Arms Control Today

Arms Control Today is a magazine published 10 times a year by the Arms Control Association in Washington, DC. Founded in 1972, its subjects are international arms control issues, peace and international affairs. Its audience includes policy makers, educators and the general public.

Articles from Vol. 32, No. 8, October

A Breakdown of Breakout: U.S. and Russian Warhead Production Capabilities
Pentagon concerns about Russia's warhead production capacity are unwarranted. The U.S. could facilitate further arms reductions while still hedging against a Russian breakout. The Strategic Offensive Reductions Treaty signed in May cuts the U.S. and...
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Baltics Deny Plans to Deploy NATO Nuclear Weapons
LATVIA, LITHUANIA, AND Estonia denied Russian allegations in September that they would station tactical nuclear weapons on their territories if they joined NATO. An unnamed Russian defense ministry official told Interfax news agency September 16, "We...
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CD Ends Year without Negotiations
THE UN CONFERENCE on Disarmament (CD) extended its record of futility for a fourth consecutive year September 12 when the conference closed the final round of its annual three-part session without having held any negotiations. Signaling its displeasure...
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Counterproliferation at Core of New Security Strategy
NEWS AND NEGOTIATIONS A NEW BUSH administration report released September 20 placed counterproliferation and pre-emptive action at the heart of U.S. foreign policy, drawing criticism from some members of Congress and allies. Reflecting the strong influence...
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Explaining Mr. Putin: Russia's New Nuclear Diplomacy
Vladimir Putin warned against U.S. withdrawal from the ABM Treaty, but it is clear that, at least in the short term, Russia's reaction has been much more positive than expected. Since at least 1999, much of the arms control and Russia-watching communities...
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GAO Reports on U.S. Arms Exports Discrepancies
U.S. PROCESSES FOR controlling arms exports have failed to properly review and account for weapons and technology transfers, according to two reports the General Accounting Office (GAO) released September 20. One report by the GAO, a nonpartisan government...
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Iraq: A Chronology of UN Inspections and an Assessment of Their Accomplishments
In April 1991, as part of the permanent cease-fire agreement ending the Persian Gulf War, the UN Security Council ordered Iraq to eliminate under international supervision its biological, chemical, and nuclear weapons programs, as well as its ballistic...
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Iraq to Accept UN Inspections; U.S. Officials Skeptical
-NEWS AND NEGOTIATIONS UN WEAPONS INSPECTORS can return to Iraq "without conditions," Baghdad said September 16, reversing a stance that has barred inspectors from the country for almost four years. The announcement followed a September 12 speech by...
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Landmine Treaty Members Meet
Representatives of more than 100 countries that have ratified or signed the Ottawa Convention banning the use, stockpiling, production, and transfer of anti-personnel landmines (APLs) met September 16-20 in Geneva. The United States, which has not signed...
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North Korea Extends Missile-Test Moratorium; U.S. to Send Kelly
NEWS AND NEGOTIATIONS NORTH KOREA ANNOUNCED September 17 that it would indefinitely extend its moratorium on testing long-range missiles. Subsequently, the United States said September 26 that it would send an interagency delegation led by James Kelly,...
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Nuclear Test Readiness at Risk, DOE Reports
THE ENERGY DEPARTMENT'S ability to resume full-scale nuclear testing within 36 months is at risk due to the loss of experienced employees, dismantled facilities, and unusable equipment, according to a report by the department's Office of Inspector General...
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OPCW Fails to Agree on Budget, Russian Request for Extension
MEETING SEPTEMBER 10-13, the executive council of the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW), the international body responsible for overseeing the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC), was unable to agree on a budget for 2003 or on...
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Prevention, Not Pre-Emption
FOCUS Yielding to pressure from members of Congress and major U.S. allies, President George W. Bush made the common sense decision to appeal to the United Nations to address the chronic problem of Iraq's weapons of mass destruction programs. As a result...
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U.S. Attempts to Sink BWC Review Conference
THE UNITED STATES is demanding that the upcoming Biological Weapons Convention (BWC) review conference make no decisions beyond agreeing to hold another conference in 2006, generating anger among many BWC states-parties. In talking points distributed...
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U.S. Sanctions Three Russian Companies
On September 12, the United States made public an August decision to sanction three Russian companies for shipping arms to Libya, Sudan, and Syria. At the same time, Washington decided that it would not be in the U.S. national interest to impose sanctions...
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U.S. Says Ukrainian President Approved Arms Sale to Iraq
NEWS AND NEGOTIATIONS THE UNITED STATES has concluded that Ukrainian President Leonid Kuchma authorized an illegal arms sale to Iraq two years ago, the State Department announced September 24. In response, Washington is putting a hold on a portion of...
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