Stanford Law & Policy Review

Articles from Vol. 23, No. 2, Spring

A Blanket Too Short and Too Narrow: California's Nonpartisan Blanket Primary
INTRODUCTION California's ballot initiative process has produced its fair share of political controversy throughout the state's history. Initiatives such as Proposition 98 (banning affirmative action in the public sector), Proposition 187 (denying...
Communities and the California Commission
INTRODUCTION In most respects, the redistricting initiatives that California's voters approved in 2008 and 2010 were standard good-government fare. (1) As reformers had long advocated, the measures withdrew the power of drawing district lines from...
Democrats at DOJ: Why Partisan Use of the Voting Rights Act Might Not Be So Bad after All
INTRODUCTION In notable ways, the ongoing dispute over redistricting in Texas offers a mirror image to one of the major redistricting battles of the last decade, only with Democratic and Republican roles reversed. In both Texas v. United States...
Drafting Proper Short Bill Titles: Do States Have the Answer?
INTRODUCTION Short bill titles at the federal and state level have historically been used as legal reference points for legislation. Over the years, however, many of these titles have changed their function and now act as much more than referential...
Drawing Lines in Shifting Sands: The DOJ, the VRA, and the 2011 Redistricting Process
INTRODUCTION Those who criticize section 5 of the Voting Rights Act (VRA) on either constitutional or policy grounds emphasize several extraordinary features of the statute. Its selective application to certain parts of the country represents an...
Drawing Voters Back into the Electoral Process: Why and How
INTRODUCTION Redistricting is required to ensure equal representation under the law, but the irony is the current process itself is leading to the destruction of a representative government. There is an enormous amount of energy and money that goes...
Redistricting in Today's Shifting Racial Landscape
"I was shortsighted, naive and narrow-minded to endorse the concept of drawing Congressional districts to take racial demographics' into account." (1) INTRODUCTION Cynthia Tucker, in her confessional editorial in the South's premier newspaper,...
Reforming Public Pensions in Rhode Island
INTRODUCTION On November 18, 2011, Rhode Island governor Lincoln Chafee signed into law the Rhode Island Retirement Security Act of 2011 (RIRSA), which dramatically alters the pension benefits provided to state employees. (1) Rhode Island is not...
Seats, Votes, Citizens, and the One Person, One Vote Problem
INTRODUCTION Few passages from American court cases have become as familiar as "one person, one vote." Although we know of no authoritative count of the frequency with which that phrase has appeared in print, we suspect that it may even rival the...
The Cure for What Ails: A Realistic Remedy for the Medical Malpractice "Crisis"
INTRODUCTION Doctors hate lawyers. (1) Whether previously subjected to a medical malpractice lawsuit or simply apprehensive that a claim may someday be filed, physicians blame lawyers for what they view as a medical liability system run amok. (2)...