The Washington Times (Washington, DC)

The Washington Times is a conservative newspaper published Monday through Friday by the Washington Times LLC. Its editorial headquarters is in Washington, D.C. and it's been published since 1982. The owner of the Washington Times is the Unification Church.The Washington Times covers local, national and world news, with an emphasis on politics. The paper is known for its conservative slant, since it was founded as a response to the more liberal Washington Post. Readership is nationwide.The fact that Reverend Sun Myung Moon of the Unification Churchfounded The Washington Times has made the paper controversial from its very beginning. The question remains as to how much Sun Myung Moon or his aides influence the editorial content of the paper. In 2003, five staff members resigned when their editorials criticizing South Korea for its political repression were stifled. However, not all readers are critical of the way the Washington Times handles news; it is reported that President Ronald Reagan read the paper every day while in office. Sam Dealey is the executive editor, The Washington Times LLC is named as publisher and Chris Dolan is managing editor.

Articles from May 27, 2003

Accessing the Web Overseas Gets Easier
Byline: Mark Kellner, THE WASHINGTON TIMES KAUNAS, Lithuania - It's almost 10 p.m. here and it's barely dusk; the days are long in the Baltic region, where I've spent the past week on business. Along the way, I've picked up a bit of knowledge about...
Read preview Overview
'Achievement of Courage'; Bush Honors Troops, Reads Letters of Fallen
Byline: Jon Ward, THE WASHINGTON TIMES President Bush yesterday urged Americans to remember the sacrifices of U.S. servicemen and women who died in uniform and to honor the memories of those killed in Iraq and Afghanistan. "On this day, especially,...
Read preview Overview
Addressing Unreasoning Hatreds
Byline: Gary M. Galles, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES Lots of ink has been spilled trying to explain a hatred of the United States that can cause the terrorism of September 11, regimes devoted to our destruction, and even actions of "allies" to...
Read preview Overview
A Strike against Traffic Cameras
Byline: THE WASHINGTON TIMES Increasingly, state and city governments are using cameras to nail commuters for supposedly speeding or running red lights. The ticket arrives in the mail with no proof that the owner of the car was behind the wheel...
Read preview Overview
At the DMZ, Troops Fight a 'Ghost War'; U.S. Keeps Uneasy Peace on Korea's Border
Byline: Willis Witter, THE WASHINGTON TIMES OBSERVATION POST OUELLETTE, South Korea - The American soldiers turn their heads slowly, examining ridges, trees and even tiny twigs that explode in detail amid green hues in the night-vision scopes suspended...
Read preview Overview
Balancing Liberty and Security
Byline: Paul Rosenzweig, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES How ironic that the war on terrorism we've been waging since September 11 a war meant to ensure our safety should itself inspire fear in some Americans. Yet cries of "Big Brother" materialize...
Read preview Overview
Board Eyes Safeguards for Charter Schools
Byline: Jabeen Bhatti, THE WASHINGTON TIMES D.C. Board of Education officials say they will revamp hiring policies for charter schools after The Washington Times reported last week that the principal of the city's oldest charter school is a felon...
Read preview Overview
Bush Case on Defense Plan Cites N. Korea; Directive Orders Antimissile System
Byline: Bill Gertz, THE WASHINGTON TIMES President Bush specifically names North Korea as a key threat in an unpublished order on missile defense and says such a system is needed as a hedge against military surprises and intelligence failures. ...
Read preview Overview
Cautious Progress toward Peace
Byline: THE WASHINGTON TIMES Now that Prime Minister Ariel Sharon and the Israeli Cabinet have accepted President Bush's road map for an Israeli-Palestinian peace agreement the first time that an Israeli government has formally endorsed a Palestinian...
Read preview Overview
Cokie Roberts' 'Roast' Becomes a Love-In
Byline: Gabriella Boston, THE WASHINGTON TIMES Politicians and media colleagues utterly failed in their assignment to roast the revered Cokie Roberts at the American News Women's Club's annual dinner. "It's intimidating," former Rep. Constance...
Read preview Overview
Democrats Are Coming
Byline: John McCaslin, THE WASHINGTON TIMES Democrats are coming About the only body in Washington that Democrats are in control of these days is the Democratic National Committee. So rather than convening a summit on the South Lawn of the...
Read preview Overview
Digene Stock Rises on Cancer-Test Results
Byline: Marguerite Higgins, THE WASHINGTON TIMES Shares of Digene Corp. surged last week after a German study supported the use of the Gaithersburg biotechnology company's screening test for cervical cancer. Digene stock closed at $23.60 Friday...
