Kritika

Articles from Vol. 11, No. 3, Summer

An Interview with Edward L. Keenan
Think of the words "apocrypha" and "forgery," and most historians of Russia are likely to conjure up the bespectacled and bearded image of emeritus Harvard professor Edward L. Keenan. Indeed, few others have poured so much effort and erudition into...
Economic Reconstruction or Corporate Raiding? the Borisoglebskii Monastery in Torzhok and the Ascription of Monasteries in the 17th Century
In spite of a recent revival of interest in medieval Russian monastic life, the administrative regime of Muscovite monasteries and hermitages and their political and economic aspirations are still incompletely understood. In seeking to counter the...
Hunting for Dogs in 17th-Century Muscovy
In their introduction to the anthology that grew out of their pioneering conference on human--animal bonds in modern and postmodern Russia, Jane Costlow and Amy Nelson position the collection within the rapidly emerging field of "animal studies," which...
"Royal Marks": Reading the Bodies of Russian Pretenders, 17th-19th Centuries
Over a period of almost 300 years, from the Time of Troubles of the early 17th century to the end of the 19th century, many Russians believed that members of their royal family--tsars and tsareviches--bore on their bodies special marks which indicated...
Systems and Senses: New Research on Muscovy and the Historiography on Early Modern Europe
I feel fortunate to be able to discuss the topics presented in these articles. Their temporal focus on the 17th century is fortunate as well. European history should make much greater use of the research on 17th-century Muscovy than it does now. A...
The Replacement of the Composite Reflex Bow by Firearms in the Muscovite Cavalry
The Muscovite cavalry went over to carbines and pistols during the course of the 17th century, yet firearms were not better handheld weapons than the composite reflex bow that the cavalry had been using. The carbine was a light form of musket that...