Arms Control Today

Arms Control Today is a magazine published 10 times a year by the Arms Control Association in Washington, DC. Founded in 1972, its subjects are international arms control issues, peace and international affairs. Its audience includes policy makers, educators and the general public.

Articles from Vol. 37, No. 10, December

BOOK REVIEW: A Somber Trip Down Memory Lane
BOOK REVIEW: A Somber Trip Down Memory Lane Arsenals of Folly: The Making of the Nuclear Arms Race By Richard Rhodes, Alfred A. Knopf, October 2007, 400 pp.Richard Rhodes has written an altogether fitting sequel to his two exceptional books on the early...
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Building Confidence in Pakistan's Nuclear Security
Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf's decision last month to declare a national emergency and suspend the constitution has ratcheted up concerns about the safety and security of that country's nuclear arsenal. Pakistani officials have categorically...
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Bush Nuclear Fuel-Cycle Program Suffers Blows
After a sharply critical report from a high-level independent panel and amid continued criticism from Congress, the Bush administration appears to be scaling back its ambitions for the domestic leg of its controversial Global Nuclear Energy Partnership...
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Cluster Munitions Negotiations Launched
Despite a process already underway to restrict cluster munitions, a group of states recently agreed to another set of negotiations on those weapons systems. The new talks will commence in January and involve countries, such as Russia and the United States,...
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CWC Conference Boosts Treaty, Exposes Rifts
A Nov. 5-9 annual meeting of Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC) states-parties approved a number of decisions to strengthen the treaty but also exposed some differing views among the 116 participating states. Those differences on issues related to the...
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Disablement Begins but Process Unclear
On Nov. 5, a team of U.S. experts led efforts to begin disablement of North Korea's core nuclear facilities at Yongbyon. According to U.S. officials, disabling the facilities is intended to ensure that they cannot be operated for at least a year while...
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Editor's NOTE
It is not always obvious when arms control agreements have been successful. But as Peter Herby and Eve La Haye demonstrate in this month's cover story, a decade-old treaty banning anti-personnel landmines has had an impact in the clearest way possible:...
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Europe Eager to Preserve CFE Treaty
Many European governments are increasingly anxious about the future of a treaty limiting conventional arms in Europe, but officials say there should be no cause for immediate alarm if Russia suspends implementation of the accord. The Kremlin maintains...
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How Does It Stack Up? the Anti-Personnel Mine Ban Convention at 10
The Anti-Personnel Mine Ban Convention, most often referred to as the Ottawa Convention,1 is built on a few simple ideas: civilians should not be killed or maimed by weapons that strike blindly and senselessly, either during or after conflicts; wars...
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IAEA Issues Mixed Findings on Iran
The Nov. 15 release of a key report on Iran's nuclear program and cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) does not appear to have mended a split in the UN security Council. The body's permanent members remain divided on the virtue...
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In Memoriam: Randall Caroline Forsberg
Many of us aspire to develop ideas that make a significant and positive difference to society and politics. Few succeed in the way that Randall Caroline Forsberg did over the course of her long and productive career as a peace and disarmament researcher...
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Is There Any Fizz Left in the Fissban? Prospects for a Fissile Material Cutoff Treaty
The pursuit of a multilateral ban on the production of fissile material, highly enriched uranium (HEU) and plutonium, for nuclear weapons has been one of the longest-running postWorld War II enterprises of the international community and unfortunately...
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Letter TO THE EDITOR
Detecting Clandestine EnrichmentTrevor Findlay ("Looking back: The Additional Protocol," Nov. 2007) focused on the difficulties of verifying large bulk-handling facilities in his survey of future challenges. In reality, however, it is still the detection...
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NK Continues Denial of Enrichment Program
Over the past five years, U.S. officials have alleged that North Korea has pursued a program to produce highly enriched uranium (HEU) for nuclear weapons. In recent discussions with U.S. officials, North Korea has sought to prove that the dual-use materials...
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Nuclear Material Consolidation Schedule Lags
Despite nearly two years of deliberations, the Department of Energy lags in presenting plans for the consolidation and disposal of fissile and other high-risk nuclear material, congressional investigators have concluded.The Energy Department currently...
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Nuclear Weapons Alert Status Debated
At an annual United Nations meeting, a nonbinding resolution calling on nuclear-armed states to lessen the alert level of those weapons recently won the support of 124 countries despite British, French, and U.S. opposition. It also prompted further debate...
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Revived U.S.-Indian Deal Heads to IAEA
After appearing close to expiration, the U.S.-Indian civil nuclear cooperation deal was recently resuscitated when some Indian lawmakers relaxed their opposition to government talks with the world's nuclear monitoring agency. The deal's recovery, however,...
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The 2008 Presidential Primaries and Arms Control
For more than a year, the 2008 presidential candidates have been traveling the country, giving speeches, writing articles, participating in debates, and shaking hands in anticipation of primaries and caucuses that are set to begin in January. Although...
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The CFE Treaty and European Security
A mere 20 years ago, massive numbers of conventional and nuclear forces stood poised for attack on opposite sides of the Iron Curtain. NATO and Soviet bloc countries were finally able to draw down their arsenals, ease tensions, and build trust with verification...
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U.S.-Pakistani Arms Pipeline Stays Open
Deeming Pakistan a vital ally, the Bush administration has ignored U.S. lawmaker calls to halt arms transfers to the Pakistani government following the military regime's November crackdown on political opponents, the court system, and the media.On Nov....
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U.S., Russia Recast Plutonium-Disposition Pact
After struggling for seven years to move forward with an agreement to dispose of 34 metric tons of weapons-grade plutonium each, the United States has agreed to recast the accord to reflect Russian preferences on the method of disposition more closely.Russia...
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