Arms Control Today

Arms Control Today is a magazine published 10 times a year by the Arms Control Association in Washington, DC. Founded in 1972, its subjects are international arms control issues, peace and international affairs. Its audience includes policy makers, educators and the general public.

Articles from Vol. 26, No. 9, November/December

Arms Control and the 105th Congress
The 105th Congress, which begins work in January, will not be radically different from the 104th Congress. For advocates of pending arms control treaties and further reductions in weapons of mass destruction, that similarity is a mixed blessing. Entering...
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Belarus Completes Transfer of Nuclear Warheads to Russia
IN LATE November, Belarus transferred the last 16 former Soviet SS-25 ICBMs and the associated nuclear warheads to Russia, completing the withdrawal of all nuclear weapons from the non-Russian former Soviet republics. On November 27, a ceremony was held...
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BWC Review Conference Ends without Compliance Protocol
AN INTERNATIONAL agreement to strengthen the 1972 Biological Weapons Convention (BWC) will not be completed by 1998, the date favored by the United States and the European Union (EU), according to the results of the fourth review conference of the BWC...
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DOE Proposes Downsized Weapons Complex
The Department of Energy (DOE) recommended the maintenance of eight nuclear weapons facilities and the construction of three new hydrodynamic test facilities in its Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for Stockpile Stewardship and...
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Excess Weapons Plutonium: How to Reduce a Clear and Present Danger
The ongoing dismantlement of tens of thousands of U.S. and Russian nuclear weapons offers immeasurable benefits for the security of the United States and the world. But it is also creating a daunting new security challenge: controlling the risks of theft,...
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OSCE Summit Stresses Cooperation; CFE States Set out Adaptation Plan
AGAINST THE backdrop of continuing U.S.-Russian tensions over NATO expansion, the 52 participating states of the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE) agreed to a "Lisbon Declaration on a Common and Comprehensive Security Model for...
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Retired Generals Re-Ignite Debate over Abolition of Nuclear Weapons
IN A HIGHLY publicized address to the National Press Club on December 4, retired General Lee Butler, former commander-in-chief of the U.S. Strategic Air Command, and retired General Andrew Goodpaster, former supreme allied commander in Europe, released...
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'Scope and Parameters' of CFE Adaptation
On December 1, the 30 states-parties to the Conventional Armed Forces in Europe (CFE) Treaty met in Lisbon and approved a document outlining the "scope and parameters" for the negotiations on the "modernization" of the treaty. (See p. 21.) Talks are...
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Statement on Nuclear Weapons by International Generals and Admirals
We, military professionals, who have devoted our lives to the national security of our countries and our peoples, are convinced that the continuing existence of nuclear powers, and the ever present threat of acquisition of these weapons by others, constitutes...
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Statement on the Reduction of Nuclear Arsenals by Gens. Butler and Goodpaster
As senior military officers, we have given close attention over many years to the role of nuclear weapons as well as the risks they involve. With the end of the Cold War, these weapons are of sharply reduced utility, and there is much now to be gained...
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UN Approves Resolution Calling for Mine Ban 'As Soon as Possible'
IN THE closing days of its 51 st session, the UN General Assembly approved a U.S.sponsored resolution calling on states to complete negotiations "as soon as possible" on a legally binding international agreement banning the production, stockpiling, use...
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U.S. Moving toward Implementation of 1985 Sino-U.S. Nuclear Accord
THE CLINTON administration seems poised to implement a 1985 Sino-U.S. agreement that would allow U.S. companies to participate in nuclear energy projects in China, despite continuing reports of Chinese nuclear- and weapons-related assistance to Iran...
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U.S., Russia Amend HEU Deal, Accelerating Implementation Pace
IN MID-NOVEMBER, the United States and Russia reached an agreement that will substantially accelerate implementation of the 1993 accord covering the U.S. purchase of Russian low enriched uranium (LEU) blended down from 500 metric tons of highly enriched...
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U.S. Withholds Approval for Computer Exports to Russia
IN LATE OCTOBER, the Department of Commerce "returned without action" export license applications for three high-speed computers destined for Russian nuclear weapons laboratories, a move strongly criticized by the Russian Ministry of Atomic Energy (MINATOM)....
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"Your Move, Mr. President"
President Clinton must move expeditiously to establish and act upon the arms control agenda for his second term. The most urgent items on the agenda are actions to promote Russian ratification of START II, which would reduce strategic nuclear warheads...
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