Arms Control Today

Arms Control Today is a magazine published 10 times a year by the Arms Control Association in Washington, DC. Founded in 1972, its subjects are international arms control issues, peace and international affairs. Its audience includes policy makers, educators and the general public.

Articles from Vol. 35, No. 4, May

Bolton Hearings Highlight Internal Differences on Cuba's Biological Weapons
During April 11-12 Senate Foreign Relations Committee hearings on the confirmation of John R. Bolton to be U.S. permanent representative to the United Nations, a major controversy involved the use of intelligence on alleged Cuban efforts that might lead...
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BOOK REVIEW: Biological Weapons Breakdown
BOOK REVIEW: Biological Weapons BreakdownThe Biological Weapons Convention: A Failed RevolutionBy Jez LittlewoodAshgate Publishing Ltd., 2005, 250 pp.Nearly four years have passed since the Bush administration's dramatic rejection of a draft protocol...
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Commission Slams WMD Intelligence
A White House-appointed commission March 31 offered a scathing A. A-account of U.S. intelligence failures prior to the U.S.-led invasion of Iraq in March 2003. Additionally, it acknowledged that U.S. intelligence is not much better on other weapons of...
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Editor's NOTE
This month, delegations from nearly 190 countries will meet in New York to discuss the status of the nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty (NPT). They will certainly have plenty to debate.In the five years since the last such NPT review conference, North Korea...
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EU Plays New Role in Iran Talks
Although three European states have taken the lead in negotiating with Iran, the talks have also provided an unprecedented opportunity for the European Union and its various organs to engage in high-level strategic diplomacy.The leading role has been...
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Iranian Negotiators' Veiled Flexibility
News ANALYSISIn seeking to persuade Iran to cease completely its gas centrifuge-based uranium-enrichment program, France, Germany, and the United Kingdom have offered a combination of incentives and disincentives. So far, Iran has proven to be a tough...
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Letters TO THE EDITOR
The Future of Arms ControlIt was an honor to have our book, The Future of Arms Control, reviewed in the March issue of Arms Control Today by such a distinguished scholar as John Steinbruner. We are grateful that he concludes that the book is worth reading....
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Missile Defense Performance Top Concern
A congressional investigative body recently concluded that operation of the Pentagon's fledgling missile defense system "remains uncertain and unverified."Last fall, the Pentagon's Missile Defense Agency (MDA) installed six long-range, ground-based ballistic...
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New Details Emerge on Pakistani Networks
New details are emerging about Pakistan's role as both a customer and supplier of materials and equipment with potential nuclear weapons applications as international investigations pry deeper into the country's clandestine procurement networks.Islamabad...
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NPT Withdrawal: Time for the Security Council to Step In
The nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty (NPT) provides that a state-party intending to withdraw from the treaty must give the UN Security Council three months' notice of its intention and provide the Security Council with its reasons for withdrawal. This...
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Pakistan, India Get Green Light to Buy U.S. Fighter Jets
The Bush administration March 25 announced its willingness to sell advanced fighter aircraft to India and Pakistan, reversing 15 years of U.S. policy to deny Islamabad such arms because of its nuclear weapons ambitions. The decision came shortly after...
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Panel Delays Vote on Bolton Nomination
The Senate Foreign Relations Committee April 19 delayed a vote on John R. Bolton's nomination as U.S. permanent representative to the United Nations. The holdup came after a series of hearings, press reports, and interviews by committee aides raised...
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Replacement Nuclear Warheads? Buyer Beware
Soon after President George W. Bush took office, the Pentagon proposed a controversial new plan for U.S. nuclear forces that calls for new low-yield warheads and enhancements of existing high-yield earth-penetrating weapons to expand U.S. nuclear attack...
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Testing Time: For Europe's Nonproliferation Strategy
Members of the European Union, shaken by their failure to unite on a pre-war strategy toward Iraq, decided in late 2003 that they needed a new approach for dealing with future challenges from countries with nuclear, chemical, or biological weapons. In...
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Ukraine Admits Missile Transfers
Ukrainian officials have acknowledged that a total of 12 Kh-55 medium-range, air-launched cruise missiles capable of carrying nuclear warheads were transferred from Ukraine to Iran and China in the last five years. U.S. officials expressed particular...
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UN Adopts Nuclear Terrorism Convention; Treaty Seven Years in the Making
The UN General Assembly April 13 adopted an international convention addressing the threat of nuclear terrorism, bringing an end to more than seven years of negotiations on the document. The treaty criminalizes the possession, use, or threat of use of...
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U.S. Pushes to Restart North Korea Talks
After a fresh series of provocative North Korean actions, Assistant Secretary of State for East Asian and Pacific Affairs Christopher Hill traveled to China, Japan, and South Korea late last month in another effort to restart six-party talks designed...
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U.S. Sets Missile Defense for Europe, Space
The Pentagon has plans to deploy missile interceptors in space and Europe over the next several years, even though it requested little or no funding for these activities in its latest budget proposal in February.Speaking April 11 to a Washington audience,...
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U.S. Shifts Fuel Cycle Position?
Energy secretary Samuel Bodman indicated in an April 5 speech that the United States may be adjusting its position on measures intended to limit the spread of materials and technologies that could be used to make nuclear weapons.Bodman's remarks were...
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U.S. Weighing Nuclear Stockpile Changes
Existing nuclear weapons and infrastructure need a makeover if the United States wants to continue reducing its arsenal, a top Department of Energy official told Senate panels in April. But some lawmakers are leery that the initiative might open the...
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Venezuela Arms Buys Irk U.S. Officials
The United States has criticized Venezuela's recent spate of arms purchases, viewing it as potentially unsettling to Latin America. Venezuela defends the buys as bolstering its national security.In March, Venezuela concluded deals for 10 military helicopters...
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Zeroing in on Noncompliance: An Interview with Assistant Secretary of State Stephen G. Rademaker on the U.S. Approach to the 2005 Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty Review Conference
Stephen G. Rademaker has served as assistant secretary of state for arms control since August 2002. Recently, he was also charged with overseeing the department's nonproliferation bureau. In an April 19 interview with Arms Control Today, Rademaker shared...
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