Read preview Overview
Driving Down Rates; Low Interest Rates Spur Online Auto Refinancing
Byline: Chris Baker, THE WASHINGTON TIMES Robert A. Walls knew interest rates were falling fast, but it never occurred to him that he could take advantage of the record lows by refinancing his car loan. Then a few weeks ago, Mr. Walls, a McLean...
Read preview Overview
Europe and Genetically Modified Foods
Byline: THE WASHINGTON TIMES During a two-day visit to Washington, German Labor and Economy Minister Wolfgang Clement spoke in favor of abolishing Europe's discriminatory policy against genetically modified foods produced in the United States and...
Read preview Overview
Exports and Imports; for U.S. Manufacturers, It Is a Difficult Balancing Act
Byline: Donald Manzullo and Michael R. Czinkota, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES U.S. manufacturing needs policy help, now. Low exports and a surge of imports have left the sector vulnerable, endangering future economic progress and hollowing out...
Read preview Overview
Extended Deflation Would Curb Benefits
Byline: Mike Causey, THE WASHINGTON TIMES An extended spell of deflation where prices go down, not up will trim the January cost-of-living adjustment (COLA) for people who get civil service retirement benefits, retired military pay or Social Security...
Read preview Overview
Follow the Money and Immigrants
Byline: THE WASHINGTON TIMES Brenda Walker of Berkeley, Calif., asks, "Why does America allow continued immigration from a culture that despises everything we treasure?" ("Muslim immigration," Letters, Saturday). The answer can be found in that...
Read preview Overview
Gephardt Takes Early Lead in 'Endorsement Primary'; 30 Congressional Colleagues Back Missourian
Byline: Charles Hurt, THE WASHINGTON TIMES Rep. Richard A. Gephardt, Missouri Democrat, leads the pack of presidential hopefuls in the so-called "endorsement primary." Earlier this month, Mr. Gephardt announced endorsements from 30 House colleagues,...
Read preview Overview
Heavy Play, Rain Make Field Quagmire
Byline: Patrick Stevens, THE WASHINGTON TIMES BALTIMORE - The biggest crowd in the 33-year history of the NCAA tournament saw perhaps the worst field conditions for a title game. The M&T Bank Stadium field absorbed four straight days of rain...
Read preview Overview
Holiday Loss No Deterrent for Students in Alexandria
Byline: Jabeen Bhatti, THE WASHINGTON TIMES Alexandria schools were open yesterday, despite grumbling by some students, parents and teachers. But students also took time out to plant flags and listen to veterans talk about the significance of Memorial...
Read preview Overview
Identity Crisis
Byline: Greg Pierce, THE WASHINGTON TIMES Identity crisis New York Times reporter Adam Clymer, following up on a Sunday article in which he portrayed the Republican Party as increasingly confident, wrote yesterday that the Democrats appear to...
Read preview Overview
Inside Terrorism; Suicide Bombers Are 'Culture of Death'
Byline: Joshua Sinai, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES Walter Laqueur holds the Kissinger Chair for Security Studies at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington. He is a prolific author and editor of some 136 books and anthologies...
Read preview Overview
Islamic Jihad Suspect Seeks to Represent Self; 7 More Charged in Knotty Terror Case
Byline: Jerry Seper, THE WASHINGTON TIMES A former University of South Florida professor, accused of being the North American leader of a Palestinian terrorist organization, wants to represent himself in a still-pending trial that has been deluged...
Read preview Overview
It's a Cocktail Party Crisis; but NATO Isn't Drunk with Problems
Byline: Tod Lindberg, THE WASHINGTON TIMES BRUSSELS - The Senate voted earlier this month to approve admission of seven Central and Eastern European countries from the former Soviet bloc into NATO, the transatlantic alliance. The vote was 96-0,...
Read preview Overview
Johnson Backstops Virginia to NCAA Title; Goalie Makes13 Saves and Is Named MOP
Byline: Patrick Stevens, THE WASHINGTON TIMES BALTIMORE - Tillman Johnson's season-long stretch of dominance culminated yesterday with a national championship. The Virginia goalie made 13 saves, including three in a critical 10-second sequence...
Read preview Overview
Legislation to Move Anti-Medicinal Pot Funds Turned Back; Would Allow Money for Partisan Ads
Byline: Steve Miller, THE WASHINGTON TIMES A House bill that would provide public funding for ad campaigns to fight medicinal-marijuana initiatives has been turned back because of language that could allow ads to become partisan attacks. The...
