Thomas Wolfe Review

Articles from Vol. 34, Annual

"A Flash of Fire": Illness and the Body in Look Homeward, Angel
In Illness as Metaphor, Susan Sontag describes illness as the "night-side of life" (3). Everyone, she explains, by virtue of being born, "holds dual citizenship, in the kingdom of the well and in the kingdom of the sick" (3). It is a realm, according...
A Note from the Editor
The portrait on the cover of the 2010 Thomas Wolfe Review is an artist's rendering of a well-known photograph taken in Germany in 1935. This overlaying of one medium on another, drawing distanced from photo by decades, makes for a cover suitable to...
Artists and Stereotypes: Thomas Wolfe's Acquaintance with Clifford Odets
While much biographical scholarship on Thomas Wolfe has been published over the last seventy years, only a few of the numerous studies mention his brief mid-1930s acquaintance with Jewish playwright Clifford Odets. Most biographers name-drop Odets...
Bibliography
"Bibliography" is a list of published works that focus on Thomas Wolfe. Some entries include a brief annotation. An asterisk (*) indicates an item that appeared before the previous issue of the Thomas Wolfe Review but that became known to us only recently....
Bright Engines of Life: Trains and the Railroad in Thomas Wolfe's the Web and the Rock
From the time of the inaugural train ride on the first American railroad in 1830, (1) the train and the railroad have held a fixed place in America's consciousness, manifested by depictions of the train in literature and resulting in the development...
Chapel Hill Recollections
I was on the "Hill" in 1961 through 1964 when the following events took place. These were mellow, good years, before we lost so much to that pariah, Vietnam. The "Hill" then was a place of laconic charm, where studies took second place to soaking up...
Dr. R. Dietz Wolfe: In Memoriam
I got a letter from Frank the other day and I shall answer him soon. Dietzie a bright student, he says. We're all bright in this family. We may not amount to three whoops but it is not from lack of intelligence. --Thomas Wolfe, 19 April 1921 (1)...
For the Record
"For the Record" is a brief information resource for Wolfe readers and scholars. For more information about the items in this section, please visit our Web site: www.thomaswolfe.org. The Estate of Thomas Wolfe Inquiries regarding matters of copyright...
French and American Prometheans: Honore De Balzac and Thomas Wolfe
Honore de Balzac and Thomas Wolfe were Promethean thieves of fire--and tricksters, for all artists are con men. Both were born as centuries turned, Balzac in 1799, Wolfe a century later in 1900. Both died young, Balzac at fifty-one, Wolfe at thirty-seven....
Gant in Oxford
Of Time and the River and I came into the world within months of one another. But infants know nothing of stories, and it would be some years before I discovered Wolfe's stories and novels and began to imagine a link between my personal destiny and...
Ghost, Come Back Again
It had started to snow on our tiny yellow cottage in Shuffletown as dusk came on and, when the call came from Patricia, there were probably six inches in our backyard--a rarity in that part of the North Carolina Piedmont. I sat on the living room's...
Has the World Grown Too Insane for Wolfe-Or Is There Hope?
The early twenty-first century marks a period of tremendous change that poses big challenges for people who care about keeping alive the discussion and study of Thomas Wolfe and literature in general. Part of the change is sparked by technology, but...
In Memoriam
Mary Westall Large, a cousin of Thomas Wolfe and a longtime member of the TWS, died 4 February 2010 in Augusta, Georgia. She was 93. Born in Asheville on 20 July 1916--during the catastrophic flood that her cousin described in his fiction, notably...
Notes
"Notes" is a feature relating and recording information on Thomas Wolfe and Wolfe studies, including history (cultural, literary, and otherwise), biography, criticism, and reference. Some entries may inform of discoveries at length; others may simply...
The Doctor and His Wife: Might There Have Been a Kinder, Gentler Wolfe?
Readers of Thomas Wolfe can safely assume that whatever the author writes about his characters, he is more often than not presenting physically and psychologically accurate portraits of real persons. What upset the townspeople of Asheville when they...
The Fruit of Forty Thousand Years
Look Homeward, Angel, the first novel by North Carolina author Thomas Wolfe, saw publication in 1929 to overwhelmingly positive reviews. Many hailed it for its elegant prose, vivid imagery, and moving characters. Walter Adams, in the Asheville Times,...
Thomas Wolfe Review Index 2001-2010
This index covers a total of ten issues of the Thomas Wolfe Review--volume 25 (2001) through volume 34 (2010). It should be noted that Terry Roberts was editor of volume 25, while Anne Zahlan was editor of volumes 26-34. This is the fifth index published...
Thomas Wolfe's Greenville/ Eugene Gant's Blackstone
Beginning in the 1920s, a generation of young writers created a South-centered American literature. Their work--the novels and short stories of William Faulkner, Thomas Wolfe, Flannery O'Connor, Katherine Anne Porter, Walker Percy, Robert Penn Warren,...
Thomas Wolfe Society Meeting (May 28-30, 2010; Greenville, South Carolina)
Thomas Wolfe Society Meeting (May 28-30, 2010; Greenville, South Carolina): Gathering in the town where Thomas Wolfe was once thrown in jail (an episode he fictionalized in Of Time and the River), the Society held its thirty-second annual meeting at...
Thomas Wolfe Studies in China
In Chinese academic circles, Thomas Wolfe's position has been awkward. On the one hand, he is well known for his unique complicated novels and well loved by Chinese readers; on the other hand, researchers in China have paid little attention to him,...
Wolfe's "Drug Store": Theme and Variation in the Hound of Darkness
Thomas Wolfe believed that Americans were a nighttime people, and he filled his first novel with nighthawks: the Altamont of Look Homeward, Angel gains depth and life as Ben Gant and his cronies from the paper leave their night shifts and meet up with...
Wolfe's Racism Revisited: A Response to Robert H. Brinkmeyer Jr
Following the recent trend of reading southern writers within a global context, Robert H. Brinkmeyer Jr., in The Fourth Ghost: White Southern Writers and European Fascism, 1930-1950 (2009), offers a valuable examination of the ways that major writers...