Thomas Wolfe Review

Articles from Vol. 30, Annual

A Nonagenarian's Memories of Wolfe
The reminescences of Esther Leeming Tuttle feature a couple of interesting anecdotes about Thomas Wolfe, particularly the events that she says took place on a warm spring evening in 1936. Tuttle states that at a celebration for her ninetieth birthday...
A Note from the Editor
This issue marks the thirtieth year of the Thomas Wolfe Review, founded as the Thomas Wolfe Newsletter by John S. Phillipson and Aldo P. Magi, and this landmark is not the only current cause for celebration. We note the fiftieth anniversary of Elizabeth...
Artifacts
Tom Beaman's "Bringing the Thomas Wolfe Artifact Collections 'Home Again,'" along with five color photographs, appears in Common Ground (Fall 2006), a publication of the Coe Foundation for Archaeological Research in Raleigh, North Carolina. Beaman...
Bibliography
"Bibliography" is a list of published works that focus on Thomas Wolfe. Some entries include an annotation. An asterisk (*) indicates a work published before the previous issue of the Thomas Wolfe Review but that became known to us only recently. More...
Books and Collecting
Dinitia Smith's article "The Brooklyn Book Festival: A Literary Voice with a Pronounced Brooklyn Accent" in the 15 September 2006 issue of the New York Times mentions writers who wrote of Brooklyn, ranging from Whitman to Jonathan Safran Foer and Jonathan...
Can or Can't Redux
Anne Ponder, newly installed chancellor at UNC-Asheville, was the banquet speaker for the Wolfe Society meeting in Chapel Hill last May. "Coming Home" by Tommy Hays for the September 2006 issue of Our State magazine is a profile of Ponder. Hays writes:...
David Madden
Two of David Madden's previously published essays on Wolfe appear in his Touching the Web of Southern Novelists (Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 2006). [See, in this issue of the Review, "Bibliography" (160) and a review by Bryan Giemza (147-49).]...
Favorable Mention and Otherwise
The new paperback edition of Look Homeward, Angel (New York: Scribner, 2006) includes three pages of comments by four contemporary novelists: Charles Frazier, Elizabeth Kostova, Pat Conroy, and William Gay. The section ("In Praise of Look Homeward,...
Horace Kephart and Thomas Wolfe's "Abomination," Look Homeward, Angel
Horace Kephart (1862-1931), writer, librarian, outdoorsman, became a widely known and highly respected authority on the mountains of western North Carolina. Author of the classic Our Southern Highlanders (1913; revised 1922), Kephart forged a remarkable...
Margaret and J. M. Roberts: Companions in the Education of Thomas Wolfe
The forebears of Margaret Hines Roberts and J. M. Roberts, the couple who, more than anyone else, were responsible for the early cultural and emotional development of Thomas Wolfe, were representative figures of the settlement of the Midwest and the...
More Memories
In 1919 George M. Stephens (1904-78) moved with his family from Charlotte to Asheville, where his father became copublisher of the Asheville Citizen. Stephens attended the Asheville School for Boys and became an editor, writer, and historian. He later...
Mountain Grills and Hoggish Minds: W. O. Gant's Allusive Invective
Unlike most admirers of Thomas Wolfe's fiction, I did not read any of it, except for an anthology piece about the circus at dawn, at what seems to be the agreed-upon time of life for full appreciation of its emotional pull. I was in fact twenty-five...
October Has Come Again
Reporting for the 18 October 2006 edition of the Greensboro News-Record on the fall festival in Gibsonville, North Carolina, Chris Coletta observes improvement in this year's festival where "on the sort of breezy day that prompted Thomas Wolfe to write...
Other
"Influenza and the Origins of the Phillips Collection, Washington, DC" by David M. Morens appears in the January 2006 issue of Emerging Infectious Diseases, a publication of the National Center for Infectious Diseases and the Centers for Disease Control...
