Arms Control Today

Arms Control Today is a magazine published 10 times a year by the Arms Control Association in Washington, DC. Founded in 1972, its subjects are international arms control issues, peace and international affairs. Its audience includes policy makers, educators and the general public.

Articles from Vol. 27, No. 1, March

111 States Consider Draft Treaty Banning Anti-Personnel Landmines
AFTER CONSIDERING an Austrian draft of a treaty to ban anti-personnel landmines, 111 states concluded their February 12-14 closed-door meeting in Vienna by sending Austria back to the drawing board. The draft served as a starting point for the upcoming...
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Administration Releases NATO Expansion Cost Report
On February 24, the Clinton administration released its "Report to the Congress on the Enlargement of NATO: Rationale, Benefits, Costs, and Implications." The study, conducted by the Department of Defense (DOD), estimated the cost of NATO enlargement...
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Arms Control and the Helsinki Summit: Issues and Obstacles in the Second Clinton Term
In conjunction with its March 26 annual luncheon, the Arms Control Association (ACA) held a panel discussion on the arms control issues facing President Bill Clinton following the outcome of the Helsinki summit, including NATO expansion, future strategic...
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CD Ends First Session of 1997 without Mandates for Negotiations
THE 61-NATION UN Conference on Disarmament (CD) in Geneva ended its first 1997 session on March 27 without achieving agreed mandates for negotiations or establishing the necessary bodies in which to conduct them. Beginning its work on January 21, the...
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Gore-Chernomyrdin Commission Expands Cooperative Measures
IN A PRELUDE to the U.S.-Russian summit in Helsinki, Vice President Al Gore and Russian Prime Minister Viktor Chernomyrdin met in Washington on February 6 and 7 for the eighth session of the U.S.Russian Joint Commission on Economic and Technological...
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Helsinki: A Pyrrhic Victory?
At the Helsinki summit, Presidents Clinton and Yeltsin, despite deep differences over NATO expansion, agreed on arms control proposals intended to obtain the Russian Duma's ratification of START II. Despite the appearance of progress, however, it is...
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Joint Statements of the Helsinki Summit
Joint Statement on Parameters On Future Reductions In Nuclear Forces Presidents Clinton and Yeltsin underscore that, with the end of the Cold War, major progress has been achieved with regard to strengthening strategic stability and nuclear security...
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Majority Leader Emerges as Key to Fate of CWC in Senate
WITH THE April 29 deadline for the Chemical Weapons Convention's (CWC's) entry into force approaching, prospects for Senate approval remain uncertain. Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott (R-MS) has emerged as the key to the fate of the CWC. His decisions...
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NATO Presents Initial Proposal for Adaptation of CFE Treaty
REASSURING Moscow that NATO's expansion will not threaten Russian security interests has become one of the main alliance objectives in negotiations to adapt the 1990 Conventional Armed Forces in Europe (CFE) Treaty to post-Cold War Europe. On February...
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The Arms Control Agenda at the Helsinki Summit
After agreeing to disagree on the desirability and acceptability of NATO enlargement, President Bill Clinton and Russian President Boris Yeltsin reached agreement on a number of arms control issues during their March 2021 summit meeting in Helsinki,...
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The Post-Cold War Settlement in Europe: A Triumph of Arms Control
If a cure for cancer were discovered, what would be the response? There would be admiration for the discoverers and celebration of the discovery. It would be a great, triumphal public event. For the political equivalent of cancer, a cure has been discovered....
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U.S. Investigating Computer Exports to Russian Nuclear Weapons Labs
ANXIOUS TO test the safety and reliability of its nuclear arsenal without nuclear testing, Russia has acquired five American-made supercomputers, according to Russia's Ministry of Atomic Energy (MINATOM). The acquisitions of the supercomputers for use...
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