sway as indicators of special...
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The Germann-Chekalinsky Duel in the Queen of Spades
Chekalinsky is the ever-smiling sixty-year-old banker in the gambling salon where Germann (2) met his final catastrophe in The Queen of Spades. He has received little attention in the literature on gambling and The Queen of Spades. In this paper I...
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Vol. 6-7, Annual

Pushkin's Vision of the Enlightened Self: Individualism, Authority and Tradition beyond Karamzin *
In the Memoirs of Princess Dashkova we find a curious account of one of the Princess' conversations with Diderot concerning the socio-political conditions and the prospects of the Enlightenment in Russia. In response to Dashkova's praise of the Russian...
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Cain and Herostratus: Pushkin's and Shaffer's Reappropriations of the Mozart Myth
Where the event of a great action is left doubtful, there the Poet is left Master. Dryden, preface to Don Sebastian The rumors surrounding the role of Antonio Salieri in the death of Mozart have transformed these artists into the subjects of...
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Sidestepping Silence, Ventriloquizing Death: A Reconsideration of Pushkin's Stone Island Cycle *
Writing poetry ... is an exercise in dying ... Art is not a better, but an alternative existence ... It is a spirit seeking flesh but finding words. --Joseph Brodsky, Less Than One During the summer of 1836, beset by financial worries and political...
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Vladislav Khodasevich as Teacher of Pushkin: Lectures on Poetry to the Proletkult
Proletkult, poetry, and Pushkin. Quite a combination, if you think about it. Add the poet Vladislav Khodasevich (1886-1939) into the mix, and the likelihood of pedagogical success seems slim, at best. The publication of a number of documents from...
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Khodasevich. Lectures on Pushkin for Proletkult (1918) (1)
First Lecture, Fundamental Techniques for Reading Pushkin Consciously (2) I 1. I have already written about the necessity of education for proletarian poets. (3) There is no need to repeat my conclusions: your presence here demonstrates that...
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The Little House at Kolomna by Alexander Pushkin
Introduction Pushkin published too late for his reputation to reach Byron. He appears in neither of John Bowring's anthologies of Russian poetry, at least one of which Byron knew: (1) if Byron had read a Bowring-ized version of The Fountain of Bakhchisarai,...
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On Translating Alexander Pushkin's Angelo
All translations presume a reader, and mine has been monolingual and affective, one who is both familiar with the tradition of versification in English and is willing to be trained to a new approach. Translating Angelo has therefore been an endeavor...
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A Note on Teaching Eugene Onegin in English
The Pushkin course introduced at the University of Oregon twenty years ago is designed to accommodate students with or without Russian. Without close reading and discussion of texts, a Pushkin course would lose much of its value. Our compromise has...
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On Teaching Eugene Onegin in English
It is a truth universally acknowledged among teachers of Russian literature in translation that (1) a nineteenth-century Russian literature survey must include Eugene Onegin and (2) this text--in its formal intricacy, metaliterary obsessions and historical...
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Champagne for the Brain: Reading and Writing Onegin Stanzas with American Undergraduates (1)
Eugene Onegin--like champagne Its effervescence stirs my brain. (Vikram Seth, A Golden Gate, 1986) "Poetry as we know it is dying." Thus David Bethea opens his 1998 book on Alexander Pushkin (3); similar laments on undergraduates' "bewilderment"...
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Pushkinian Elements in Isaak Levitan's Painting "By the Mill-Pond"
In December 1884, when Isaak Levitan was twenty-four and still had difficulties earning a living as a painter, his former teacher Vasilii Polenov arranged for him and a number of other young artists to work as designers for a private opera house established...
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