Roth Errata/addenda
In the 2005 issue of this journal (pages 169-71), we mentioned Wolfean references in Stephen G. Kellman's then recent biography of Henry Roth, Redemption, but noted that no mention of a Wolfe character appears in Requiem for Harlem, the last volume...
Ted Mitchell
TWS member Ted Mitchell is working again at the Thomas Wolfe Memorial and no doubt helped ensure that the Old Kentucky Home was mentioned in "5 Quick Stops in Asheville" by Charlotte Observer travel editor John Bordsen on 8 October 2006. Bordsen groups...
"The Dark Was Hived with Flesh and Mystery" (1): Thomas Wolfe, the American Adam, and the Polemical Persona of Race
In his 1929 review of Thomas Wolfe's Look Homeward, Angel, Jonathan Daniels remarks that, aside from the portrayal of the Gant family, Wolfe presents "innumerable minor characters, prostitutes, white and black; loose women, Negroes, and dope-fiends,...
The Shock of Thomas Wolfe
Louis Rubin presented this account of Wolfe's impact and influence on him on the occasion of his acceptance of a lifetime achievement award from the Thomas Wolfe Society at its May 2006 meeting at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill. These...
"The Story of a Tall Man": Thomas Wolfe and the Problems of Literary Iconography
What a tragedy that a man who was so shy and would so much rather have been allowed to have his moods had to be given a body that made him a curiosity even to people who did recognize him as an artist. --Havis Choate, in a letter to John Skally...
The Thomas Wolfe Collection in the North Carolina Collection at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
The North Carolina Collection, located in Wilson Library at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC), is home to one of the most comprehensive Thomas Wolfe collections in the world. Beginning with a gift of manuscripts and photographs...
The Thomas Wolfe Memorial Garden in Chapel Hill
Although Thomas Wolfe is not taught as regularly in American literature courses at his alma mater as he once was, the University of North Carolina continues to take pride in its famous author. On University Day and at Commencement, some lines of Wolfe...
Thomas Wolfe and the Family Romance
As Oscar Wilde quipped, "Children begin by loving their parents; as they grow older they judge them; sometimes, they forgive them." According to Freud's theory of the family romance, children become disenchanted with their parents much earlier than...
Thomas Wolfe Fiction Prize
Sherry Shaw of Gastonia, North Carolina, is the winner of the 2006 Thomas Wolfe Fiction Prize from the North Carolina Writers' Network for her story "October." Final judge Josephine Humphreys said of "October": "I admire this story for the power and...
Thomas Wolfe Society News
Thomas Wolfe Society Officers, 2005-2007 President Rob Ensign, Westbrook, Maine (rensign@teleport.com) Vice President Shawn Holliday, Winchester, Kentucky (coriolanus31@aol.com) Treasurer Bob Powell, Birmingham, Michigan (bob.r.powell@gm.com)...
Thomas Wolfe's Other German Girlfriend: Who Was Lisa Hasait?
The distinction of being known as "Thomas Wolfe's German girlfriend" properly belongs on several grounds to Thea Voelcker. For one thing, of all Wolfe's relationships with German women, that with Voelcker was the most intense, even though it was also...
Why Thomas Wolfe Is a "Crate" American Novelist
For a long time I have been fascinated--and also bothered--by some of the statements William Faulkner made about Thomas Wolfe. More than once, Faulkner put Wolfe at the top of the list of contemporary authors, but he spent just as much time backtracking...
W.O. Gant and the Restraint of Laughter
The proximity of the tragic to the comic seems to account also for the fact that a person can laugh until he begins to cry. --Soren Kierkegaard Perhaps the most striking aspect of Thomas Wolfe's prose is not his lonely tragic vision, rhetorical...
Wolfe at the White House
America may be all the terrible things these English and French people have told me it is; it is also a great many other terrible things they know nothing of, but that I do know from the bottom up--but the fact remains it is the only place in this...