Kritika

Articles from Vol. 7, No. 2, Spring

An Interview with James Billington
In this issue we continue our series of "e-interviews," in which we pose written questions to figures in the field who, we believe, in their capacity as scholars and public figures will be of significant interest to the readers of Kritika. We are especially...
Dilemmas of a Progressive Administrator: Baron Boris Nolde
Upon Boris Emmanuilovich Nolde's death in 1948, one of his friends and fellow emigres, the Socialist Revolutionary Mark Vishniak, classified him as a man of "moderate liberal views." Vishniak then hastened to add: "But one would be hard pressed to...
Intellectual Constructs and Political Issues
The essays in this section introduce us to three authors of liberal persuasion whose works touch on Russia's political development and, at least by implication, on the meaning of citizenship in Russia. Politics, however, was not their central concern:...
Religion, War, and Revolution: E. N. Trubetskoi's Liberal Construction of Russian National Identity, 1912-20
Rarely has religion been as closely associated with national identity as in the case of Russia, at least at the level of conscious representation. Religion, the very essence of "Holy Russia," is central to most versions of the "Russian Idea." (1) The...
Russia and the Defeat of Napoleon (1812-14)
Although a vast and often excellent literature exists on the Napoleonic Wars, there remain important gaps and misconceptions in our understanding both of the wars themselves and of the context in which they were fought. Probably the most significant...
The Ideal Citizen and Real Subject in Late Imperial Russia
Can the term and concept of citizenship be fruitfully applied to the study and understanding of late imperial Russia? If Russia was an autocracy, its individual members were subjects, not citizens. By this logic, "autocratic citizenship" appears to...