Thomas Wolfe Review

Articles from Vol. 31, Annual

Adrift in the "Life Sargassic": The Case of Look Homeward, Angel
Each Morn a thousand Roses brings, you say; Yes, but where leaves the Rose of Yesterday? --Edward FitzGerald (1) I. Rural Textures It happened in 2006 that the Southern Humanities Conference met in Asheville, North Carolina. I had heard that...
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A Lion's Tale: Making Wolfe Howl
His fiction and letters indicate that Thomas Wolfe had quite a sense of humor, yet we rarely hear about specific incidents of his laughing out loud. One summer evening seventy years ago, sitting on the porch of his grandmother's boardinghouse, future...
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And the Soul Shall Dance: Thomas Wolfe's Influence on Wakako Yamauchi
Since its inception in 1977, the Thomas Wolfe Review has published several articles that trace Wolfe's influence on such later American writers as James Agee, Herman Wouk, Carson McCullers, Ray Bradbury, Jack Kerouac, and Pat Conroy. After perusing...
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A Note from the Editor
"To a certain degree, a book can be a substitute for liberty." Thomas Wolfe experienced this truth, but the words are those of Karl Roder, prisoner of the Third Reich. Among the books that comforted Roder and other inmates of Dachau was a German translation...
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Bibliography
"Bibliography" is a list of published works that focus on Thomas Wolfe. Some entries include an annotation. An asterisk (*) indicates a work published before the previous issue of the Thomas Wolfe Review but that became known to us only recently. More...
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Brother Tom and the Moravians: Two Letters from Ben Wolfe
While waiting to be drafted in 1918, (1) Ben Wolfe wrote to his brother Tom, (2) inviting him to Winston-Salem to witness the Moravians' Easter morning services. (3) Thomas Wolfe, then a student at the University of North Carolina, accepted Ben's invitation...
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Eugene Goes to Sydney
Whenever Eugene Gant goes to Sydney in Look Homeward, Angel (1929) and O Lost (2000), he retraces trips to Raleigh that the author Thomas Wolfe had made when he was a student at Chapel Hill between 1916 and 1920. Wolfe, so to speak, guides or mentors...
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"It Was like a Dream of Hell": Gantian Dreams Deferred
In the turn-of-the-century America in which Thomas Wolfe grew up, citizens became more and more attracted to and convinced of the (so-called) American Dream, thanks in part to the successes of Andrew Carnegie and John D. Rockefeller who acquired great...
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Journey to the Interior: The Influence of Xenophon's Anabasis on Thomas Wolfe's O Lost
In a 1947 essay introducing the William B. Wisdom Collection at Harvard, (1) Scribner's editor Maxwell Perkins explained that he and Wolfe had agreed to cut a scene depicting W. O. Gant's childhood from the Look Homeward, Angel prologue because it...
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Katamoto and Japanese Artists in New York in the Early 1930s
One hundred years ago in Japan, study abroad was limited to an elite few who traveled on Japanese government scholarships or private funds. As to studying art overseas, almost all of the elite Japanese went to Paris to learn Western painting or sculpture....
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Mother vs. Daughter: The Relationship between Eliza and Helen in Look Homeward, Angel
In Thomas Wolfe's Look Homeward, Angel, Eliza and Helen Gant are at odds with one another. Critical analyses of the novel emphasize the envy and spitefulness pervading the mother and daughter's relationship. (1) Indeed, the women clash over family...
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News
"News" contains information about recent or upcoming events of interest to readers of this journal, who are invited to send items for this section to twostrange2000@yahoo.com. THOMAS WOLFE SOCIETY NEWS Thomas Wolfe Society Officers, 2007-2009...
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Notes
"Notes" is a feature relating and recording information on Thomas Wolfe and Wolfe studies, including history (cultural, literary, and otherwise), biography, criticism, and reference. Some entries may inform of discoveries at length; others may simply...
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Thomas Wolfe in Nazi Concentration Camps
Thomas Wolfe was present in Nazi concentration camps. (1) Yet he was not among the numerous tourists, journalists, and other visitors who at regular intervals were allowed to observe some of these notorious places. (2) Dachau, for instance, by the...
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Thomas Wolfe: Say It with Music-Continuum (2007)
The lyrical writings of Thomas Wolfe seem to cry out from their pages for musical accompaniment. --Don Bishop, Charlotte Observer 15 October 1950 By the time I happened upon Don Bishop's 1950 feature article about the soon-to-be-premiered Thomas...
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Wilma Dykeman: Her Time and the River
Wilma Dykeman--our writer and speaker with a recognized, truthful voice in fiction and nonfiction. Her indispensable presence. She completed her formal education at Northwestern University after she took her associate degree at Biltmore Junior College...
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Wolfe Studies in Azerbaijan: My Acquaintance with the Work of a Great American Writer
The first time I heard the name of Thomas Wolfe was while I was studying for my university degree. I was writing a thesis on "The Idea of Selfless Love in the Works of Francis Scott Fitzgerald," based on Tender Is the Night and The Great Gatsby. In...
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