Arms Control Today

Arms Control Today is a magazine published 10 times a year by the Arms Control Association in Washington, DC. Founded in 1972, its subjects are international arms control issues, peace and international affairs. Its audience includes policy makers, educators and the general public.

Articles from Vol. 34, No. 8, October

Biological Threat Assessment: Is the Cure Worse Than the Disease?
In the three years since the September 11 terrorist attacks and the subsequent mailings of anthrax bacterial spores, federal spending to protect the U.S. civilian population against biological terrorism has soared more than 18-fold. For the 2005 fiscal...
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Bush, Kerry Square off on Arms Control
The vivid memory of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks and the steadily increasing number of U.S. casualties in Iraq ensure that national security issues will remain prevalent throughout the homestretch of the 2004 presidential campaign.President George...
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Déjà Vu? Seoul's Past Nuclear Program
The recent revelations about South Korea's nuclear experiments recall a little-known chapter of three-decade-old history: Seoul began a nuclear weapons program in 1974, which it formally ended under U.S. pressure in late 1976.There are indications that...
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Does China Belong: In the Missile Technology Control Regime?
The prospect that China might soon join a U.S.-initiated regime aimed at controlling ballistic missiles might seem laughable. After all, the United States has imposed sanctions on China for years for hawking missiles and missile technologies to dozens...
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Editor's NOTE
When it comes to arms control, things are not always what they appear at first blush.Many observers were heartened this summer when one of President George W. Bush's top nuclear aides announced plans to cut the nuclear stockpile "almost in half" by 2012....
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ElBaradei Cites Progress by Iran, but Investigation Continues
In a Sept. 1 report to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Board of Governors, Director-General Mohamed ElBaradei said he was closing the agency's probe into two aspects of Iran's nuclear program. But contrary to Iran's wishes, he said that...
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Global Arms Market Still U.S. Domain
Defying a continuing decline in the global conventional arms market, the United States increased its weapons sales again last year, according to an annual report published Aug. 26 by the Congressional Research Service (CRS).The United States accounted...
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IAEA Probes Seoul's Nuclear Program
Inspectors from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) have been investigating South Korea's nuclear-related facilities after learning that its government secretly produced small quantities of nuclear material, apparently in violation of its IAEA...
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IAEA Puts off Showdown with Iran
With three key European countries intent on giving Iran a final chance to resolve international concerns about its nuclear program, the International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA) Board of Governors has again refused to meet U.S. demands that the matter...
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Iran: Getting Back on Track
Since the world's nuclear watchdog agency confirmed reports of Iran's extensive and secret nuclear activities more than two years ago, international concerns that Tehran might soon acquire bomb-making capabilities have grown.The crisis will surely worsen...
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LOOKING BACK: The U.S. Senate Vote on the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty
This month marks the fifth anniversary of one of the most self-defeating moments in the U.S. Senate's history of involvement in international arms control. On Oct. 13, 1999, that body voted 51-48 against ratifying the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT),...
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More U.S. Claims on Iraq WMD Rebutted
A recent report from the United Nations Monitoring, Verification and Inspection Commission (UNMOVIC) further undermines pre-war U.S. claims that Iraq was developing unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) capable of delivering chemical and biological weapons....
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New Delays in U.S. Missile Defense
Amid a final push to deploy several long-range, ground-based ballistic missile interceptors this fall, the Missile Defense Agency (MDA) again postponed a much-delayed inaugural test of two crucial components comprising the interceptor. Pentagon officials...
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North Korea Skips Six-Party Talks
Despite a June agreement, North Korea refused to take part in another round of six-party talks before the end of September, blaming both U.S. policy and South Korea's recently revealed nuclear experiments. Still, all parties continue to express interest...
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Pakistan Advances Export Controls
Pakistan's Senate Sept. 18 approved export control legislation intended to strengthen current measures to prevent proliferation of weapons of mass destruction. The bill is expected to be signed into law by Pakistani President Gen. Pervez Musharraf shortly.Movement...
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Report Backs Access to Pathogen Codes
Restricting access to information on the DNA of deadly pathogens will not prevent bioterrorism and will actually hinder efforts to combat infectious diseases, a National Research Council (NRC) report said Sept. 9. Instead, it recommended an international...
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Russia, U.S. Bolster Regional Nuclear Security Following Terrorist Attacks
A series of recent terrorist attacks in Beslan and Moscow attributed to Chechen rebels have spurred the United States and the Kremlin to step up activities to guard Russia's high-risk nuclear materials.The Russian Atomic Energy Agency announced Sept....
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Test Ban Infrastructure: A Concrete Reality
VIENNA-Five years ago, the U.S. Senate rejected the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) by a vote of 51-48, dashing hopes that a permanent ban on nuclear tests would soon be a global reality. The Bush administration has said that it does not plan to...
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Treaty Update
The Australia GroupEstonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, and Slovenia became members of the Australia Group in June. Members of the now 38-country regime agree to coordinate their domestic export controls to limit the supply of chemicals and biological...
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U.S. Fissile Material Ban Plan Fizzles
A U.S. government effort to begin negotiations this summer on a treaty banning production of two key ingredients for nuclear weapons fizzled when Washington failed to fully explain its new position toward the agreement.After a prolonged review, the United...
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U.S. Lifts Remaining Economic Sanctions against Libya
President George W. Bush lifted most remaining U.S. sanctions on Libya Sept. 20, two days before Assistant Secretary of State for Verification and Compliance Paula DeSutter told Congress that verification of Libya's disarmament tasks is "essentially...
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U.S. Pushes IAEA to Probe Suspected Iranian Nuclear Site
The United States wants the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to investigate a site where Iran may be conducting tests for a nuclear weapons program, a Department of State official told Arms Control Today Sept. 21.The official said the site,...
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What's Behind: Bush's Nuclear Cuts?
It is not every day that the U.S. government decides to cut its nuclear-weapons stockpile in half. Yet, the mainstream media paid little attention on June 1 when Linton F. Brooks, head of the National Nuclear Security Administration, announced that by...
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