Read preview Overview
Mexico Slams Tancredo
Byline: James Morrison, THE WASHINGTON TIMES Mexico slams Tancredo Mexican Ambassador Juan Jose Bremer has accused Rep. Tom Tancredo, Colorado Republican, of insulting his country through the use of props at a press conference last week. Mr....
Read preview Overview
NEW JERSEY Devils vs. ANAHEIM Mighty Ducks
Byline: Dave Fay, THE WASHINGTON TIMES OFFENSE The term "dead puck era" is starting to catch on, and that's a good thing because it should get a lot of use in the next 10 days or so. Most of the top scorers for both teams have taken the postseason...
Read preview Overview
Once upon a Time, in a Vanished Land
Byline: Wesley Pruden, THE WASHINGTON TIMES A lot of people take credit for thinking up Memorial Day, but almost nobody remembers what we were thinking about in the first place. All it means to most Americans is a marker of the beginning of summer...
Read preview Overview
Rain Dampens Holiday Outings, Visits to Mall
Byline: Chris Baker, THE WASHINGTON TIMES The dreary weather forced many Washingtonians to cancel their plans for a Memorial Day barbecue or beach visit, but they didn't necessarily hit the malls to lift their spirits. Traffic was light at local...
Read preview Overview
Saddam Faithful Refuse to Surrender; Troops Still Face Deadly Hostile Action
Byline: Paul Martin, THE WASHINGTON TIMES BAGHDAD - The specter of Saddam Hussein resurfaced in Iraq yesterday, with U.S. forces suffering deadly attacks, pro-Saddam graffiti staining the capital and hooded Arab guerrillas vowing to avenge their...
Read preview Overview
Staying Power; Oates, Ducks Savoring Run to Cup Finals
Byline: Dave Fay, THE WASHINGTON TIMES EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. - Those who predicted last fall the Mighty Ducks of Anaheim would be participating in this spring's Stanley Cup Finals belong in the make believe world of Mickey Mouse and Pluto. Nobody,...
Read preview Overview
Striking a Deal; Asbestos-Litigation Crisis May Be Resolved
Byline: Amy Ridenour, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES Among conservatives, there is perhaps no senior figure in Washington more associated with compromise than Sen. Orrin Hatch, Utah Republican. Considered conservative by liberals, Mr. Hatch...
Read preview Overview
Texas Gathering Motivates 25,000 College-Age Faithful
Byline: Hugh Aynesworth, THE WASHINGTON TIMES BELLS, Texas - At least 25,000 young Christians sprawled out over much of a 400-acre ranch here during the weekend to pray, listen to spiritual guidance and share their religious beliefs. One area...
Read preview Overview
U.S. Awarded Women's World Cup
Byline: Ken Wright, THE WASHINGTON TIMES The Women's World Cup is coming back to the United States, and RFK Stadium is a likely early round venue. FIFA, world soccer's governing body, selected the United States, the 1999 host, over Sweden yesterday...
Read preview Overview
U.S. Troops' Role in Iraq Likened to Occupation of Postwar Japan
Byline: Rowan Scarborough, THE WASHINGTON TIMES American ground forces increasingly are shedding combat roles and taking on the job of running Iraq in an occupation of a kind not seen since the United States democratized Japan and Germany. In...
Read preview Overview
Volunteers
Byline: Stephanie K. Taylor, THE WASHINGTON TIMES Volunteers Greenbelt needs volunteers 50 years old and older through June 30 to help conduct surveys about a new assistance in living program for seniors. Call 301/474-8000. Other opportunities:...
Read preview Overview
When Hearts Beat Too Rapidly; Chest Implants and Treatments Cut Number of Fatalities
Byline: Jen Waters, THE WASHINGTON TIMES Jerome Ramsey, who spends his winters in Bethesda, knows what it feels like to be knocked literally off his feet. Due to a rapid heart rate, he has been shocked on multiple occasions through a medical device...
Read preview Overview
Wyrth Post Baker, 97, Homeopathy Specialist
Byline: THE WASHINGTON TIMES Dr. Wyrth Post Baker, a homeopathy specialist in the District, died of heart failure April 18 at Sibley Memorial Hospital. He was 97. A native of the District, Dr. Baker was born in Cleveland Park on Nov. 6, 1905....
Read preview Overview