Kritika

Articles from Vol. 7, No. 3, Summer

An Imperial Rights Regime: Law and Citizenship in the Russian Empire
What difference can empire make to citizenship? In this article, I address the question of imperial citizenship in Russia through an exploration of imperial law, rights, courts, and their use by lowly members of the polity. I want to enable a more...
"I Have Not Read, but I Will Say": Soviet Literary Audiences and Changing Ideas of Social Membership, 1958-66
On 23 October 1958, the Swedish Academy awarded Boris Pasternak the Nobel Prize in Literature. The news provoked a furious response from the Central Committee, even though the authorities in Moscow had long expected this outcome. (1) Despite the general...
In the State's Embrace? Civil Acts in an Imperial Order
One of the principal characteristics of the modern state has been its aspiration to acquire extensive and detailed information about the population it oversees. As James C. Scott remarks, whereas its premodern counterpart was content with levels of...
Soviet Citizenship, More or Less: Rights, Emotions, and States of Civic Belonging
In an otherwise tragic memoir, Eugenia Ginzburg retells the joke of a former prisoner and good friend. Entitled "The Social and Political Structure of Kolyma," the joke describes a microcosm of Soviet society in which "there were no fewer than nine...
The Civic Duty to Hate: Stalinist Citizenship as Political Practice and Civic Emotion (Kiev, 1943-53)
In contrast to traditional scholarship that views citizenship as a status of a certain category of persons, present-day scholars understand it as a set of institutionally embedded political, social, and cultural practices that define a person as a...
The Elusive Civic Subject in Russian History
Imagine that after ordering documents you had to destroy the archive. This is more or less the dilemma of archaeologists. The tools that make an archaeological dig destroy an unspoiled site, removing the possibility of verification. Historians face...
The Problem of Social Cohesion
Concepts of citizenship, rights, and even nationalism provide only weak links connecting the six essays in this section. Yet a common theme does emerge from packaging the essays together. Burbank's "imperial rights regime," Werth's civic acts in an...
Tiutchev versus Foucault? Citizenship and Subjecthood in Russian History
The declared aim of Vladimir Putin's presidency has been to end a decade and a half of reform and upheaval in Russia by restoring the "vertical [structure] of power" and instituting a "dictatorship of the law." We might observe, as historians, that...
United in Gratitude: Honoring Soldiers and Defining the Nation in Russia's Great War
One reason the Great War of 1914-18 was so terrible an upheaval was its unprecedented scale. Industrialized countries subscribing to the belief that modern wars were won by the "nation in arms" fielded giant conscript armies armed with weapons of unprecedented...