Thomas Wolfe Review

Articles from Vol. 32, Annual

A Note from the Editor
The cover of this issue features an illustration of an early scene from Look Homeward, Angel in which baby Eugene's resentful realization of the imprisoning effect of his inability to use language leads to painful awareness of the loneliness that...
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Bibliography
"Bibliography" is a list of published works that focus on Thomas Wolfe. Some of the entries include a brief annotation. An asterisk (*) indicates an item that appeared before the previous issue of the Thomas Wolfe Review but that became known to...
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Dixieland: A Fugue in Time
THE HOUSE, it seems, is more important than the characters. "In me you exist," says the house. For almost a hundred years, for ninety-nine years, it has enhanced, embraced and sheltered the family, but there is no doubt that it can go on without...
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Gone to Texas: Looking for Wolfe at the Harry Ransom Center
More than ten years ago, Aldo P. Magi brought to my attention a brochure from a 1960s literary exhibit featuring manuscript materials from the research library at the University of Texas in Austin. The material included Thomas Wolfe manuscript from...
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In Memoriam
We begin this section by providing space for the staff of the University of South Carolina Press, who wished to express their gratitude and respect for Matthew J. Bruccoli, their friend and colleague. The section continues with our own memorial...
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Literary News
HarperCollins has announced the upcoming publication of a book that will certainly interest our readers. The firm is reissuing the first three sections of The Web and the Rock as The Web and the Root, with an introduction by John L. Idol Jr. Publication...
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Narrative, Work, and Grief in Thomas Wolfe's the Lost Boy
The Lost Boy, haunting and elegiac in its treatment of a sibling's death, captures the lostness that informed much of Thomas Wolfe's life and work. It also illustrates the bifurcated nature of grief and the burden it imposes on those who remain...
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"No Blank Pages": A Tribute to Matthew J. Bruccoli (1931-2008)
No one who worked with Prof. Matthew J. Bruccoli, or attended one of his lectures, or even walked within earshot of his office, could ever forget his voice: a Bronx bark, terse, direct, passionate, and booming with authority. His oft-repeated words...
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Notes
"Notes" is a feature relating and recording information on Thomas Wolfe and Wolfe studies, including history (cultural, literary, and otherwise), biography, criticism, and reference. Some entries may inform of discoveries at length; others may simply...
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Paper Doll Matinee: Thomas Wolfe's Theatre
If one attempts a conversation about Thomas Wolfe with an individual unfamiliar with Wolfe's work, the condensed biography will most likely include the term "failed playwright." By 1922 Wolfe aspired to become a professional dramatist (Mitchell...
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Return to Asheville: Wolfe Writes to J. M. Roberts Jr
Thomas Wolfe's self-imposed exile from Asheville ended in triumphant victory but not without the mounting pressures that nearly pushed him over the edge. On his return trip to New York, Wolfe stopped at Baltimore and recounted his woes to newspaper...
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That "Mother-Spoiled Glut of Oily Fat": John Skally Terry in Thomas Wolfe's Life and Work
In addition to reading and studying the literary works of Thomas Wolfe, both scholars and fans enjoy discovering more about Wolfe's relationships with others, especially his mother and other family members, his lovers, his editors, his literary...
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The Death of Gant
The Death of Gant By Thomas Wolfe Edited by John L. Idol Jr. N.p.: Thomas Wolfe Society, 2007. xx + 80 pp. (softcover). [ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Wolfe's good friend Desmond Powell, in his review of You Can't Go Home Again, said of Of...
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The Harvey Harris Illustrations for Look Homeward, Angel
The various characters and scenes of Look Homeward, Angel are all there, in fifty-five ink and graphite drawings, with watercolor highlights, carefully executed on illustration boards that range in size from 3 1/2 x 8 inches to 12 x 15 inches. The...
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The Lamb Carbon Transcripts: Another Dark Miracle of Chance
In 1995 Carolyn Lamb, a widow in New Canaan, Connecticut, found certain materials among the papers of her deceased husband. Recognizing that the materials involved Thomas Wolfe, she contacted her friend, the late Bertha Perkins Frothingham (daughter...
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The Thomas Wolfe Fiction Prize
Paul Mihas of Durham, North Carolina, is the winner of the 2008 Thomas Wolfe Fiction Prize from the North Carolina Writers' Network for his story "This Is Not a Barren Place." Final judge Ashley Warlick said of the Mihas story: "The opening moments,...
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Thomas Wolfe and Max Beckmann: A Creative Sympathy
This is the story of the relationship between two men who never met. As one can imagine, it falls a bit into the detective genre. Thomas Wolfe and Max Beckmann spoke different languages and led very different lives. But after reading Look Homeward,...
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Thomas Wolfe's 1935 Visit to St. Louis
On the occasion of the Thomas Wolfe Society's 2008 meeting, longtime member Harold D. Nichols of St. Louis assembled a number of materials documenting the visit that inspired Wolfe to write The Lost Boy. Among the textual and photographic items...
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Thomas Wolfe's Aborted Second Novel: "The [Hudson] River People"
After completing his first novel and before it was accepted for publication, Thomas Wolfe anticipated an objection that a few critics would surely voice upon its appearance: that the novel was patently autobiographical and that admirers of his work...
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Thomas Wolfe's Haiku World
A few years ago, I read a paper on Thomas Wolfe in Japan. In the question period, a scholar of American literature asked me: "Where do you put Thomas Wolfe among the great writers of the twentieth century, such as Faulkner and Hemingway?" I answered:...
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Thomas Wolfe Society News
Thomas Wolfe Society Officers, 2007-2009 President Shawn Holliday, Winchester, Kentucky (TWSPresident@aol.com) Vice President David Radavich, Charleston, Illinois (daradavich@eiu.edu) Treasurer...
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What Do Charles W. Chesnutt and Thomas Wolfe Have to Tell Us about North Carolina?
I think these people are great people and that they should be told about. (1) These people have never been treated from a closely sympathetic standpoint, they have not had their day in court. Their friends have written of them, and their enemies;...
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Wolfe and Krazy Kat
Was Thomas Wolfe a fan of George Herriman's comic strip Krazy Kat? Many in his generation were; the strip appeared in Hearst newspapers, having been, as they say today, "spun" off an earlier strip called The Dingbats. (1) The Dingbat family's cellar...
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